Discoveroids Develop Their Coppedge Narrative

After the Discoveroids’ initial stunned reaction to the results of the Coppedge case (which you can see here), following which their blog was silent for the entire weekend, they’ve said nothing about the Coppedge case — until now.

But first we ought to give you some background. You already know about the trial court’s decision in the David Coppedge case. And you know that the Discoveroids — described in the Cast of Characters section of our Intro page — inhabit what can only be described as an alternate universe.

It’s not just that their silly arguments are based mostly on fallacies like the god of the gaps and the watchmaker analogy. We’ve discussed that several times, most recently here. Nor is it that they’re mimicking the world of science by setting up their own captive “peer reviewed” journal (BIO-Complexity), and their own creation science lab (Biologic Institute), and their own “peer reviewed” vanity press operation (Discovery Institute Press). Their imitation of the accouterments of science has been described by one of our readers as a cargo cult. Richard Feynman has previously used the term cargo cult science to describe this kind of behavior — but his examples were far less elaborate than the behavior of the Discoveroids.

Now it occurs to us that besides behaving like Pacific islanders who engage in (as Wikipedia describes it) “ritualistic practices such as building crude imitation landing strips, aircraft and radio equipment, and mimicking the behavior that they had observed of the military personnel operating them,” the Discoveroids have also developed their own system of jurisprudence which crudely parallels the legal system in which they attempt to prevail. But in the Discoveroids’ own system, their arguments are always winners.

We’ve seen their alternate legal system in their numerous articles criticizing both the factual findings and the legal conclusions in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District. Now they’re engaging in the same behavior regarding the Coppedge case. Behold their latest blog article: At Pro-Darwin Blogs, Knee-Jerk Responses to the David Coppedge Intelligent Design Case Validate Discrimination Claims. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us, and their links omitted:

At pro-Darwinian evolution blogs like Ars Technica and Panda’s Thumb, we see Darwin activists rejoicing over the tentative verdict in the Coppedge case. The judge has expressed his intent to rule in favor of Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL). One comment at Panda’s Thumb simply says, “Rejoice.”

Blog comments? They’re worried about blog comments? That stuff isn’t nearly as pernicious as the articles published by Discoveroid “fellows” (see Discovery Institute: Hitler, Hitler, Hitler, Part V). Let’s return to the latest Discoveroid article:

Actually, many of the comments at these websites express contradictory views. On one hand, they praise the court for finding that JPL was justified in demoting and then terminating David Coppedge. On the other hand, they say that Coppedge ought to have been let go because of his pro-ID views. In other words, the comments themselves demonstrate the kind of intolerance that is directed against ID proponents in academic settings. Even if you were you unfamiliar with all the rest of the evidence we have documented here, this by itself would seem to confirm that a basic and crucial claim of Coppedge’s case — that there is intolerance towards ID proponents in the scientific community — is correct.

We don’t see much contradiction here — but even if there were such, so what? Blog comments aren’t — ahem! — intelligently designed to be a coherent, consistent argument. They’re just random comments. But of course, the Discoveroids see design everywhere. Then they give several examples of blog comments that aren’t complimentary to Coppedge — as if this were some kind of courtroom evidence for their alternate-universe view of what happened at JPL, and then they say:

If the irony isn’t already obvious to you, here’s what it is: These folks are rejoicing and claiming that justice was served because Coppedge lost both his job and his lawsuit. Meanwhile they claim that Coppedge deserved to be fired simply because he was a “creationist,” or supported intelligent design, or perhaps even because of his Christian religious views. But if this sort of animus is why Coppedge was demoted and forced out of JPL, then it shows Coppedge deserves to win, and should never have been terminated in the first place.

Aha! Blog comments show that Coppedge deserves to win. You don’t need us to explain how ridiculous that is. Oh, wait — even the Discoveroids dimly sense it. They say:

Now obviously we’re not speculating that these specific commenters had anything to do the punishment of David Coppedge at JPL. But the prevalence of the kind of intolerance they express certainly makes it easy to understand why Coppedge’s case has merit.

