Ken Ham: The Trouble With Scotland

You may recall our recent post, Answers in Genesis Gives Scotland a Chance, in which we described an upcoming visit to Lanarkshire by AIG staffer, Dr. Terry Mortenson, which would provide the Scots “the chance” to learn about the debate that creationists are waging against the theory of evolution.

Participating in that event would be “youth leader” Doctor Nagy Iskander, a friend of AIG. We also told you about an effort led by Professor Paul Braterman to have creationism banned from science classes in Scotland. Because of Braterman’s efforts, Mortenson was going into a bit of a battleground.

We know you’ve been wondering how Scotland reacted to the chance they were given by AIG, and how Mortenson’s performance was received. Today we have a report from Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo to us), co-founder of the online creationist ministry, Answers in Genesis (AIG). In his personal blog at the AIG website we find this: Biblical Creationists Facing Opposition in Scotland.

Hambo’s report reminds us of the scene in Braveheart, shown in the ten-second video above, in which Longshanks (Edward I) says:

The trouble with Scotland is that it’s full of Scots!

Indeed it is. Here are some excerpts from Hambo’s report, with bold font added by us:

Dr. Terry Mortenson (AiG–U.S.) recently returned from the UK, where he spoke in a number of churches and was able to share the truth of God’s Word with the extremely secular British culture. Dr. Mortenson shared with me some of the encounters he was able to have with people in the UK.

Then Hambo summarizes the situation in Scotland:

Sadly, we’re seeing increased opposition in the UK to biblical creation. A recent article in the Scottish Herald titled “Call to Ban Creationism” explains, “Campaigners are also pushing for stricter rules to keep the teaching of creationism out of schools.”

Professor Paul Braterman founded the British Centre for Science Education, which is, according to the article, “a campaign to keep religion out of science classes.” Braterman doesn’t want biblical creation presented as a viable scientific idea.

We told you about all that in our earlier post, so we’ll skip a few paragraphs of old news. If you didn’t see it, here’s another link to that newspaper story: CALL TO BAN CREATIONISM. After that, Hambo says:

Of course, we at Answers in Genesis don’t advocate for government-mandated teaching of biblical creation. But we do support critical thinking — the type of thinking that requires students to look at all the facts and to be able to criticize the assumptions underlying evolutionary (or any other) ideas.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! Hambo doesn’t want creationism taught — no, of course not — but he does want it presented in science classes so the kiddies can look at “all the facts” and then decided everything for themselves. He continues:

Often, after an article like this [the one in the Herald], I’ll read the comments section, to see particularly how secularists react. And as I expected, their comments weren’t civil at all.

Hambo actually quotes some of the comments. They weren’t vicious, but none of them were favorable to AIG. Although you’ve seen that sort of thing before, you may want to click over to the newspaper to see them for yourself. Here’s Hambo’s reaction to those comments:

This is the kind of “civil” conversations that secularists engage in with biblical creationists. This kind of character assassination, intolerance, close-mindedness, misrepresentation, and ignorance of the views of biblical creationists show us that these people don’t know how to defend their views civilly in the free marketplace of ideas. And one of the reasons is that there is no evidence they can point to that confirms their evolutionary ideas.

No evidence — BWAHAHAHAHAHA! Here’s how Hambo ends his depressing report:

I urge you to pray for Dr. Iskander, his wife, and their ministry in Scotland, that God would use them to reach many people with the truth of the gospel. And I urge you to pray for the UK in general, that this proposed ban on creation wouldn’t be successful and that the people there would receive the gospel of Jesus Christ and repent of their rebellion against God.

Longshanks would know what to do about those rebellious Scots. Hambo knows too, but here in the West we don’t settle our religious disputes like that any more. It must be frustrating.

Copyright © 2013. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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11 responses to “Ken Ham: The Trouble With Scotland

  1. Ceteris Paribus

    Ham says:

    “Of course, we at Answers in Genesis don’t advocate for government-mandated teaching of biblical creation. But we do support critical thinking — the type of thinking that requires students to look at all the facts and to be able to criticize the assumptions underlying evolutionary (or any other) ideas.”

