Answers in Genesis Gives Scotland a Chance

This appeared in the East Kilbride News of East Kilbride, in the west-central Lowlands of Scotland: Creation or evolution a chance to hear the arguments.

Wow — a chance to hear the arguments! Isn’t that wonderful? After all the censorship and academic bullying by Darwinists, at last the people have a chance to hear the other side. It brings tears to your Curmudgeon’s eyes. [*Start music*] All they are saaaaaaying, is give creationism a chance.

At this point you may want to take a nostalgic hippie break and listen to John Lennon’s Give Peace A Chance. Okay, y’all ready to resume? Let’s see what the news story says, with bold font added by us:

Lanarkshire people have the chance this weekend to get in on the heated debate about ‘Creation versus Evolution’. A group of Christians led by Hairmyres surgeon and Christian youth leader Doctor Nagy Iskander have arranged a visit by controversial American academic Dr Terry Mortenson, a lecturer and researcher at Answers in Creation in the US, to Scotland this weekend.

Ooooooooooh! Aren’t you excited? At last, the godly wisdom of Answers in Genesis (AIG), the online creationist ministry of Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo) is coming to Scotland. Here’s more:

Dr Mortenson will be speaking at the Answers in Genesis Scottish Conference being held in Hamilton College assembly hall off the Bothwell Road in Hamilton on Saturday and Sunday. [Omitting details of the schedule.]

But who is that guy the news story mentioned, youth leader Doctor Nagy Iskander? Let’s read on:

Dr Iskander, who was born in Egypt, has visited the Creation Museum in Northern Kentucky a number of times and was involved in setting up an Arabic website to make information on the museum available to people living in the Middle East.

What a great man! But there’s more:

Urging local people to attend the lectures, Dr Iskander, who runs the Jesus and Me Club for children in East Kilbride and the Discovery Bible Group said: “The question of origins has occupied the human mind for many centuries: did God really create the World and all thatis in it? Or did life begin by the random collision of enough of the atoms which form complex molecules to produce biological cells capable of replicating themselves?”

Okay, that’s enough. But we have even more news from Scotland. In The Herald of Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland, we read CALL TO BAN CREATIONISM. Egad! What a grim counterpoint to the hopeful story that began this post. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

Paul Braterman, an emeritus professor of chemistry at Glasgow University and a founder of the British Centre for Science Education, a campaign to keep religion out of science classes, said he wanted Scotland to follow the lead of England and introduce guidance that creationism should not be presented as scientific theory.

As the story continues, it connects the dots by mentioning the upcoming AIG conference:

Dr Nagy Iskander … a surgeon and director of the JAM (Jesus and Me) Trust in East Kilbride, has been described as one of “Europe’s most active creationists” by Ken Ham, the founder of Answers in Genesis, a US-based religious ministry which seeks to promote a creationist account of the history of the world. Iskander has helped organise a conference in Scotland this weekend involving speakers from Answers in Genesis and recently took part in a debate on religion at a local school.

The creationists want only to give the Scots a chance, and look what the Darwinists are doing! Here’s the rest of it:

He [Iskander] said: “Creation according to the Christian faith is a supernatural act of God, so it will not be repeated and we can’t test creation in the lab. Evolution needs to take place over millions of years and we cannot test that either. My view on this is we should mention everything – we should examine all the evidence and all the facts and have an open and civilised discussion about all of this without excluding one or the other.

All the creationists want is a to “have an open and civilised discussion.” But the Darwinists want to ban them from the schools! Why, oh, why won’t they give creationism a chance? (Listen again to the John Lennon song.) Okay, that’s it. We’re done here.

Copyright © 2013. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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19 responses to “Answers in Genesis Gives Scotland a Chance

  1. The JAM (Jesus and Me) club sounds like and could easily pass for Luskin’s IDEA club.

  2. Ceteris Paribus

    Lanarkshire is probably a whole lot easier to pronounce than Worcestershire, so that’s a plus. Still, picking a venue in Scotland could result in a lot of lost time while the speakers argue about which side unfairly employed the “No true Scotsman” fallacy.

  3. The country that gae us Adam Smith, James Watt, David Hume and Rabbie Burns can easily withstand any onslaught from the likes of JAM, laddie!

