Chris Christie Ducks Creationism Question Again

Last week we wrote New Jersey Governor Chris Christie: Creationist? The New Jersey Governor, considered a potential (but reluctant) Republican candidate for President, had said that teaching creationism should be decided by local school boards.

The press isn’t leaving the issue alone. In the Star-Ledger, one of the newspapers hosted at NJ.com, “the online home of Jersey’s 12 largest and most prominent newspapers,” we read Gov. Christie won’t say if he believes in evolution or creationism. Here is one excerpt, with bold font added by us:

Gov. Chris Christie refused to comment when asked if he believes in evolution or the theory of creationism when asked at a press conference earlier today.

“That’s none of your business,” Christie said.

What’s going on here? We’ll tell you what your Curmudgeon thinks. If Christie were content with being Governor of New Jersey, then why should he care about disclosing his opinion about evolution and creationism? It wouldn’t have any effect because he’s already been elected Governor. But he’s not content with that office.

We think Christie is going to run for President and he doesn’t want to alienate the hard-core creationist GOP base. There’s no other explanation. Christie’s in the Presidential race. You heard it here first.

Copyright © 2011. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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10 responses to “Chris Christie Ducks Creationism Question Again

  1. Saying that his opinion is none of our business suggests that he thinks that it is a religious opinion. There is some justification for saying that one’s religious opinions are no one else’s business.
    Are the creationists going to be appreciative of his saying that creationism is a religious opinion?

  2. I believe a Republican stating that he believes in evolution is much more problematic for his chances as a candidate than stating that he believes in creation, given the current religious right influence on the party.

  3. longshadow

    We think Christie is going to run for President and he doesn’t want to alienate the hard-core creationist GOP base. There’s no other explanation. Christie’s in the Presidential race. You heard it here first.

    There’s another possibility: he NOT running in 2012, but wants to keep his options open in the future; ergo, why say anything that can be used at a later date to oppose him?

    He’s playing this smart — in the political sense of the word.

  4. Longie says:

    There’s another possibility: he NOT running in 2012, but wants to keep his options open in the future

    You still heard it here first.

  5. Have you seen the Zogby poll? Of course, the unelectable Ron Paul is third, so take it with a grain of salt.

    http://zogby.com/news/2011/05/10/ibope-zogby-poll-cain-now-second-christie-top-choice-gop-primary-voters-/

  6. So far as I’m concerned, once you are in public office, it becomes my business.

  7. longshadow wrote:

    There’s another possibility: he NOT running in 2012, but wants to keep his options open in the future; ergo, why say anything that can be used at a later date to oppose him?

    Yeah…and it pains me deeply that acknowledging scientific reality is a detriment in modern American politics.

  8. comradebillyboy

    Can a modern republican politician ever admit to accepting modern scientific models of physical reality and still be OK with the religious right base?

  9. Curmudgeon: “There’s no other explanation. Christie’s in the Presidential race. You heard it here first.”

    And if so he will not get my vote in the Republican primary. Unless he retracts the “none of your business” nonsense and admits that evolution is the only valid explanation, and the only one that ought to be taught. I’m almost positive that he privately accepts evolution and knows that there’s no “theory of creationism,” but I give it about a 1 in 10^40000 chance that he actually admits it.

  10. Comradebillyboy: “Can a modern republican politician ever admit to accepting modern scientific models of physical reality and still be OK with the religious right base?”

    Many do admit accepting evolution, including those like McCain who still nevertheless think that “alternatives” should be taught. While those politicians are aware that they might be trading many religious-far-right votes for a few scientist votes, if they are with the religious-far-right on more important issues like abortion, I guess that many (most?) of those voters would hold their nose and vote for them anyway. Especially if their own kids are homeschooled or attend fundamentalist schools.