    If Ham’s creationism venture follows the model set by alternative medicine proponents, he has good reason to persist with his marketing venture in Scotland. The NHS system finds itself politically unable to cut off funding for homeopathy, acupuncture, and herbal supplements, years after their own studies have repeatedly shown these scams to be no more valid than Ham’s creationism.

  2. Charles Deetz ;)

    there is no evidence they can point to that confirms their evolutionary ideas.

    Makes me think of when Scooby and Shaggy are being harangued by Fred to be on the lookout for ghosts while standing right behind Fred is a ghost. And Scoob and Shag are pointing and gesticulating and bug-eyed, and Fred has no idea what they are doing.

  3. Old Hambo said:

    the extremely secular British culture.

    Secular? As opposed to what? Of the three different countries that form Great Britain (England, Wales, Scotland), two have their own state-sponsored churches. There’s a Church of England and a Church of Scotland. Wales disestablished it’s church in 1920 (according to Wikipedia). And the one country that you speak of (Scotland) has it’s own church whose stated purpose is (my emphasis added):

    is to be a church which seeks to inspire the people of Scotland and beyond with the Good News of Jesus Christ

    Is that not your stated purpose? Well, isnt’ it? Tell you what. Why don’t you meet with the Church of Scotland and get things straight. Then come back to us. Go ahead. We’ll wait.

  4. retiredsciguy

    Gary tells Ol’ Hambo: “Why don’t you meet with the Church of Scotland and get things straight. Then come back to us. Go ahead. We’ll wait.”

    On second thought, Hambo, just stay there in Scotland. Don’t come back to us. That, or return to Australia. If you do that, you could open a new branch of the Creation Museum in the middle of the Nullarbor Plain. Although there is a railroad there, you wouldn’t have to worry about being railroaded out of town… there is no town. Watch out for the wallabies, Kenny Boy. Speaking of wallabies, have you ever figured out how they got to Australia from Mt. Ararat?

  5. Ham thinks the comments are “..character assassination, intolerance, close-mindedness, misrepresentation, and ignorance…”

    The only thing in the comments that comes close to character assassination is “You have to be a very special kind of moron to be a creationist.”

    I’m sure that hurt. But it reminded me of something else A favourite Christian quote:

    “The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. They are corrupt, they have done abominable works, there is none that doeth good.” (Psalm 14)

    Now that‘s character assassination.

  6. I’m discussing creationist infiltration in Scottish education at the Edinburgh Secular Society conference on religion in education on Saturday, http://www.scribd.com/doc/142193967/ESS-Event-Scottish-Campaign-Meeting-2013-06-22

  7. Our retiredsciguy asks:

    Speaking of wallabies, have you ever figured out how they got to Australia from Mt. Ararat?

    Well, d’uh! You told us yourself there’s a railway running through Nullarbor Plain….

  8. retiredsciguy

    @Megalonyx — Well, d’uh yourself! The Ararat Express doesn’t connect with the Nullarbor Line! And a line it is… I recall reading that it has the longest perfectly straight stretch of rail line in the world. (Allowing for the curvature of the earth, of course. Aussies are not Flat-Earthers — they realize they would fall into oblivion if the earth were flat.)

  9. retiredsciguy asks: “Speaking of wallabies, have you ever figured out how they got to Australia from Mt. Ararat?”

    Things were crowded and nasty aboard the Ark. I think all those critters were living in Mrs. Noah’s hair during the voyage — or maybe it was in Noah’s beard — and they must have dropped out when the blessed Ark was cruising around Australia.

  10. retiredsciguy

    @SC — Sounds plausible…

  11. And Noah would have to have travelled a long way to grab the kangaroo, platypus and wombat too. Oh, and the spiny ant-eater as well.