Oklahoma Creationism: Governor’s Race and More

WE haven’t been watching creationist events in Oklahoma since Anna Falling’s thrilling race for mayor of Tulsa in 2009. See: Anna Falling Fails, Is Tulsa Doomed?

We’ve previously kept an eye on Republican State Senator Randy Brogdon, who could usually be depended upon to introduce creationist legislation every year, as he did in 2009. His efforts have so far have gone nowhere. See: Creationist Oklahoma Legislator Throws Tantrum. We had some forewarning last year in Tulsa World that Brogdon had ambitions for higher office, but we didn’t pay much attention. See: Brogdon assessing bid for governor.

Today we have some news to report. In the Tulsa Beacon of Tulsa, Oklahoma we read Heavy Republican primary slate dwarfs Democrat ballot. Here are some excerpts, with bold added by us:

While Republicans must sort through up to 18 races on the July 27 primary ballot, Democrats could see as few as five races next Tuesday.

Republicans will vote on governor, lieutenant governor, state auditor and inspector, attorney general, state treasurer, school superintendent, labor commissioner, insurance commissioner, corporation commissioner, U.S. senator, U.S. representative, Tulsa County commissioners, Tulsa County assessor, Tulsa County treasurer and district judges.

The primary election is next week. Let’s read on to see what interests us:

The GOP ballot will [present] these contests:

State Sen. Randy Brogdon of Owasso faces U.S. Rep. Mary Fallin with Roger Jackson and Robert Hubbard in the race for the Republican nomination for governor.

Fallin, a former lieutenant governor who has held public office for 20 years, is the favorite of the Republican establishment. Brogdon, who ran a heat/air business for 30 years, has drawn support from the Tea Party movement for his stand on expanding freedom and restoring the constitutional balance between the states and the federal government.

Jackson, Oklahoma City, said he will work to end Oklahoma’s fiscal crisis. Hubbard is a ranch owner with ties to Oklahoma’s horse industry.

Brogdon is going for it! He’s a flaming, full-blown, flat-out creationist, and he’s got Tea Party support. Here’s his campaign website: Brogdon for Governor. We don’t know about his GOP opponents; nor do we know about the other GOP races. Let’s continue:

Democrats will have an easier time, with only five races on the standard primary ballot.

[…]

Sen. Susan Paddack faces fellow Democrat Jerry Combrink for superintendent of public instruction.

Paddack has a masters of education degree from East Central University and at one point taught science in middle and high schools in Texas, Colorado and Oklahoma. The Democrat Whip, she serves on the Senate’s Education Committee.

Combrink says he has 40 years of combined classroom and education administrative experience. According to his website, he believes in intelligent design but intelligent design, the biblical story of Creation and the theory of evolution should be taught in public schools.

Here’s his campaign website: Jerry Combrink for State Superintendent. If you click on the “Issues” tab you’ll find a list of questions. This is what you’ll find if you click on number 13 — There is an intense debate as to what should be taught in the classroom concerning creationism, evolution, or intelligent design. Where do you stand on this issue?:

I personally believe that intelligent design was the creating force of the universe However, in a school setting; I believe that all three processes should be taught and allow the students to make up their own mind. They should be aware of the different theories and strengths and weaknesses of each. [Punctuation and capitalization are as they appear in the original.]

We haven’t looked into the views of his opponent, or any of the other Democrat races. We’ve seen enough to know that next week’s primary in Oklahoma will be an interesting one — especially regarding Brogdon’s race for the governorship.

Update: Both creationists lost. See Oklahoma Creationism: July 2010 Primary Results.

Copyright © 2010. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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23 responses to “Oklahoma Creationism: Governor’s Race and More

  1. retiredsciguy

    Evidently, Jerry Combrink hasn’t heard of Kitzmiller v. Dover, or he thinks Oklahome can get a different result in a federal court, or just doesn’t care.

  2. Jerry Combrink: “I personally believe that intelligent design was the creating force of the universe However, in a school setting; I believe that all three processes should be taught and allow the students to make up their own mind. They should be aware of the different theories and strengths and weaknesses of each.”

    In fairness, if I were not a scientist, and thus didn’t understand the technical definitions of “processes” and “theories,” I might likely have said the same thing.

    Even now I’m all for students learning the weaknesses of ID and Biblical creationism in a non-science class. And even the “weaknesses” of evolution, as long as they are taught in context, which of course no anti-evolution activist would dare do.

    I’ll bet that by now some anti-evolution activist has warned Combrink against advocating teaching weaknesses of ID and Biblical creationism. If he rejects their advice, there might be some hope for him.

  3. retiredsciguy: “Evidently, Jerry Combrink hasn’t heard of Kitzmiller v. Dover…”

    I’m often surprised at how few people ever heard of KvD, including those who appear to know a lot about the “controversy.”

  4. carlsonjok

    Brogdon won’t win. Fallin is way out ahead.

