WorldNetDaily: A Plea For Theocracy

YOU know what we think of WorldNetDaily (WND). See: WorldNetDaily — Worthless Creationist Rag! They keep confirming our opinion.

To show you what we mean, check out When the godly govern, by Dave Welch — described at the end of the article as the founder and executive director of the U.S. Pastor Council and Houston Area Pastor Council, interdenominational and interracial ministries of and for pastors based in Houston, Texas.

Here are some excerpts from the rev’s article, with bold added by us. He begins with a discussion of the choice of Saul as king of Israel, and then that long-ago event is used to launch into a discussion of our current situation:

What cannot be overlooked is that the entire process was a result of the people rejecting the authority of God over the nation and God granting them their first wish.

The consequences were as clear and catastrophic then as they have been in recent decades in this country as we have done the same. Many point to the U.S. Supreme Court banning prayer in government schools (Engel v. Vital, 1962) and outlawing the Bible (Abington Township School District v. Schempp, 1963) as key turning points.

Others look back to 1925 in the famous “won the battle and lost the war” case that occurred in Dayton, Tenn., as lawyers Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan clashed in the “Scopes Monkey Trial” (State v. Scopes, 1926) over the teaching of evolution in schools.

What’s the connection between all these events? Let’s read on:

The reality is that our struggle against spiritual, moral, cultural and political decline is simply the latest chapter in the war begun when Lucifer rebelled against God, followed by persuading Adam and Eve to disobey God and introducing sin into the permanent condition of the world. Since that day man has been inventing ways to circumvent God, make Him in our image, or ignore Him altogether.

So you see, dear reader, that preventing compulsory school prayer, along with the controversy about teaching evolution in school — these are evils analogous to the sin of Adam and Eve. We’re playing with powerful forces, and our decisions are directly tied into cosmic affairs. We continue:

What we do know is that when men are governed by the God recognized by the ancestors of Western Civilization as Jehovah, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the Holy Trinity of Christianity – love, self-sacrifice, sharing, good works, peace, cultural transformation and political liberty are the fruits.

How does anyone claim to “know” that? We’ve never seen God govern here on earth. But what we really do know is that we’ve enjoyed a lot of liberty since the American Revolution, when the king who ruled by divine right was overthrown. Perhaps the good reverend will clarify things as his essay continues. Here’s more:

In spite of numerous periods where those claiming the name of Christ violated much if not all He taught either ecclesiastically or politically, the historical evidence is that when followers of Jesus Christ live out “all He commanded them” (Matthew 28:22), they brought life, light, hope and bottom-up transformation to the nations.

Got an historical example, rev? Just one will do.

One of the most influential of our founders who never actually set foot on this continent was the Rev. John Robinson, the “Pastor to the Pilgrims.” He was mentor to many, including John Winthrop, author of “Of Plimouth Plantation” and “A Model of Christian Charity” (both vital insights into the faith and character of that courageous congregation) and the first governor of Massachusetts.

Hold it right there, rev! The pilgrims weren’t our founders. They weren’t even the first English colony in North America — that honor goes to Jamestown. The Plymouth settlers were bible communists, at least at first, and those who followed their religious and political traditions ended up hanging witches in Salem. You think they’re our founders, rev? In some cases they may be our ancestors — but founders? No, sorry. See: Salem and Philadelphia: A Tale of Two Cities.

Moving along:

Out of that group came the Mayflower Compact and later the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, the two first written documents of governance that became the cornerstone for every liberty and freedom we have enjoyed since.

Wrong, rev! The Mayflower Compact does have the phrase “just and equal Laws,” which some say is the first mention of what we now think of as “equal protection,” but did you know that the Mayflower Compact was so spectacularly unimportant during the Revolution and later the Constitutional Convention that it wasn’t even mentioned in the Federalist Papers? Hey, read the Mayflower Compact — the text is only seven lines long on our screen, and the first two lines are these:

IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN. We, whose names are underwritten, the Loyal Subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord King James, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, &c. Having undertaken for the Glory of God, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country …

That’s the foundation of our liberty and freedom? You should note, rev, that there’s none of that language in the Constitution. Different people, different philosophy. Different world, really. No wonder we’re so messed up, huh, rev?

Another excerpt from the rev’s essay:

It is critical that pastors once again embrace the sacred duty to choose leaders who will rule in the fear of God as an essential ministry of our local church. We must begin by re-educating most pastors on what Scripture says about it, how our ancestors of the faith have carried it out and how – whether we like it or not – we have the weight of governing on every one of our shoulders as citizens.

Sorry, rev, but how do you plan to “once again” embrace your “sacred duty” to choose our leaders? You guys weren’t very helpful during the Revolution. Clergy played no part we’re aware of in the Constitutional Convention. Of the Signers of the Declaration, only two are described as clergymen. You wouldn’t have liked either of them, rev.

