Kansas Creationism: Other States Are Worse!

EXCEPT for the re-election of Kathy Martin, we haven’t had much creationism news out of Kansas lately. So check this out — it’s somewhat amusing.

In the Wichita Eagle, the largest newspaper in Wichita, Kansas, we read Kansas teachers aren’t anti-evolution. Here are some excerpts, with bold added by us:

A new survey shows Kansas secondary biology teachers have the lowest rates of creationist belief of teachers in any of the states surveyed. The survey results — presented at a September conference of the Kansas Association of Biology Teachers and due to be published in an upcoming Kansas Biology Teacher journal — verify that the general press image of Kansas being backward on evolution is completely opposite of the facts.

The facts are different from the state’s popular image? Even in view of the infinitely stupid Kansas evolution hearings? This should be interesting. Let’s read on:

The percentage of biology teachers from different states who thought that creation has a valid scientific foundation were: Kentucky teachers, 69 percent; Oklahoma, 48 percent; South Dakota, 39 percent; Ohio, 38 percent; Illinois, 30 percent; Georgia, 30 percent; Louisiana, 29 percent; and Kansas, 24 percent.

Aaaaarrrgggh!!!!! We’ll skip the part where the article’s author claims that things in Kansas really aren’t as bad as those numbers indicate, and we’ll continue with this:

A big divide remains between small rural schools and larger Kansas schools. Today, 36 percent of biology teachers at small rural schools (fewer than 100 students) are creationist, while this drops to 15 percent in schools with 100 to 399 students. Rural teachers are more likely to be trained in biology as a “second field” and are less likely to pursue an advanced degree, as they have to teach across many disciplines. Other research finds that small rural Kansas schools are more subject to influence from a few local personalities, while larger schools can pay more attention to state and national standards.

The truly horrible figures are only in rural areas. So what should we conclude — there really isn’t a problem in Kansas? Even one creationist science teacher is too many! Here’s a bit more:

Hard-core opposition to evolution among Kansas biology teachers is probably about 6 percent, dramatically lower than for any other state surveyed.

It’s difficult to gauge “hard-core opposition” but the author has done his best. His civic pride amounts to this: “Other states are even dumber than we are!”

Okay, here’s one last excerpt:

Sadly, that will not stop late-night talk shows from portraying Kansans as anti-evolution hayseeds.

As the creationists are forever telling us, you can’t hide from the truth.

Copyright © 2009. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

12 responses to “Kansas Creationism: Other States Are Worse!

  1. So 24% of Kansas teachers think creation has a valid scientific foundation? And they’re crowing about it?
    I’d be ashamed.

  2. The Curmudgeon wrote:

    His civic pride amounts to this: “Other states are even dumber than we are!”

    What about National Pride? Is there any other developed nation on the planet that has so dense a population of reality-denying Cretards as the good old U S of A?

    It is embarrassing…

  3. Great Claw asks: “What about National Pride?”

    Are you questioning my patriotism? I’m proud of our American creationists. They’re the best creationists in the world. We’re number one!

  4. Gabriel Hanna

    What about National Pride? Is there any other developed nation on the planet that has so dense a population of reality-denying Cretards as the good old U S of A?

    It is embarrassing…

    Other developed nations have their anti-scientific nuttinesses; Germany and GMO food, for example.

    I was thinking today, while running some errands. I was thinking of a dear relative who is unduly enthusiastic about some flavors of physics crackpottery. And I thought of an epigram. I probably didn’t think of it first, so please feel free to spread it as far as possible:

    If you think you know science better than scientists, you must first prove you know science AS WELL as a scientist.

  5. His civic pride amounts to this: “Other states are even dumber than we are!”

    Sort of like the old license plate slogan “Oklahoma is OK.” Perhaps truthful, but not very inspiring.

    Speaking of which: Oklahoma done did better than Kentucky!! W00t!!

  6. carlsonjok says: “Oklahoma done did better than Kentucky!! W00t!!”

    Louisiana did rather well on that survey, only a tad worse than Kansas. They’re all bad.

  7. retiredsciguy

    The key to all this is in the wording of the survey questions. I find it hard to believe that such a high percentage of biology teachers are truly creationist. Perhaps so in private Christian schools, but in public high schools? I dunno.

  8. Gabriel Hanna

    The key to all this is in the wording of the survey questions. I find it hard to believe that such a high percentage of biology teachers are truly creationist. Perhaps so in private Christian schools, but in public high schools? I dunno.

    I don’t know anyone who voted for Nixon, either.

    Most people in this country believe that God created human beings; most people in this country believe in dinosaurs as well. I’m guessing that about 25% picture it as something like B.C., Alley Oop, or the Flinstones.

    If the questions were something like ‘do you think humans were created by God’ 25% seems too low; if they were something like ‘do you believe in Adam and Eve and the Garden of Eden and the Earth is only 6000 years old’ then the number seems too high.

  9. I recall polls which show that the number of Americans who say that God created man some time in the last 10,000 years to be something like 40%.

    But I think that one has to be careful about the nuances of the wording of polls. People do tend to answer the way that makes them look good to the questioner. If you ask a leading question, you’ll get a follower’s answer.

  10. TomS: “But I think that one has to be careful about the nuances of the wording of polls.”

    For 25+ years the Gallup poll has a rather consistent ~45% answering “God created humans in their present form in the last 10000 years.” Another poll I have seen with more rigid “young earth” language showed only ~33% favoring it. Thus Gallup “YEC” results probably include many OECs and even some theistic evolutionists who were “thinking souls, not cells.”

    As for Kansans, it’s worth noting that most of the “experts” who testified at the “Kangaroo Court” admitted being OECs, and some even conceded common descent. More importantly, most tried all sorts of verbal games to avoid answering the questions.

    The lesson that should be learned is that Kansans (the activists at least) are anything but “hayseeds.” The “Kangaroo Court” was brilliant PR. 4 years later activists are still pretending that “Darwnists” chickened out. While we shoot ourselved in the foot calling them “hayseeds.”

  11. Frank J: “As for Kansans, it’s worth noting that most of the “experts” who testified at the “Kangaroo Court” admitted being OECs, and some even conceded common descent. More importantly, most tried all sorts of verbal games to avoid answering the questions.”

    It should also be noted that only one of the scientific “experts” at the 2005 Kangaroo Court (Dr. William H. Harris) was actually from the state of Kansas. The rest had to be brought in from out of state on the taxpayers’ dime.

  12. …Hey be nice to Kansas! Its not so bad down here!

    They taught evolution at my private Christian Kansas school, thank you very much!

    They weren’t so pleased with my religious beliefs, though.

    But still, Kansas isn’t all Young Earth Creationist freaks. There’s just a few here and there.