The Butler Act, Your Clock, and Uranus

There are times, dear reader, when the universe seems to be telling us something, and today is one of those times. Consider these facts:

On this date, 13 March, in 1781, William Herschel discovered the seventh planet of the solar system — Uranus.

On this date, 13 March, in 1925, the Butler Act was passed in the Tennessee Senate, which prohibited the theory of evolution from being taught in that state. Having previously passed in the House, it was signed into law a week later. John Scopes was charged with violating the law on 05 May of that year, resulting in the Scopes Trial.

On this date, 13 March, we all reset our clocks in mindless, servile obedience to the tyrannical Uniform Time Act, a topic about which we’ve previously written. See: Creationism and Daylight Saving Time.

If that grand, triple coincidence doesn’t convince you of intelligent design, then nothing will.

Copyright © 2011. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

18 responses to “The Butler Act, Your Clock, and Uranus

  1. Argued like a true creationist.

  2. A little related 13 March story . . . on this day in 1930, Clyde Tombaugh, at the Lowell Observatory in Arizona, discovered the former planet Pluto.

    At what time, Daylight Savings time, or Mountain Standard time, is unclear.

  3. waldteufel says:

    A little related 13 March story . . . on this day in 1930, Clyde Tombaugh, at the Lowell Observatory in Arizona, discovered the former planet Pluto.

    Ah yes, Pluto. A flash in the pan — like Darwin! Actually, I was hoping to find something about the Discoveroids that happened on this date, but I can’t locate any online chronology.

  4. There is another relationship between Pluto and Uranus besides official discovery dates. Pluto actually comes closer in its orbit to Uranus than it does to Neptune. Due to it’s 2:3 orbital resonance with Neptune, it always passes through Neptune’s orbit when Neptune is at a distance., and it happens that the distance is greater than it’s closest approach to Uranus.

    There is a rather cool simulation of it’s orbit with respect to Neptune and Uranus here. http://www.orbitsimulator.com/gravity/articles/pluto.html

    Another example of the careful, ordered design of the solar system.

  5. Ed says:

    Pluto actually comes closer in its orbit to Uranus than it does to Neptune.

    Your Darwinist science may permit Pluto to approach Uranus, but this is an abomination and I won’t allow it.

  6. Make it a quadruple coinkydink: An episode of “The Wonder Years” circa 1990 made fun of a nerdy science teacher who kept saying “Uraaaanus.” The teacher was played by Ben “Expelled” Stein.

  7. This is getting really weird. Just found out that today is L. Ron Hubbard’s 100th birthday.

  8. Two more 13 March coincidences, but they’re positive events:

    In 1610 on that date, Galileo published his observations of the night sky under the title “Siderius Nuncius” (Starry Messenger).

    In 1733 on that date, Joseph Priestly was born. He discovered oxygen.

  9. LOL, SC.
    I mindlessly and servilely moved my clocks forward last night.

    I do dislike it for a week or so. I hate waking up in the dark, but I love the light later in the evening. Now my daughter and I can eat our meals outside on mild evenings, we can go for longer walks and she can practice riding her bike. We don’t have very long before it gets really hot here in NC, so the more time we get to enjoy a lovely spring, the better.

  10. Lynn Wilhelm says: “I mindlessly and servilely moved my clocks forward last night.”

    Forward? You moved your clocks forward? Egad, I’ve done it wrong!

  11. It seems you are a real rebel, Curmie!

  12. “The Butler Act, Your Clock, and Uranus”

    I waited in vain for the punchline which I expected to involve shoving your clock up Uranus. The Butler Act forbids performing unnatural acts on one’s person, I assume?

  13. Gabriel Hanna

    @Lynn: Now my daughter and I can eat our meals outside on mild evenings, we can go for longer walks and she can practice riding her bike.

    You could have done all those things last week, too; the clock would have shown a different number when you did them, is all.

  14. Gabriel Hanna

    When the clocks go back, the trains stop for one hour. When the clocks go forward, they just run as fast as they can until they catch up. What a stupid system.

  15. Gabriel Hanna says:

    When the clocks go back, the trains stop for one hour. When the clocks go forward, they just run as fast as they can until they catch up.

    I think you’ve got something there to resolve Jason’s “instant starlight” problem. Maybe, during Day Four of Genesis, everything was briefly on Universal Saving Time.

  16. I once asked why we are still doing the spring forward/ fall back thing seeing as how it was originally supposed to benefit farmers and we don’t live in an agrarian society anymore… I was told that it is now a replacement for a sound energy policy (meaning, it somehow magically saves energy resources).

    True or no? Sounds like bunk to me. So, why are we still doing it?

  17. LRA says: “Sounds like bunk to me.”

    At least 90% of what government does is bunk, so you’re probably not wrong.

  18. Gabriel Hanna

    @LRA: Daylight time was not invented for the benefit of farmers. It is absolutely useless for anyone who lives and works by the sun, which is why it was not adopted until WWI. After WWI, the US went off daylight time because most people were rural and derived no benefit from it. It wasn’t until WWII that it was readopted and “stuck”, in some places, the country being urbanized by then. It wasn’t adopted by the Federal government until 1966.

    http://www.snopes.com/science/daylight.asp