A powerful argument indeed! It would have been fun if they had tried to use it in court. But they don’t need to do that. In the Discoveroids’ alternate universe, this kind of post-trial argument about irrelevancies is just as good as winning the trial. Indeed, it’s better, because it “proves” how biased the system is. Let’s read on:

Even though the final ruling has not been issued, these Darwin-activists are already drawing their own conclusions about what the evidence has shown, claiming Coppedge “badger[ed] coworkers” or “aggressively promote[d]” ID. But what evidence was admitted in the case that shows any such thing? Coppedge’s critics don’t reference any.

That’s right! Blog commenters don’t provide citations to the trial transcript. Nevertheless, the judge heard the witnesses, and he reached his conclusions from their testimony. Post-trial blog comments are irrelevant — except in the Discoveroids’ alternate universe.

Then they spend several paragraphs presenting the Discoveroids’ version of the courtroom evidence — also without references to the transcript. It appears to us that the Discoveroid version of things is no more authoritative than that of the blog commenters. We’ll skip a lot of blather and jump to near the end, where it says:

[W]hen commenters say Coppedge was “whining for a special privilege,” that’s not true. Coppedge wasn’t asking for any privilege. He was simply asking for the same privileges he saw granted to ID-critics and others at JPL. And he never complained when Darwinian evolutionists promoted their views and/or attacked ID while at work. He never objected to their exercising their freedom of speech.

Wow — how horrible it must have been. Imagine the sense of injustice felt by a flat-earther who works at an airline who is told to shut up, while spherical-earthers are allowed to freely express their views. No wonder Coppedge felt he was the victim of injustice. Here’s the end of it:

But when Coppedge advocated ID, he was shut down. That’s the logical, legal, and moral inconsistency at the heart of this case, and JPL never cited objective evidence that could satisfactorily explain it.

So there you are. The Discoveroids have their narrative. The whole world is prejudiced against Coppedge and his wonderful science, and that’s why the case is being decided against him.

Copyright © 2012. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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37 responses to “Discoveroids Develop Their Coppedge Narrative

  1. doodlebugger

    cop out n. 1. refers to taking the easy way out of a sticky situation. Placing blame on something else to make things easier for yourself is a a “cop out”.
    2.An excuse for evasion
    Synonyms: avoidance, dodging, ducking, eluding, elusion, eschewal, eschewing, evasion, out, shaking, shunning

  2. I was expecting them to play the Conspiracy card, or maybe the Persecution Angle, but grasping at straws almost seems desperate and pathetic by comparison. Come on Dishonesty Institute we know you can do better!

  3. I’d live to take a selection of there comments and see how they compare.

    Oh wait I CAN’T. Because they don’t allow comments.

  4. Well, first off I really hate people who point out one typed “their” instead of “they’re” because that’s just so picky and if “one” was astute enough to figure out the meaning why embarrass the author who probably has many, many more important things to be embarrassed about.

    Second, I’m disappointed that the SC blog commenters were overlooked by the DI because we’re about as mean, biased, hateful, intolerant and just plain ornery as any P-thumber.

    And, finally, over at the sewer blog that is Uncommon whatever, even the denizens of the echo chamber have been hard pressed to defend Coppedge with a small number of mild observations trailing off to nothing. Sort of hard to defend a case where Coppy’s own notes and testimony document that he was a jerk who let his skills slide.

    One of the more rabid inmates at UD wrote:

    But yes, if his skill set did not meet the requirements then he does not have a case and he should have never even started this.

    Actually, I didn’t think UD was capable of sanity but that comment was right on target, but the underlying point is missed that it was the DI that pushed Coppy into this mess in the first place (not so wild guess).

  5. Doc Bill said:

    we’re about as mean, biased, hateful, intolerant and just plain ornery as any P-thumber.