  5. Brogdon authored the ‘Academic Freedom Act’ last year. We were able to get one Republican on the Senate Education Committee to join the Democrats to defeat the bill by one vote. In the committee hearing Brogdon said he “carefully crafted the bill himself; actually, the bill was drafted by the DI gang and was almost identical to the bill passed in Louisiana. Brogdon also said that he had talked with science teachers in his district (Owasso, OK) and that they had a problem with teaching evolution. The OK Supt. of Education said in the committee hearing that she had not heard of problems there and later, in an editorial, The Tulsa World,reported that the local school superintendent stated there was no problem and opposed the bill. Such lies are characteristic of Randy Brogdon.

    We in Oklahoma suffer such fools and try hard to counter them, but it is getting more difficult – just look at the Oklahoma Congressional delegation with jerks like Inhofe and Coburn – worst in the country.

  6. carlsonjok says: “Brogdon won’t win.”

    I donno. If all the Noah’s Ark voters in Oklahoma support him, they have a chance.

  7. Thanks for the input, vhutchison (or perhaps I should say “Victor”). Hey everybody, check out Oklahomans for Excellence in Science Education.

  8. vhutchison: “In the committee hearing Brogdon said he “carefully crafted the bill himself; actually, the bill was drafted by the DI gang and was almost identical to the bill passed in Louisiana. ”

    I’d like to hear what those Discoveroids who accused Judge Jones of “plagiarism” (when he did what most judges do, by quoting trial participants in his decision) have to say about that. I’m betting double standard.

  9. Frank J says: “I’m betting double standard.”

    Creationists have only one standard — creationism. Nothing else matters. No matter how many lies they tell, in their own minds they’re remaining true to their principles.

  10. carlsonjok

    If all the Noah’s Ark voters in Oklahoma support him, they have a chance.

    Don’t be so sure. Sarah Palin, in her latest attempt to stack up chits for 2012 by endorsing the existing front runner, has slapped the Wasilla Seal of Approval on Mary Fallin (who was already leading Brogdon 59% to 10.2%). That oughta seal the deal, but feel free to try and refudiate me.

  11. No refudiation neede[d]. “Back-seat Mary” will likely win the primary, but either way, Oklahoma loses.

  12. carlsonjok says:

    Sarah Palin… has slapped the Wasilla Seal of Approval on Mary Fallin …

    That being the case, I agree that Brogdon should be toast. But this is all very curious. Palin is the darling of the Tea Party, and Brogdon is said to have their support. Palin is a creationist (but a non-aggresive one), yet she doesn’t endorse Brogdon. With both creationism and the Tea Party on his side, Palin endorses Brogdon’s opponent. Nothing is as predictable as the pundits would have us believe.

  13. carlsonjok

    Nothing is as predictable as the pundits would have us believe.

    Actually, as a regular reader of Andrew Sullivan, I would point out that he has noticed that Palin is mainly only endorsing the front runners in the Republican primaries. Sorta reminds me of Jesse Jackson in a way. It was always said that Jackson would run around the block to get to the front of a parade that had already left without him.

    Back-seat Mary, Vic? I am not sure I want to know the story behind that one.

  14. carlsonjok: The political cognoscenti in OK know what the ‘back-seat’ item refers to, but you can surely guess! It includes reference to State Trooper.

  15. vhutchison says:

    The political cognoscenti in OK know what the ‘back-seat’ item refers to, but you can surely guess!

    I used to date a girl who would have qualified for that nickname. All of us did. She married a dentist. All of them do.

  16. carlsonjok

    Oh, now I remember! Another family values Republican!

  17. retiredsciguy

    carlsonjok :
    “Oh, now I remember! Another family values Republican!”

    Hey! Gotta start a family one way or another!

    Seriously, though, I clicked over to the OESE website. Having vhutchison as a contributor really classes up your blog, Curmy.

  18. retiredsciguy says:

    Having vhutchison as a contributor really classes up your blog, Curmy.

    We could certainly use some class around here.

  19. Curmudgeon: “Creationists have only one standard — creationism.”

    Which we know means that they willingly employ double standards, contradict each other, cover up fatal weaknesses of their “theories,” etc.

    But I’m afraid that most non-creationists still don’t get that, but instead define “creationism” as an honest, innocent belief in one particular long-discredited fairy tale. Which it may have been 150 years ago, but not any more.

  20. Oklahoma Passes Creationism Bill
    Science books used in Oklahoma schools will be required to state that ‘human life was created by one God of the universe.’
    Science books used in Oklahoma public schools will be required to state “that human life was created by one God of the universe” under legislation passed by the Oklahoma House of Representatives.

  21. owasso homes, that was back in 2000. Got any other hot news for us?

  22. The 2000 bill that passed the House did not become law. Creationist bills that reach the floor of the House and Senate often pass, but fail along the way. In 2000 Attorney General Drew Edmondson also ruled against the State Textbook Committee that tried to place an evolution disclaimer in textbooks. The Textbook Committee had been stuffed with known creationists by appointment from then Republican Governor Keating. Since that time the Committee has been realigned by appointments from Demo Governor. What the future holds, however, remains uncertain, given the possibility that OK will have a Republican Governor and both houses dominated by Republicans, most far-right fundamentalists. Current races are dominated by Repubs loudly advertising their ‘Christian’ conservatism.
    OK was the only state in the last presidential election where EVERY county went for McClain! This is quite a change from the history of the state that was once fairly populist and overwhelmigly Democratic,