Kentucky Experiences the “Hambo Effect”

It’s well-known that like-minded people want to cluster together, and this maxim certainly applies to creationists.

As all of you know, Kentucky is home to Answers in Genesis (AIG) — one of the major sources of young-earth creationist wisdom. It’s the online creationist ministry of Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo), the Australian entrepreneur who has become the ayatollah of Appalachia. It’s also the home of AIG’s infamous, mind-boggling Creation Museum — the North American Mecca for the mindless.

Not only that, but if Hambo can ever raise the funds, Kentucky will also be the home of Ark Encounter, the latest project of AIG. It’ll be a “full size” replica of Noah’s Ark.

With all that, you might think that Kentucky is saturated with creationist attractions, but you’d be wrong. There may be more on the way, inspired by ol’ Hambo’s example. That’s what we call the “Hambo Effect,” and here’s the story:

We found it in the Guardian, one of the major British newspapers. The Brits love to write stories about creationism in the US, and that’s where we read Creationists plan yet another museum for northern Kentucky. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

A stretch of interstate in northern Kentucky may soon be the official capital for creationism fans across the globe.

We think it’s a good idea to have these things in a recognizable cluster. They’ll be happy, it’ll be a great convenience for those who visit, and the rest of us can avoid the blighted region. The Guardian story continues.

Online-only institution the Creation Science Hall of Fame hopes to establish a real-life creationism center located between the Creation Museum and planned creationism theme park Ark Encounter.

Great idea! They won’t even have to advertize very much, because Hambo’s already attracting visitors to the region. Oh, here’s the website for the Creation Science Hall of Fame. Let’s read on:

The hall of fame website was launched in February and honors “those who honored God’s word as literally written in Genesis.” Any scientist who the institution believes furthers the scientifically inaccurate idea that God created the world 6,000 years ago can be included.

The Guardian couldn’t help being snarky. We know what you’re thinking, dear reader. You’re dreaming that one day, you too might be included among those illustrious geniuses in the creationist Hall of Fame. It could happen — if you lose your mind. We continue:

There are several creationism institutions in the US, including another creation museum in Texas and a mobile museum that takes fossil exhibits to churches and schools. The hall of fame would solidify northern Kentucky as the center for creation-tourism.

The citizens of that state must be so proud! Here’s more:

Creation Science Hall of Fame organizers are asking for between $2m and $3m and would feature biographies, pictures, and artifacts of inductees.

Three million bucks for a collection of pictures and biographies? Hey, why not? Moving along:

Their website honors 104 deceased male scientists including Leonardo Da Vinci, Michael Faraday and Guglielmo Marconi. To explain why these individuals are included, the site excerpts biography information from the book Men of Science, Men of God, written by a man widely recognized as the father of creationism, Henry Morris.

Henry Morris? BWAHAHAHAHAHA!

So there you are. We wish these promoters well. They’ll be a good neighbor for ol’ Hambo, and a great addition to the intellectual culture of Kentucky.

Copyright © 2012. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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10 responses to “Kentucky Experiences the “Hambo Effect”

  1. I think all of the dead as well as the living “scientists” on their site are also included in the Dissent from Darwin list of the Dishonesty Institute.

  2. Charles Deetz ;)

    I jumped for the obvious and checked out <a href="http://creationsciencehalloffame.org/deceased/leonardo-da-vinci/"Leonardo's entry. Not one word about why he was a creationist.

    And googling for more, CreationWiki doesn’t say anything about it either. The about call him a deist.

    If you are conscripting dead people who lived 500 years ago into the creationist war, you could at least have some sliver of facts besides ‘Henry Morris said so’.

  3. Charles Deetz said:

    If you are conscripting dead people who lived 500 years ago into the creationist war, you could at least have some sliver of facts

    Facts? Why do they need facts!?!? My God, man, don’t you realize they have the Bible!?!? That’s all The Truth ™ they need!

  4. Thanks to Charles Deetz, for the link to the Creation wiki — which is wonderfully hilarious. Here’s part of their ‘article’ on da Vinci:

    He had many great contributions to science and even to art. One of them was the invention of a giant catapult. This helped out the military a lot, and gave them a huge advantage.