    True, especially you after you’ve drank some of that Curmudgeonite whiskey I know you keep stashed around. But they also know we’re intelligent. Which means if they pick a fight with us, they will lose. Big time.
    The stupid in this latest article is beyond redemption. As Spector567 stated, we can’t use their own commenters as examples since they don’t allow any comments. But if they assume that comments for or against any particular argument, regardless of where they come from, are valid, friends, game on.
    It’s funny that they bring up Panda’s Thumb. Because there are several commenters on PT who are obviously DI acolytes. As one commenter going by the pseudonym of “FL” has stated:

    (1) The Kitzmiller decision has turned out to be genuinely flawed (as even some opponents of ID have argued). (2) Kitzmiller has genuinely failed to stop the growing public interest in the topic of intelligent design, despite the best efforts of evolutionists and their media shills during the last three years.

    Now, this same “FL” has also explicitly stated that he’s a creationist and literally believes in “young earth creationism”. I have more where that came from, if they want to continue this dance.

  6. Sorry, SC. I think my previous comment is sitting in moderation due to the number of links.

  7. This ruling is a travesty, the freedom of religious expression is a constitutional right!

  8. docbill1351 says:

    Well, first off I really hate people who point out one typed “their” instead of “they’re” because that’s just so picky

    [Mumble, grumble] Okay, it’s fixed.

  9. I smell another Luskin book coming from the depths of hell, “Traipsing into Stupidity, the ID Martyr Story.”

    I can’t help but think of them at this moment as portraying the film “The Life of Brian” at the very end, singing from their martyr crosses, “Always look on the Bright Side of Things.”

  10. “The stupid in this latest article is beyond redemption. As Spector567 stated, we can’t use their own commenters as examples since they don’t allow any comments.”

    Just remembered we don’t actually have to use there comments. We have there own blog written by there senior fellows.

    Also to those who haven’t tried. Even the politest comments posted on coppers blog get deleted if you contradict there world view.

  11. Ceteris Paribus

    Given the bother that the DI has now gone to by developing a journal (BIO-Complexity), science lab (Biologic Institute), and “peer reviewed” vanity press operation (Discovery Institute Press), the DI seems to have abandoned the folksy, rustic, even naive realm of a cargo cult, and are now practicing the intentionally deceptive black art of the Potemkin village.

  12. Maybe I’ll start the Curmudgeon Press (peer-reviewed, of course), and then I can run around like Casey saying: “As I said in my book …”

  13. Ceteris Paribus

    @TC: Vanity presses are fine, and very much in the main stream of free enterprise. But probably you should set a humanitarian limit, and promise to never ever emulate David Rives Ministry videos.

  14. retiredsciguy

    keithnoback “This ruling is a travesty, the freedom of religious expression is a constitutional right!”

    Of course it is! But he was laid off because his position ceased to exist.

    Even if that were not the case, he was never practicing religious expression. He was promoting Intelligent Design. According to Design proponents, Intelligent Design “has nothing to do with religion.” That’s why they say it should be allowed to be taught in public schools.

    Read up on the facts before spouting off, Keith.

  15. retiredsciguy

    @Ceteris Paribus: Funny you should mention David Rives Ministries. We drove past his “world headquarters” today — such as it is, which certainly isn’t much. Little David shares space in an abandoned gas station with the Wyatt Archeological Museum just off I-65 south of Nashville.

    Not much happening there. No cars in the lot; no signs of activity, even though it was mid-afternoon.

  16. Ceteris Paribus tellingly observes that the DI

    are now practicing the intentionally deceptive black art of the Potemkin village

    This is an excellent point, and I agree to a large measure.

    Still, I don’t think one can be too categorical here, on the grounds that the distinction between a Potemkin village and a Cargo Cult turns (as CP indeed indicates) on the respective practitioners ‘ conscious intention. The architects of Potemkin villages know they are constructing a falsehood which they craft solely with the intent to deceive others, whilst Cargo Cultists are sincerely deluded adherents of their own Bizarro belief system.

