Creationism in Northern Ireland Inspires Humor

THE situation we described in Creationism in Northern Ireland is being widely discussed on the internet. Northern Ireland’s culture minister, Nelson McCausland, wants the Ulster Museum to include information about creationism and intelligent design. He says that the inclusion of anti-Darwinian theories in the museum is “a human rights issue.”

When a politician makes a world-class jackass of himself, it’s only natural that there should be a rollicking response. McCausland has made himself a target, so now he’ll have to bear the inevitable barrage of mockery he has provoked.

We found an intelligent column with some especially amusing commentary, so we’ll bring a few excerpts to your attention. It’s titled Could Nelson’s idea be the start of something?, by Malachi O’Doherty, a journalist, author, and broadcaster in Northern Ireland. It appears in the Belfast Telegraph. The bold font was added by us:

In short, if Mr McCausland wants the museum to offer discussion of intelligent design theory, let them do it. There are a lot of people among us who believe that religion can still hold out against scientific discovery. They would have been on the side of the Pope against Galileo and they still think they can refute Darwin.

Presumably, what follows is about the “fine tuning” argument that claims the universe is designed:

If they are hopeful that intelligent design restores the Christian explanation of the Universe to them, then they may be well-served by having the full case and its implications laid out for them.

The problem for creationists is that their argument, if won, might only establish that an intelligence initiated the big bang. For all they know, that intelligent being might have been killed in the blast.

Hey, that’s funny! The author continues to discuss the cosmic fine tuner:

He, she or it may reside still in another universe and have lost all interest in this one. There are no grounds for supposing that that being knows about us, or has benign intentions towards us.

There are no grounds even for supposing that it is an infinite deity. There may be another universe in which children spark off big bangs with their chemistry sets. They may not even know that they are doing it.

They will live in a different timeframe, so our whole span of existence in this universe may be just a blink to them. The problem for intelligent design freaks is that they don’t read enough science fiction.

Those are the best lines, in our humble opinion. But the whole thing is worth a read. Click over there and check it out.

Copyright © 2010. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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5 responses to “Creationism in Northern Ireland Inspires Humor

  1. From the article: “The problem for creationists is that their argument, if won, might only establish that an intelligence initiated the big bang. For all they know, that intelligent being might have been killed in the blast.”

    What’s not funny for any Biblical literalist pinning their hopes on the DI, is that (1) they clearly do not rule that out as a possibility, and (worse) (2) that is the closest to any “official” position they might have, despite all their politically correct language, obviously chosen to keep YECs and OECs in the big tent.

    Think about it, while Behe once speculated that the designer could have built a first ancestral cell, he backpedaled from that, but not toward any more Genesis-friendly account. Later Dembski speculated that the Big Bang could have been “the” design actuation event. And none of the more Genesis-friendly “Discoveroids” (Wells, Nelson) challenged them directly. Finally Behe admitted under oath at Dover that the designer could be among the deceased.

    The problem is that very few evolution-deniers know that, and even ~1/2 of those who don’t are so deluded that they wouldn’t care anyway. Any feel-good sound bite against “Darwinism” gives them their fix, even if it contradicts another feel-good sound bite against “Darwinism”.

  2. Frank J says:

    What’s not funny for any Biblical literalist pinning their hopes on the DI, is that (1) they clearly do not rule that out as a possibility …

    It’s interesting to think of the magical Designer-Fine Tuner as some kind of cosmic suicide bomber who perished in the Big Bang. It has rhetorical possibilities.

  3. Once you start with the premise that [Sacred Text Of Choice] is inerrant, you can accommodate any amount of discordant thought. You just need a Miracle Button for whenever the tension builds up.

    And that’s where the creotards really mess up. If they simply stuck to the Miracle line, they wouldn’t tie themselves up in knots. (Catholics manage this quite nicely wrt transubstantiation).

    But no, the really dumb ones (I’m looking at you, McLeroy) insist on pushing the miracles to the background (why? Do they not like God?), and coming up with whackaloon explanation for how Noah dealt with 23 tones of manure an hour by training up the chimps to use shovels.

    It provides enormous opportunity for cruel pointing and laughing, and I’m very grateful to them for doing it.

  4. Gabriel Hanna

    the really dumb ones (I’m looking at you, McLeroy) insist on pushing the miracles to the background (why? Do they not like God?), and coming up with whackaloon explanation for how Noah dealt with 23 tones of manure an hour by training up the chimps to use shovels.

    This is called “euhemerization”, when you try to explain a myth in terms of something that could actually have happened. My Oxford Study Bible does this in the Pentateuch, trying to explain where the frogs and blood plagues and manna could have come from.

    It’s a miracle, and I don’t worry about it.

  5. Michael Fugate

    I was under the impression that ID was about the overthrow of materialism/naturalism not about the literal truth of the Bible. Its adherents want us to believe that something nonnatural is controlling things, or in other words, everything is beyond our control.