One was John Witherspoon. Wikipedia says: “his most lasting contribution was the initiation of the Scottish Common-Sense Realism, which he had learned by reading Thomas Reid …” Thomas Reid was Scottish philosopher, and a contemporary of David Hume, was the founder of the Scottish School of Common Sense, and played an integral role in the Scottish Enlightenment.

The other clergyman-signer, Lyman Hall, is listed as Physician/Minister. It seems, however, that he was more physician than minister. Wikipedia says: “His pastorate was a stormy one: an outspoken group of parishioners opposed his ordination; in 1751, he was dismissed after charges against his moral character which, according to one biography, “were supported by proof and also by his own confession.” He continued to preach for two more years, filling vacant pulpits, while he studied medicine and taught school.”

And now we come to the end of the rev’s article:

Yes, men of God, that means being involved in the election process at all levels.

It is truly up to us whether the people rejoice because the righteous are in governing authority, or just continue to be angry and frustrated because of the acts of tyrants. The larger question, however, is not about the tyrants. It is whether, as Penn challenged us, we will be governed by God.

You want to rule, rev? Sorry, the Dark Ages are over. So is the colonial period. You’ve hanged your last witch.

Copyright © 2009. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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27 responses to “WorldNetDaily: A Plea For Theocracy

  1. comradebillyboy

    It is always illuminating to watch ‘men of god’ tell lies, distort facts and display an appalling ignorance of their own history.

  2. I think these people are tickled pink that prayer and anti-evolution pseudoscience is banned in public schools. They live to whine, and wouldn’t know what to do with themselves if they actually got their way.

    I say we appoint Ben Stein as the US Supreme Spiritual Leader and see how the WND whiners react.

  3. retiredsciguy

    Frank J says,
    “I say we appoint Ben Stein as the US Supreme Spiritual Leader …”

    How would you like to serve as co-leader, to keep things balanced? Then it would be “Frank & Stein”!

  4. retiredsciguy, hey, I get it. I get it!

  5. Of course, prayer and the bible are not banned in public schools. Prayer lead by government employees, be they teachers or administrators, yes. Proselytizing using bibles or other texts, yes.

  6. Our friends at Little Green Footballs have a link to this thread. Welcome, green people!

  7. What we do know is that when men are governed by the [biblical] God… love, self-sacrifice, sharing, good works, peace, cultural transformation and political liberty are the fruits.

    Except that democracy was invented by the pagan Greeks, the republic was further developed by the pagan Romans, and both were replaced by feudalism in christian Europe. Whoops.

    How myopic do you have to be to ignore every christian government between 200AD and about 1700 AD? Ah, perhaps what he is saying is that we can expect liberty, peace, etc… a mere 1500 years after letting the church take over.

  8. retiredsciguy wrote: “How would you like to serve as co-leader, to keep things balanced? Then it would be ‘Frank & Stein’!”

    Only if they pay me as much as they pay “Shaqula.” 😉

  9. Ha ha ha!

    “What we do know is that when men are governed by the God recognized by the ancestors of Western Civilization as Jehovah, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the Holy Trinity of Christianity – love, self-sacrifice, sharing, good works, peace, cultural transformation and political liberty are the fruits.”

    What we do know is that when governments are controlled by churches/temples/mosques (in the name of God), you get things like the Spanish Inquistion, the extermination of the Cathars in Southern France, suicide bombers, the Crusades, and as Curmie already pointed out, the Salem witch trials.

    I am becoming increasingly convinced of the “appalling ignorance” (thanks Comradebillyboy) of fundamentalist preachers/apologists. They continually get the facts wrong, all while arguing from authority. Weak. Very, very weak.

  10. Sorry, LRA. The comment moderation software is going crazy today. Nothing personal.

  11. You’ve hanged your last witch.

    Wouldst that it were so. If these clowns ever get their hands on the levers of power, I fear it would not be long before they started stringing up those who failed to live up to their “standards.”

    And don’t be surprised if their old friend “Spectral Evidence” makes a return appearance in their star chamber proceedings.

  12. Gabriel Hanna

    What we do know is that when men are governed by the God recognized by the ancestors of Western Civilization as Jehovah, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the Holy Trinity of Christianity – love, self-sacrifice, sharing, good works, peace, cultural transformation and political liberty are the fruits.

    It’s just like Communist apologetics. Communism leads inevitably to equality, brotherhood, economic plenty, freedom, etc–it’s just never been EXECUTED properly.

    Same with this “theocracy” nonsense. Did they forget about “divine right of kings”, or Samuel’s admonition to the Israelites about how their kings would govern them, or the rule of the judges in Israel?

  13. Gabriel Hanna

    agghh, moderation

  14. It’s been a long time since church members thought about their religion (Augustine and others) deeply and rationally.

    The way most people get their god today, is fast, filled with sound bites from the bible and set aside as soon as they click “off” on the remote or walk out the door.