    And both phenomena, it seems to me, are applicable to the Discovery Institute. On the one hand, their Wedge Strategy is an unambiguous Potemkin blueprint—and as such appealed to some (chiefly ‘neo-con’) proponents of religion as a “noble lie” (that is, something one does not believe oneself, but which is deemed to be a useful enforcer of ‘values’ for ‘social control’: think, for example, of Irving Kristol. )

    But it is hard not to suspect that folks like Luskin and Klinghoffer are honestly deluded to a large measure, and genuinely expect a fleet of goodie-laden C-130’s to land in their jungle clearing any day now. Of course, it is not given to us to know (mercifully!) what a Luskin’s innermost thoughts are, but my strong suspicion in such a case is that his manifest and enthusiastic programme of deceit stems from an initial act of profound self-delusion. Which is only to say that I think the Discoveroids really do hold the whacko beliefs they profess.

    And I think that goes some way to explaining the futility of ‘debating’ such specimens, they are incapable of grasping one clear point, to wit, that the sincerity and fervour with which a belief is held is immaterial to the ultimate truth or falsity of that belief (which is why religion is not entitled to the privileges it claims in human discourse, but that is by the by).

    The common denominator, it seems to me, among the cdesign propronentists, really is what it appears to be at face value: an a priori but groundless premise that there must be a God — to which is firmly welded the similarly-groundless corollary, and that God can only be my God.

    From that, everything else follows, e.g., nothing that is consistent with asserting this premise, including conscious Potemkin-building deception, can really be a falsehood. Or at least, that’s how it appears to work in Bizarro world.

  17. @ retiredsciguy: I thought keithnoback was being ironic in his post.

    Maybe I’m wrong? Certainly wouldn’t be the first time!

  18. Of the Discoveroids, our Curmudgeon relates

    We’ve seen their alternate legal system in their numerous articles criticizing both the factual findings and the legal conclusions in Kitzmiller

    Indeed. Just as in pre-trial there is a formal Discovery Phase, in cases such as Kitzmiller or Coppedge there is clearly a formal post-verdict Discovery Institute Phase.

    I’d go further. As DI’s judicial Monday-Morning Quarterbacking is one of their principal activities, I’d like to invite proposals for fresh terminology for the DI’s alternate legal system.

    Perhaps we can refer generically to the DI’s post-trial process here as Re-Trial in a Crocaduck Court?

    Suggestions welcome for alternate terms or para-legal paraphernalia. I would particularly relish seeing a codification of what constitutes evidence in a DI Crocaduck Court.

  19. Megalonyx says: ” I think the Discoveroids really do hold the whacko beliefs they profess.”

    I’ve gone back and forth in my mind over that. At times I read their stuff and I think they’re deluded but sincere; and at other times it seems that no one could believe such nonsense, so they must be knowingly deceitful.

    But the recent presidential election in the US has made me re-think the issue. The country is divided, with half the population thinking that Obama is great, and the other half thinking … well, otherwise. So the question is: Would anyone, just for the money, take a job creating and promoting campaign literature for the candidate he opposed? I don’t think so. In politics, except for purely technical services like polling, the policy operatives on each side are true believers, and so it must be with the Discoveroids.

  20. @ retiredsciguy
    Sorry, I just can’t keep those particular facts straight. Let me try again: ID is science not teleology, science not teleology, science not teleology…OK, now: downsizing not persecution, downsizing not persecution, persecution not downsizing, CSI is not bogus, CSI is not bogus, he’s Galileo and JPL is the Catholic church, he’s Galileo…Damn! I give up.

  21. Of blog commentary, the Discoveroid article states

    if this sort of animus is why Coppedge was demoted and forced out of JPL, then it shows Coppedge deserves to win, and should never have been terminated in the first place.

    This is a stunning piece of Crockaduckian legalese worthy of our admiration – and, methinks, it merits the following empirical test:

    Tomorrow, as I am sure you are all aware, is the single most sacred day in my spiritual calendar, Chokemas, which celebrates the miraculous re-birth from a double-boiler of my God—which is of course the One True God (accept no substitutes).

    I refer, of course, to the Almighty Astral Artichoke.

