Kentucky’s 2010 Creationism Bill Is Dead

WE last reported on this here: Kentucky Creationism: New Bill for 2010. That was about House Bill 397, sponsored by Representative Tim Moore (R).

Moore’s bill would have permitted teachers to use “other instructional materials to help students understand, analyze, critique, and review scientific theories in an objective manner, including but not limited to the study of evolution, the origins of life, global warming, and human cloning.” It was similar to the anti-science, anti-evolution, pro-creationism nonsense that became law last year in Louisiana.

Now we learn from our friends at the National Center for Science Education (NCSE) that the Antievolution bill in Kentucky dies. They say that the bill died in committee — which is a fitting end. In other words, it went nowhere.

We searched, but we can’t find anything about this in the usual news sources. That seems appropriate. When a foolish law is passed, that’s news; but when it dies, everything remains normal — and normality usually isn’t newsworthy.

And now your Curmudgeon will boldly make a prediction. It’s a bit of a no-brainer, really. We know that people like Tim Moore never learn, so if he’s back in the legislature next year, he’ll attempt another creationism bill. No doubt about it; he’s on a mission.

Copyright © 2010. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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4 responses to “Kentucky’s 2010 Creationism Bill Is Dead

  1. Could this be it for the year? Mississippi and Kentucky down, Missouri and South Carolina left to go. I don’t put it past Alabama and Michigan to join the fray, of course….

  2. James F says: “Missouri and South Carolina left to go.”

    That’s it at the state level. There are lots of local school board flare-ups, but that’s trivial stuff. And then there’s the Texas situation. The current school board still has to make a final decision on textbooks.

  3. retiredsciguy

    Speaking of Kentucky, home of Ken Ham’s world-infamous Creation Museum — did you happen to catch this story on ABC World News this evening?
    http://abcnews.go.com/WN/evangelical-bible-scholar-spurned-supporting-inclusion-evolutionary-theory/story?id=10395181

    Seems as though the creationists are practicing “Expulsions” as well. they find Dr. Bruce Waltke guilty of rational sanity. Quoting Dr. Waltke, a “respected conservative evangelical bilble scholar”, “If the data is overwhelmingly in favor of evolution, to deny that reality will make us a cult — some odd group that is not really interacting with the world.”

    According to the news story, Ken Ham has vehemently opposed Waltke’s proposition. Guess he doesn’t want to have to go to all that trouble revising his museum’s displays.

  4. According to the news story, Ken Ham has vehemently opposed Waltke’s proposition. Guess he doesn’t want to have to go to all that trouble revising his museum’s displays.

    That’s rich. A flimflam man like Ham criticizing a widely respected scholar and Harvard Ph.D. like Prof. Waltke. But then again, education is corrosive to creationism.