    Truth and consistency are victims.

  15. Gabriel Hanna

    It’s been a long time since church members thought about their religion (Augustine and others) deeply and rationally.

    I think C. S. Lewis worked at it. So did the Pope, before he was the Pope, and I’m sure he continues to do so.

  16. I’ll give you Lewis, mostly and the Pope if you wish. But the Papa is so busy running a mega-corporation, he doesn’t have much time to pass on his wisdom.

  17. Hey, SC, no worries. I figured my post would get through eventually! 🙂

  18. Gabriel Hanna

    I’ll give you Lewis, mostly and the Pope if you wish. But the Papa is so busy running a mega-corporation, he doesn’t have much time to pass on his wisdom.

    I’m pretty sure that’s not what the Pope actually does. I’m pretty sure that the Pope’s role is more ceremonial, and that the actual running of the Church’s various operations is delegated.

    I think this a very good essay, regarding why, if non-Christians are saved, should anyone bother with Christianity. You might have a little more respect for the Pope after reading it.

    http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Christianity/Catholic/2007/01/Are-Non-Christians-Saved.aspx

  19. For those concerned that a theocracy is possible here, the latest info from Pew seems to indicate that religion is in decline. Note especially the full report on Chapter 3 on demographics. Can’t say I’m pleased about this, but on the other hand I understand why people are abandoning a movement that no longer seems to produce any rational thought.

    http://religions.pewforum.org/reports

  20. Gabriel Hanna

    For those concerned that a theocracy is possible here, the latest info from Pew seems to indicate that religion is in decline.

    I’m not worried about theocracy; but I’m not happy that religion is in decline.

    Religion is a source of social norms and moral postulates. It provides vital competition with laws and governments.

    I would be just as unhappy with law being the sole source of morality as I would with religious morality being imposed by law.

  21. retiredsciguy

    After reading the 1964 essay by Joseph Ratzinger (now Pope) linked in Gabriel Hanna’s post above, I have to wonder what the same man would write today.

    And after reading all the comments of the “Regulars” here on Curmy’s blog, one has to be impressed by the level of intelligence of this community of writers. I guess that makes sense – an intelligent blog will attract an intelligent following, and the intelligent comments will attract other intelligent readers, and it builds on itself.
    Thank you, Curmy, for all the research you do to make this possible.

  22. I don’t know why these religious wanna-bes keep going on about how YHVH is the god to follow, I mean jeez, there are a lot much more fun gods out there. Personally I think a country run under the rules of Bacchus would be more fruitful.

  23. Gabriel Hanna wrote: “I’m not worried about theocracy; but I’m not happy that religion is in decline.”

    I too am not worried about theocracy, because I doubt that even devoutly religious Americans will let it happen…but I could be wrong.

    I’m not sure exactly what part of religion is in decline, but IMO organized religion these days is all show and no go. Like a ’78 Mustang II with lots of “boy racer” decals and a lethargic 4-cylinder engine. Meanwhile this “heathen” who hasn’t attended church regularly in 40+ years is like that stripped econobox with a 500 HP V8.

  24. Gabriel Hanna

    I’m not sure exactly what part of religion is in decline, but IMO organized religion these days is all show and no go. Like a ‘78 Mustang II with lots of “boy racer” decals and a lethargic 4-cylinder engine.

    Some religions have become political correctness with God thrown in; nobody has to believe in or do anything. Some religions get all fired up about irrelevancies (from the moral perspective) like evolution.

    I think a good example of a genuinely religious person is Samuel Johnson; a sinner, conscious of his unworthiness before God, with a working intellect, who kept his piety in private. That’s not to say he didn’t talk about God or religion, he did, but he wasn’t ” …as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men”.

  25. Gabriel Hanna

    argh, moderation

  26. Newcomer said:
    “For those concerned that a theocracy is possible here, the latest info from Pew seems to indicate that religion is in decline. Note especially the full report on Chapter 3 on demographics. Can’t say I’m pleased about this, but on the other hand I understand why people are abandoning a movement that no longer seems to produce any rational thought.”

    How many Americans are avowed Marxists? Not too many, but we are getting Marx shoved down our throats in Washington as we speak. Because it is a minority, doesn’t mean Theocrats can be completely ignored. Theocracies and other autocratic systems are rarely largely popular, but there’s still a lot of them.

  27. retiredsciguy

    Gabriel Hanna wrote,
    “…but he wasn’t ” …as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men”.

    Those who wish to insert prayer into all state-sponsored gatherings such as school graduations, sessions of state legislatures, etc. should first read the entire passage from Matthew 6: 5-6:
    “”And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by men. I tell you the truth, they have received their reward in full. 6But when you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.”
    (New International Version)
    Now, I’m not much of a Bible-pounder, but I wish that those who are would read it once in a while. Gotta be the most ignored passage in the whole book.