    As a devout adherent of the Church of the Sacred Artichoke Heart, I shall of course present myself at my place of employment stark naked but smeared from head to foot in vinaigrette sauce and sit quietly at my desk in deep and prayerful contemplation. To do so much as a lick of work tomorrow would do irreparable damage: my eternal soul would be condemned to the Everlasting Lake of Burning Artichoke Thorns, global warming would be accelerated, SCOTUS would legalise cannibalism, &c. &c.

    If all goes to plan, this should secure for me instant dismissal from my job and a reasonable dollop of publicity—at least enough publicity to generate some snarky (and indeed blasphemous) internet blog comments concerning my deeply-held religious beliefs. Then it should be a simple matter of hiring Counsellor Luskin to lead my lawsuit for Unlawful Dismissal on grounds of Religious Discrimination.

    I won’t settle out of (Crockaduck) Court for less than 7 figures.

  22. retiredsciguy relates an account of

    David Rives Ministries. We drove past his “world headquarters” today — such as it is, which certainly isn’t much. Little David shares space in an abandoned gas station with the Wyatt Archeological Museum

    That makes the plural part of “Ministries” even more perplexing. I assumed his vast global organisation was too big for a single ‘Ministry’ and had to be sub-divided…

  23. doodlebugger

    I think the Discoveriids are in some type of denial. Fitting into SCs category one for creationists.,mentally ill. However there are clearly elements of the other three categories ignorance.,stupidity and deceit.
    The denial.(as one who got a heavy rousing in Missouri Synod Lutheran churches as a child.) is that information that conflicts with their moral view of the world., baased on their religious training, must be incorrect.,
    therefore they must attack that information as incorrect. Its kind of like Bashar Assad in his hdqtrs listening to the gunfire closing in and living in an alternate reality of doing what worked in the past., airstrikes and artillery until it goes away. But it won.’t go away and he.’ll die there if he doesn’t.’t run.,which he wont do. Ergo : extinction preceded by destructive dysfunction.

  24. @RSG: It’s okay. Keithnoback was (and is) being sarcastic. Unless that rock jarred something loose, he’s not a creationist, just lacking in emoticons.

  25. [the DI commenting on PT and other sites] the comments themselves demonstrate the kind of intolerance that is directed against ID proponents in academic settings.

    Funny, this is the same (bad) argument used by North Korea, Iran, etc. against the US: your private citizens are saying bad things, therefore your goverment is doing something wrong. Such attacks show that the attacker really doesn’t understand the relationship between a US private citizen and the US government.

    Re: their alternate legal system – this is a good thing for us. The further their internal (legal) dialogue spins away from reality, the less capable they will be to win future court cases. Simply put, if you are interpreting evidence and precedent differently from the way court system judges do, the arguments you mount will not be very effective. The further away your are, the less effective you’ll be.

  26. eric says: “Simply put, if you are interpreting evidence and precedent differently from the way court system judges do, the arguments you mount will not be very effective.”

    Yes, but their legal claims really clog up the system. It’s like blogging about their articles, except that it’s gotta be far worse in court. When they make one of their “viewpoint discrimination” claims, the judge thinks: “Whaaaaa?” and the other side just rolls their eyes and knows they have a lot of work to do to analyze and explain in lucid terms exactly what’s being claimed and why it’s wrong.

  27. Yes, I suppose that’s true. The further they spin away from reality, the more wasted court resources we’ll have to deal with. A case that a rational lawyer would not fight, they will. I still can’t wish them better legal thinking.

  28. By the way, I wasn’t flaming the Missouri Synod above(it reads like I might be).
    I’m trying to say that as one who has been exposed to a stricter religious background when younger, I can fathom(but am still incredulous creationists do it) that some people are incapable of accepting facts when they conflict with their religious beliefs and so construct an elaborate alternate reality. Bizarro worls as SC shows in his very creative comic book picture.

  29. Ceteris Paribus

    Megalonyx says: “That makes the plural part of [David Rives] “Ministries” even more perplexing. I assumed his vast global organisation was too big for a single ‘Ministry’ and had to be sub-divided.”