    Isn’t that precious!

  5. Altogether, the creation of a “Creationist Hall of Fame” is a plus for our side, because they put all their racists and Nazis in one basket for us to knock down.

    One of the first inductees is Jerry Bergman, a pathological liar and non-scientist (he’s not even remotely a scientist) who is currently touting his own books on Amazon, using the Amazon sock puppet identities “Darwin Researcher” and “The Professor” to give his own books 5-star reviews and praise his genius while pretending not to be himself. In the 1980’s Bergman wrote a letter to a KKK newspaper saying that blacks always got jobs ahead of him and weeping about his oppression as a white man. He is appropriate as an inductee to the Creationist Hall of Fame.

    I read Morris’ Men of Science, Men of God. The usual Morris cover-up, in which he ignores the extreme racism of his creationist heroes, like Louis Agassiz and Cuvier, and Werner von Braun’s Nazism. (He also considers Charles Piazzi Smyth, the wacky pyramidologist, a “great scientist”. Smyth was in the British-Israel movement– they believe the English and Americans are the lost tribes of Israel– and Morris does refer obliquely to Smyth’s racism.)

    If someone is famous and dead, Morris’ standard for “creationist” is extremely loose. For example, he includes Leonardo da Vinci as “creationist” because da Vinci painted religious scenes, that must mean he’s creationist (although of course da Vinci found fossil marine animals on mountaintops and said they could NOT be put there by a global flood.) Louis Pasteur is listed as a creationist, though no evidence is cited; though I understand it is debatable that Pasteur was anti-evolution.

    If someone is creationist, Morris’ standard for “great scientist” is extremely loose. As already mentioned, he lists Piazzi Smyth as a “great scientist”, though pyramidology is a pseudoscience a step above Sasquatchology. Morris also lists Salem’s Cotton Mather, the witch detective, who denounced his neighbors as witches after they were dead, as a “great scientist.” He’s scraping the bottom of the barrel.

    Of course Morris lists that Nazi creationist Werner von Braun, though his achievements were in rocket engineering, not scientific experimentation or theory. His past as a Nazi mass murderer of civilians is whitewashed.

    So yes, it’s great that they made a Creationist Hall of Fame and let’s hope their Nazi and racist heroes are prominently displayed so we can remind people what creationism is about.

  6. Charles Deetz ;)

    @Diogenes Thanks for the added insight.

    To your last statement about ‘prominently displayed’, I can only imagine run-of-the-mill creationists looking at these people’s bios and wondering the same thing we are … what were their real contributions? If this is the best, how empty and lame the whole creationist movement must be.

  7. With the fast and loose criteria they use to incorporate someone into their hall of fame Darwin himself would qualify.

  8. Poor Kentucky. This story reminded me of a brilliant watercolor illustration (by Hermann Mejia) called something like “You Can’t Darwin ’em All.” It ran in MAD #485 (Sept. 2008), in a feature called “The 20 Dumbest People, Events and Things of 2007.” A parody of the movie poster from Night at the Museum, Darwin is shown running screaming from the Creation Museum, surrounded by madly anachronistic exhibits (Moses riding a Tyrannosaur, Eve feeding apples to a pterodactyl, etc.) I can’t find a scan of it online, cuss it, or else I’d link to it. But it’s certainly funny enough to be worth seeking out. I always wanted to send it to PZ Myers, to use in his slide show lectures.

  9. @Neon:
    This story reminded me of a brilliant watercolor illustration (by Hermann Mejia) called something like “You Can’t Darwin ‘em All.” It ran in MAD #485 (Sept. 2008), in a feature called “The 20 Dumbest People, Events and Things of 2007.” A parody of the movie poster from Night at the Museum, Darwin is shown running screaming from the Creation Museum, surrounded by madly anachronistic exhibits (Moses riding a Tyrannosaur, Eve feeding apples to a pterodactyl, etc.) I can’t find a scan of it online, cuss it

    At Pharyngula

    Another link

  10. Hah! I should’ve known PZ would be hip.