Texas Creationism: ACLU Is Getting Involved

YOU know how bizarre the educational scene in Texas has been. See, for example: Texas Education War: Phase Two. Well, we may be getting some additional fireworks.

In the Daily Texan, aimed at the students at the University of Texas at Austin, we read: ACLU seeks to separate religion from education. Here are some excerpts, with bold added by us:

At the upcoming American Civil Liberties Union of Texas’ annual meeting, the organization’s leaders say they will search for ways to keep creationism and intelligent design out of the classroom and to promote religious freedom in South Texas.

We know how popular the ACLU must be in Texas. Let’s read on:

Herman [that’s Susan Herman, national ACLU president.] said the organization was founded in 1920 in a response to multiple attempts to repress speech about the war or government. The primary mission of the ACLU is to defend the rights and liberties in the U.S. Constitution and to make sure all people are treated fairly and equally, she said.

It’s mostly a subject for fringe groups these days, so we can’t give you any respectable links, but the ACLU allegedly had a dubious origin with some dubious directors initially. We could be wrong, but we suspect they’ve never taken a case in defense of the 2nd Amendment or the 10th. Anyway, they sometimes take positions we approve of (e.g., the Dover case), so we’ll continue:

Terri Burke, executive director of the ACLU of Texas, said the meeting’s theme of religious tolerance was chosen to bring awareness to the infringement of people’s religious expression.

“Right now, we’re really focused on three things,” Burke said. “The first is to get religion back to our dinner table and houses of worship and out of our schools and town squares; the second is to put learning back in our education system into what has become a police state of our schools; and our third goal is safeguarding our borders.”

The ACLU is for “safeguarding our borders”? Anything’s possible. Here’s more:

While the ACLU will advocate toward separating religion from the classroom, some members of the UT community feel that a holistic approach should be taken when addressing religion and public education.

Ah yes, “separate but holistic.” What’s that all about? Moving along, we hear from the other side:

Dustin Matocha, chairman of the Young Conservatives of Texas, in response to the ACLU’s upcoming agenda, said that the organization is not teaching strict constructivism — which argues that humans generate knowledge and meaning from their experiences.

So that’s what strict construction is! We’ve had it wrong all these years. And finally:

The Young Conservatives of Texas are supportive of religious freedom, but when you limit yourself to learning about one particular theory, then you’re defeating the whole purpose of science,” Matocha said.

This is gonna be fun. Stay tuned to this blog.

Copyright © 2009. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

6 responses to “Texas Creationism: ACLU Is Getting Involved

  1. …when you limit yourself to learning about one particular theory…

    I swear, the creationists all read from the same playbook. There is no alternative scientific theory to evolution, when will they get it? Ignorance only carries you so far, then you get into willful denial.

  2. James F says: “Ignorance only carries you so far, then you get into willful denial.”

    You say that as if it were a problem. It never seems to bother them.

  3. We could be wrong, but we suspect they’ve never taken a case in defense of the 2nd Amendment or the 10th.

    1. The 2nd Amendment has the NRA to defend it.
    2. As for the 10th Amendment, First hit on Google for aclu “10th amendment”

  4. Modusoperandi says:

    As for the 10th Amendment, First hit on Google for aclu “10th amendment”

    Thanks for that. Not surprising, really. They’ll use any part of the Constitution if it furthers their cause. Where were they with the 10th during the New Deal days? Or the Great Society days? I’ve long maintained that they don’t defend the Constitution — they exploit it. But I’m a grump.

  5. Are they perfect? No. Dredd Scott comes to mind. “Separate but equal”, too. None of this minimizes the fact that you are a grump.

  6. Modusoperandi says: “None of this minimizes the fact that you are a grump.”

    Listen to me, everyone. If you would be happy, you must embrace your inner grump!