    Well it is vast and global, sort of, if your destination is Mt Ararat and/or or the Holy Land. Retiredsciguy mentioned above that The Wyatt Archeological Museum shares a vacant gas station building with the “world headquafters” of David Rives [plural] Ministries.

    According to the Wyatt Archeological Museum website (I shouldl refer to it as WAM hereafter – WAM rimes with HAM) “Wyatt Archaeological Museum,
    is a division of Wyatt Archaeological Research, and is a non-denominational,
    non-profit, tax exempt, 501 C3 research organization.”

    The president of Wyatt Archeological Research (WAR?) happens to be a fellow named Richard Rives, who like David Rives is also a contributor to WND articles, although there is no mention that I could find of family relationship.

    The original Ron Wyatt was a great explorer of an ark he found up on Mt Ararat a couple decades back. And which was the subject of much publicity, to the extent that you can find xian websites claiming Ron was a con artist. (legal disclaimer – I’m not personally making any accusations or allegations)

    But we have assurance of the verity of the material at the WAM website is as good as it says it is. The web site notes: “The information included in this website is subject to the unanimous approval of the Board of Directors of Wyatt Archaeological Research”. Now don’t you just wonder who is on that board of directors?

    Note to retiredsciguy: Thanks for mentioning that the shared gas station is vacant. Some time ago I looked up the location on Google Earth, but quickly got creeped out about invading privacy or something, and thoroughly erased all the cookies in my browser and disk drive.

  30. @CP: Richard Rives is David’s father. If you google around, you can find numerous images of the two of them together, including a couple of family shots.

    On the subject of the Discoveroids’ alternate reality… it reminds me very much of the alternate reality evidenced in the election. A significant percentage of the country exists within a reality-bubble fed primarily by Fox news and AM talk radio, including apparently many of those who were on Romney’s campaign team. Living in the bubble as they were, they genuinely believed that polls which projected Obama as the winner were false and a product of mainstream media bias. This unawareness or disbelief of actual reality resulted in some lighter moments (e.g. Karl Rove’s desperate attempts to deny the Ohio call made on Fox), but more seriously it may have also cost them the election. It was a classic case of alternate reality colliding with actual reality – actual reality always wins.

    The Discoveroids live in a similar alternate reality, partially constructed by themselves but clearly within the larger evangelical right / Fox News / talk radio bubble of alternate reality. As was shown by Rove in the election, when their beliefs collide uncomfortably with the real world, Discoveroids desperately cling to their beliefs and attempt to re-write the facts to fit their reality, while the real world moves on. One example is their continuing reference to the wording of the Coppedge order as “tentative”, even though the use of that word is abundantly clear on the document (Rove-like denial). Their continuing litigation of the case on their blog is another example – they are creating an outcome that fits in their own reality, rather than acknowledging the outcome that occurred in the real world.

    When Coppedge called West and Luskin and told them he was being discriminated against for his ID views at JPL, it fit perfectly in their alternate reality of Darwinian conspiracy and “Expelled!”. I think they bought his story because they were pre-disposed to believe it. They assumed they would win, and strike a blow against Darwinists at the same time. Sometime, however, reality bites.

  31. So, they’re basically ignoring all the other reasons he was canned?

    Typical..

  32. Wise Ed wrote:

    When Coppedge called West and Luskin and told them he was being discriminated against for his ID views at JPL, it fit perfectly in their alternate reality of Darwinian conspiracy and “Expelled!”. I think they bought his story because they were pre-disposed to believe it. They assumed they would win, and strike a blow against Darwinists at the same time. Sometime, however, reality bites.

    I think it was the other way around. Quite possibly Coppedge through his position on the board of Ilustra Media moaned about his work problems, but I think it was the DI who goaded him into the original suit.

    Ask yourself, when do you feel like suing your neighbor, just after his dog bites you or a year after his dog bites you? Coppedge’s original suit had no merit at all. He lost no money, no grade, no salary and no job. The only thing he had to complain about is that JPL told him to shut up and stop bugging people.

