George Bush and Evolution: The Creationist Reaction

EVERYONE has been writing about Cynthia McFadden’s interview of George W. Bush a few days ago. The news appeared at the website of ABC News: Cynthia McFadden Interviews President George W. Bush.

The President’s statements which are relevant to us here are as follows:

MCFADDEN: Is it literally true, the Bible?

BUSH: You know. Probably not … No, I’m not a literalist, but I think you can learn a lot from it, but I do think that the New Testament, for example is … has got … You know, the important lesson is “God sent a son.”

Okay, he’s not a literalist. What else did he say?

MCFADDEN: So, you can read the Bible and not take it literally. I mean you can — it’s not inconsistent to love the Bible and believe in evolution, say.

BUSH: Yeah, I mean, I do. I mean, evolution is an interesting subject. I happen to believe that evolution doesn’t fully explain the mystery of life and …

Then it gets more specific. The bold is added by us:

MCFADDEN: But do you believe in it?

BUSH: That God created the world, I do, yeah.

MCFADDEN: But what about …

BUSH: Well, I think you can have both. I think evolution can — you’re getting me way out of my lane here. I’m just a simple president. But it’s, I think that God created the Earth, created the world; I think the creation of the world is so mysterious it requires something as large as an almighty, and I don’t think it’s incompatible with the scientific proof that there is evolution.

Okay, fine. But what can your Curmudgeon add, now that it’s been all over the internet? We’re going to give you the creationist reaction from the Institute for Creation Research (ICR). They just posted this article: Bush Believes that Creation and Evolution Are Compatible.

ICR’s article reviews the shocking (to them) things Bush said, and then they “refute” them with creationist authorities. After that they make a few general comments. Again, the bold is added by us:

Bush called himself a “simple president,” implying that he does not feel qualified to speak authoritatively on scientific matters. Few people do, since American science education, under the guise of “separation of church and state,” has for decades hindered students from understanding even basic science by limiting their studies to the evolutionary worldview and forbidding an open exploration of the evidence. This effort to suppress sound science continues as special interest groups pressure the Texas State Board of Education to drop the teaching of evolution’s “strengths and weaknesses” from the state science curriculum requirements, which the Board will review in early 2009.

ICR is deeply saddened that the evolutionist conspiracy has infected even President Bush, just as the “effort to suppress sound science” — meaning creation science — is trying to have its way in Texas. Then they say:

Before the evolutionists turned to courts and political policy to dictate evolutionary science education in the public classrooms, scientific origins issues involving creation and evolution were explored and discussed in the places where they should be: in the lab, in the field, and in the proceedings of scientific societies.

Yes, Noah’s Ark was a hot topic in science labs before “the evolutionists turned to courts” and all that horrible stuff. Surely you remember that?

One final excerpt, ICR’s last paragraph:

During his presidency, Bush has affirmed his faith in the Christian God a number of times. And like many professing Christians, he errs in placing human wisdom and what some call science over the authority of the living Word of God. He has believed the pervasive, yet fraudulent, claim that evolution is a fact and that the biblical account cannot be literally true. If Christians even in the highest places of governmental authority cannot trust in the accuracy and authority of God’s Word, then how can we hope that they will lead our nation in “a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty”

It’s a tragedy, according to the creationists at ICR. President Bush “errs in placing human wisdom and what some call science over the authority of the living Word of God.”

Copyright © 2008. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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10 responses to “George Bush and Evolution: The Creationist Reaction

  1. for once in his tenure , GW HINTS at a simple truth, that is progress.

  2. mightyfrijoles

    Now that Doofus Bush has gone and done it. He has alienated the only microscopic piece of the Right that still supported him.

    I am laughing hard. He’s only got a month left, but I think I actually might start liking him. You won’t have to worry about Obama and evolution, but you will have to worry about everything else, especially your wallet.

  3. If only Sarah Palin had said something similar. Well, it wouldn’t have turned things around, but it would’ve been good anyway.

  4. Georgie, Georgie, Georgie, why didn’t you make this much sense years ago?

  5. OHHHH. soo all of a sudden W is a regular MENSA candidate ?

  6. mightyfrijoles // 12-December-2008 at 7:15 pm

    . You won’t have to worry about Obama and evolution,

    Really, i find that hard to believe considering the man thinks he is Jesus

  7. mightyfrijoles

    . You won’t have to worry about Obama and evolution,

    Really, i find that hard to believe considering the man thinks he is Jesus

  8. How can this not backfire against them in their efforts to get accreditation for a distance education graduate degree program that would (in effect) be used for licensing its graduates as high-school “science teachers”?

    Those who follow TX antics more casually might think this issue is closed. Actually, the ICR petition was turned down under the now-FORMER chair of the TX Higher Ed Coordinating Bd. ICR is appealed, so the current situation is one in which ICR can attempt to negotiate an agreement with THECB to avoid litigation. At this juncture, Gov Perry has appointed a Biblical literalist as the new THECB chair. See
    http://curricublog.wordpress.com/2008/11/16/whit-riter/

    BTW, although my curricublog.org domain name has been pirated (which may be part of a good news story re: global warming, according to the Church of the FSM), my blog is still alive and well at its permanent wordpress.com address (see URL above).

  9. Really, i find that hard to believe considering the man thinks he is Jesus

    Satch, where did that come from?

  10. Tony says: “How can this not backfire against them in their efforts to get accreditation for a distance education graduate degree program …”

    Excellent point. I hadn’t thought of that, even though we’ve covered ICR’s efforts for accreditation. But yes, Dubya has given them a poke in the eye.