Ken Ham’s “Spiritual War” Against Science

Earlier this month we wrote Black Holes from Before the Big Bang, about a paper that described the possibility of detecting black holes that may have persisted from an earlier version of the universe, before the Big Bang.

It didn’t occur to us that such a subject would offend Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo), the creationist Australian entrepreneur who has become the ayatollah of Appalachia. He runs the online creationist ministry, Answers in Genesis (AIG), and he also created the infamous, mind-boggling Creation Museum.

But ol’ Hambo is offended. He’s infuriated! At the AIG website there’s an article by Hambo titled They Call It “Science”. It’s remarkably revealing about how the man thinks. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

It is interesting to note that secularists can speculate with all sorts of (even way out) ideas concerning the origin of the universe, and it is written up as serious scientific research — without receiving ridicule. For instance, read the following: …

Hambo quotes from Out with a bang — new theory threatens to rewrite origins of universe. That’s an article at Canada.com, a website that serves several Canadian newspapers, including the Vancouver Sun, the Calgary Herald, and many others. If you read our earlier post you already know the theory that got the ol’ creationist all worked up. Let’s read on from Hambo’s rant:

Although other scientists disagree with them, nonetheless, they are not mocked. However, as soon as a Christian mentions “In the beginning God created the Heavens and the earth,” they are usually greatly ridiculed by such writers and these researchers.

If Genesis is proffered as a cosmological theory, yes, ridicule would be in order. But in church, no, because that’s the proper place for Genesis. Hambo seems unaware of this. To him, it’s gotta be all Genesis, all the time. We continue:

Even in this article about the universes existing through infinite time, there is a slam at the Bible’s account of origins. The article goes on to state the following: …

A slam at the bible? Hambo selectively picks a part of what the Canadian newspaper was told by Alan Coley, one of the authors of the paper we wrote about. Coley says that his theory awaits experimental confirmation, much as early geology, describing an old earth (contrary to the bible) awaited confirmation. That’s the “slam” at the bible. About that bit of blasphemy, Hambo says:

To me, such an attack on the Bible is a reminder that we are in a spiritual battle. Why is it that secular scientists can suggest all sorts of way out ideas and be taken seriously, but as soon as Christians talk about the Bible’s account of history, they are ridiculed?

Why — oh why! — don’t scientists take Hambo’s creation science seriously? Here’s more:

As the Bible teaches us, if one is not for Christ, then that one is against! There is no neutrality in this spiritual battle.

Yowee! No fanaticism there. But Hambo can’t understand the ridicule. One last excerpt:

People would not react the way they do about what the Bible teaches if it was not a spiritual battle. For me, this is a confirmation that what the Bible teaches about the state of man is true.

So there you are, dear reader. Hambo has declared spiritual war! Jeepers, this is serious.

Copyright © 2011. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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11 responses to “Ken Ham’s “Spiritual War” Against Science

  1. The irate Australian says, “People would not react the way they do about what the Bible teaches if it was not a spiritual battle.”

    I certainly would not react the way I do, if the zealots would keep it out of my face, out of my school, and out of my government, and in their homes and churches where it belongs!

    The bible doesn’t teach me diddly, and that doesn’t make me part of your imaginary battle.

  2. As the Bible teaches us, if one is not for Christ, then that one is against! There is no neutrality in this spiritual battle…

    Tsk, tsk; poor Ken. Those meddling secularists will insist on trying his patience. What a pity the church can’t just burn ‘em all for heresy, like in the good ol’ days.

  3. The main thing that distinguishes scientific hypotheses from ideas in religion is that hypotheses can be refuted by observation – Lee Smolin

  4. waldteufel

    Is the Hamster a very skilled and cunning con man, or just clinically insane?
    Or both?

    I dunno.

    *Shrugs*

  5. I think Ham is getting more and more sensitive to the continuing ridicule he receives. It seems like several of his posts, from the time he was expelled from the homeschool convention, have been very defensive.

  6. Ed says: “I think Ham is getting more and more sensitive to the continuing ridicule he receives.”

    Sensitive? He’s certainly not introspective. “Self-righteous anger” is how I’d describe it.

  7. Crudely Wrott

    Why is it that secular scientists can suggest all sorts of way out ideas and be taken seriously, but as soon as Christians talk about the Bible’s account of history, they are ridiculed?

    Because, Ken, scientific ideas can be tested and quickly categorized as probable or not. Then there is that troubling historical record. You’re riding a colt, son.

  8. It’d be funny except I know lots of people who think exactly like that and vote other people who think exactly like that into office. These folks are using government as a weapon in their “spiritual battle”…. as if putting all sorts of oppressive laws on the books isn’t going to make me resent them and fight back all the harder, not to mention consider engaging in civil disobedience for the sake of my own right to live by the dictates of my conscience.

    Of course, there’s always the option to immigrate to countries where religion is no big deal….

  9. Of course, there’s always the option to immigrate to countries where religion is no big deal….

    No big deal, ironically, because everyone got a taste of what Ken is selling.

    In the U.S., there have been numerous sects that have set up their own communities and lived by their own rules. They typically fail because no future generation wants to live like that. But they are fewer and smaller now than they have been in the past, so the example of their failure(s) is not as obvious. One side-consequence of 21st century information sharing and law enforcement is that fewer nut jobs get to realize their dreams, leaving fewer object lessons for the rest of us. Instead, they get the luxury of talking their nuttiness without having to follow through, and that (again, somewhat ironically) tends to pull in a lot more people.

  10. @LRA: Of course, there’s always the option to immigrate to countries where religion is no big deal….

    Sometimes I would like to. Especially when politicians can’t even prounounce the name of my state correctly (Mizzurah, shudder). However, If we all did that eventually the bad guys would win here and then they’d be in control of one of the world’s biggest arsenals (military, industrial, economic, and broadcast). Then it would only be a matter of time before they started exporting their insanity to the more sane nations of the world.

    I realize I probably sound overly alarmist, but I’d rather fight or treat them with disdain here than be chased out of my home.

  11. techreseller

    I can just imagine those physicists sitting there, and someone comes and tells them that some nutcase preacher has declared spiritual war against them. I can see the quizzical WTF looks on their face as they ask “who?”. He declared spiritual war against us. Ummm, OK.