    It fits into the DI narrative to blow this out of proportion and make it a sort of First Amendment, freedom of whatever, persecution, viewpoint discrimination, ID ain’t no religion except when we say it is sort of case. That has failed miserably.

    If you remember the California Science Institute fiasco where they settled, no fault, out of court, the DI’s smoking gun documented that they were out to deliberately cause trouble. Which they did.

    Same MO here, I think. Consider West who is sneaky and motivated and Coppers who’s as dumb as a bag of hammers. Hey, don’t y’all tell me I’m right, because I already know that!

  33. docbill1351 says: “I think it was the DI who goaded him into the original suit.”

    The Discoveroids may have encouraged him, but I’m starting to suspect that he had motives beyond being a pawn in yet another viewpoint discrimination case. It’s possible that he feared the coming downsizing, which I believe was commonly known at JPL to be coming. He may have figured that if he sued them over the demotion, then they wouldn’t dare let him go in the downsizing, because they’d be afraid that he would then claim that the dismissal was an act of retaliation for the suit. Indeed, that’s exactly what he argued in his wrongful dismissal action.

    So his motive for the original suit may have been an attempt to gain some kind of immunity in the later downsizing. If that was the plan, it didn’t work too well, because JPL had evidence that the demotion was well-deserved, and he was later let go in the downsizing because of his skills, something unrelated to his earlier suit.

  34. Doc Bill said:

    Coppers who’s as dumb as a bag of hammers.

    How DARE you insult that bag of hammers! What did that bag of hammers ever do to you?!?!?

  35. If Coppers thought he could stave off getting let go by filing a harassment lawsuit then he got terrible legal advice. Even Becker wouldn’t be that stupid. Also, JPL knew about the litigation and they, being a lot smarter and more professional, would not have opened themselves up to a wrongful termination suit. As we have seen, JPL had it’s ducks in a row and Coppy made no sense.

    We will never know unless old Coppers gets fed up with the DI and decides to write a Tell All book. I doubt that will happen.

  36. Curmudgeon: “Blog comments? They’re worried about blog comments? That stuff isn’t nearly as pernicious as the articles published by Discoveroid ‘fellows’..:”

    But as the DI whined, those blog comments are by “Darwin activists,” so that changes everything.

    Sure, many of the comments are embarrassing and counterproductive, especially if they take Discoveroid bait and whine about “lying for Jesus, and drown out the excellent comments that call a scam a scam. But remember what a “Darwin activist” is. It’s someone who roots for those 1000s of scientists who are constantly trying to ”dethrone” Darwin, and find that elusive better explanation. But the “convergence, neither sought nor fabricated” of evidence just won’t let them. For ~0.1% of those scientists, their passion to “dethrone” Darwin overrules that voice that warns them not to bear false witness. So they sign bogus “dissent” statements, and/or join radical organizations that peddle pseudoscience and propaganda.

  37. I don’t buy the “immunity” hypothesis to explain the Coppedge lawsuit. The initial meeting, between Coppedge and his supervisor regarding the ID-related behavior, took place on 2 March 2009, with the HR meeting taking the following day. For the next month or two, Coppedge then attempted to go through the JPL channels for relief, obviously to no avail.

    Coppedge then filed a FEHA complaint on 12 June 2009, roughly 3 months after the initial meeting with his supervisor. Coppedge was granted an immediate right to sue on that same date. Coppedge filed further complaint on 17 September 2009, again granted right to sue, and then amended the complaint on 22 September 2009.

    IOW there was considerable history before the 14 April 2010 lawsuit filing, with at least two considerations to sue, months before then. I remind the readers that Coppedge was laid off 24 January 2011, nearly two years after that initial supervisor’s meeting.

    This doesn’t fit the “immunity hypothesis.” Possibly Coppedge was advised at that initial meeting that there would be a downsizing and that his head was near the block. But that possibility was apparently never mentioned by either party in the lawsuit.