  4. And speaking of onslaughts against a Scotsman, Andrew McNeil managed to withstand the redoubtable Alex Jones; see ‘Shock jock’ disrupts BBC’s Sunday Politics show, but only if you wonder why the phrase “Ugly American” still persists….

  5. Megalonyx says: “The country that gae us Adam Smith, James Watt, David Hume and Rabbie Burns can easily withstand any onslaught from the likes of JAM, laddie!”

    Aye, but all the good whiskey comes from the highlands. I dinna ken those lowland folk.

  6. Quibble, to avoid claiming more than I’m entitled to; I do have an honorary position at Glasgow, but my Emeritus Professorship is form North Texas. And in Texas I had the chance to see close up the destructive effect of creationism on learning.

  7. And while we’re on the subject of Nagy Iskander, a Glasgow area surgeon (wha tis it about surgeons, of all people?), he’s on the Chaplaincy Panel (!) of a local non-denominational publicly funded school: http://www.calderglen.s-lanark.sch.uk/Calderglenchaplaincy/Chaplaincy_homepage_1.htm

  8. docbill1351

    Scotland, my Scotland! I’ve got (nae, used to!) a single red mustache hair I attribute to a Scot in the woodpile somewhere. That and my penchant for cross-dressing. Aye, it’s the Bruce, doncha see.

    I participated in field work in Scotland way up at Cape Wrath with my wife-to-be, Doc H, and we were way up the tor collecting rock samples from the naked stone (she be the geologist and I be the pack mule.) and as the sun was starting to fade and our bones (my bones) were a-creaking we looked down the tor, across the heather and way out in the distance was this tiny green pixel of our car. Two hours of slogging down rock and across heather, me with a ton of tor, we made it to the car and hence to the warm light of yon tavern. Never a more welcoming sight than that big fireplace a-blazing and a generous dram or five of a single malt and a little plate of oat cakes. Once revived we dined on venison, what pass for vegetables in the North, a delightful berry crumble and the remains of a bottle or two of the single. Alas, our lodgings were not in the warm tavern, but miles away in a cold, cold camp. Apparently we made it back to the camp where our exhaustion balanced our dedication to finish the third or fifth fifth of single and the rest is a blur. I do recall waking up covered in frost and trying to light a camp stove using numb sausages for fingers. Then back up the tor for Geology Research Round Two.

    Fond memories of Scotland where men are men and sheep are worried.

  9. Paul Braterman visits our humble blog and says: “And in Texas I had the chance to see close up the destructive effect of creationism on learning.”

    Then you’re the best man to explain the situation. It must be fun.

  10. There is a sudden ferment of self-examination about the entire relationship between religion and the State education system in Scotland, where the legal framework is very different from that in the US; see e.g. http://wp.me/p21T1L-4I and http://wp.me/p21T1L-4N

  11. Paul Braterman says: “There is a sudden ferment of self-examination about the entire relationship between religion and the State education system in Scotland, where the legal framework is very different from that in the US”

    Interesting articles. Thanks for the links.

  12. Ceteris Paribus

    DocBill says: “(she be the geologist and I be the pack mule.)”

    Well then it must be that the Intelligent Designer never set foot in Scotland. Otherwise you should have been furnished with one or more local grad students to do the heavy lifting.

  13. From the news article: “…a visit by controversial American academic Dr Terry Mortenson, a lecturer and researcher at Answers in Creation in the US…”

    Answers in Creation? Now that’s an interesting slip.

  14. Our docbill1351 notes a Scottish menu including

    what pass for vegetables in the North

    Most likely, this was a 100% meat-free Deep-fried Mars Bar

  15. “Fond memories of Scotland where men are men and sheep are worried.”

    I think you’ll find that’s Wales.

  16. docbill1351

    Mmmmmmmmm, deep fried Mars bar.

    Ironically, my first job was with Mars in Slough where I wrote quality control software to measure the thickness of the chocolate coating of Mars bars. Sweet job!

  17. Interestingly, Answers in Creation is now Old Earth Ministries.

  18. Ceteris Paribus

    If the Scots evolved Deep-fried Mars Bars, then why is there still Haggis?Haggis?

  19. Ceteris Paribus asks: “If the Scots evolved Deep-fried Mars Bars, then why is there still Haggis?”

    No true Scotsman eats anything but haggis.