Creationism and Earthquakes

BECAUSE of the recent earthquake in Chile, we bring you a guest column appearing in the Abilene Reporter News, a daily newspaper based in Abilene, Texas. In the pages of that worthy organ we read The anatomy of a earthquake. Yes, dear reader, that’s the exact title — it says “a earthquake.”

The author of today’s column is Earl Harrison, who is described as being a certified professional geologist in Abilene. We Googled around to see who he is, but didn’t find much. We learned, however, that our cyber colleague, John Pieret, has scooped us on this story. To acknowledge his priority we link to his fine blog article on this same topic: Disconnect.

Although we found no indication anywhere of Earl’s educational status, none is needed. Earl must be a respected intellect, because the Abilene Reporter News has published his writing before, for example: U.S. must keep Christian roots. Verily, Earl’s education speaks for itself. Here are some excerpts from today’s column, with bold added by us:

The earthquake that devastated the island of Haiti was the result of natural and explainable earth processes.

Earl starts out okay. But then:

As we take a look at the intelligent design of the creation of our solar system, with this earth being included, we must conclude that the total creation was the handy-work of a “Supreme Intelligence” force, which we credit to God.

Deep thinking, Earl. Way to go! Let’s read on:

For the atheist, agnostics and any other nonbeliever, there is no other possible answer. They cannot prove otherwise.

Aaaargh!! We continue:

In the creation, God instilled all of the principle physical forces in the creation that would preserve the creation and control its continued existence. There cannot be any other logical conclusion for the creation.

The people of Abilene are fortunate to have such a giant living among them. Here’s more from the pen of this great man:

In the study of our earth, science has determined facts about the earth and its functioning. Science has determined that this earth is composed of an outer layer of rigid rocks and designated it as the crust. Below the rigid crust is a layer of molten magnetic earth materials, called the mantle. The innermost portion is a solid body, designated as the core.

Wow! Magnetic mantle, solid core. Who knew?

We’re going to skip most of Earl’s column, because we can’t find anything else worth excerpting — wait, you must see this:

The damage done to the island of Haiti is horrible proof of the earthquake.

Behold, O ye earthquake skeptics — there’s the proof!

And so we leave Earl and the town of Abiline. Bless ‘em all.

Copyright © 2010. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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10 responses to “Creationism and Earthquakes

  1. Where’s the real fun stuff? The 4 questions everyone should ask Harrison are:

    1. How old is the Earth?

    2. How old is life on Earth?

    3. Do humans share common ancestors with other species?

    4. Is Pat Robertson right that these disasters are God’s punishment?

    Given that he is a geologist I would expect him to disagree with the YEC-on-the-street on most or all answers. But I would also expect him to evade most or all questions for the sake of the big tent.

  2. The damage done to the island of Haiti is horrible proof of the earthquake.

    It should have read “is horrible proof of a earthquake,” methinks.

    Anyway, it’s no wonder such an article appeared in whatever-that-paper’s-name-was. Since they obviously don’t do much proofreading, why should anyone think their editors are scientifically literate? The tragedy is, similar articles appear in way better known papers.

    Disclaimer: When I make mistakes on some blog, it’s just some random bloke (not even native English speaker) writing comments without re-reading them before hitting “submit”. I wonder what’s their excuse?

  3. Armand K says:

    Disclaimer: When I make mistakes on some blog, it’s just some random bloke (not even native English speaker) writing comments without re-reading them before hitting “submit”. I wonder what’s their excuse?

    When I make mistakes, it’s because I rely on myself for proof-reading — a dreadfully imperfect system.

  4. Frank J asks: “Is Pat Robertson right that these disasters are God’s punishment?”

    Probably. There’s been a lot of sin in the Pacific rim, and in Haiti too, so it all makes sense.

  5. When I make mistakes, it’s because I rely on myself for proof-reading — a dreadfully imperfect system.

    Yeah, I know what you mean. It’s a major headache for me, as I do translations and typesetting for a living. (However, I don’t think it’s such a disaster if I don’t treat comments on the web with the same attention I reserve for my clients’ materials.)

  6. I wonder if this is the result of a typical Texas style science education. Pitiful.

  7. retiredsciguy

    After reading the entire article at the source, I think the tagline at the end of the article should read “Earl Harrison is a *certifiable* professional geologist here in Abilene”. There are so many factual errors in his column that he can’t possibly be a geologist — professional or otherwise. A seventh-grade student earning a “C” in Earth Science would know better. “Liquid mantle”? “Magnetic mantle”?

    Makes you wonder about the people doing the certifying of “professional geologists” in Texas.

  8. retiredsciguy says: “There are so many factual errors in his column that he can’t possibly be a geologist — professional or otherwise.”

    I suspect he’s a “flood geologist,” and quite likely his science “proves” that the earth is only 6,000 years old.

  9. I think I found his Doctoral dissertation, so he is probably a real geologist.

    http://etd.lib.ttu.edu/theses/available/etd-09152009-31295001870731/unrestricted/31295001870731.pdf

    He seems to be confused on the layers though, so maybe he stopped working on anything real after buying/earning his doctorate.

  10. Tundra Boy says: “I think I found his Doctoral dissertation, so he is probably a real geologist. ”

    Maybe. But the planet he described isn’t the same one I learned about.