Springboro School Board Abandons Some Lunacy

The last time we wrote about the campaign of educational madness that was being spearheaded by School Board President Kelly Kohls, a creationist nutritionist, who also heads the local tea party organization, was Springboro School Board: Once More into the Ark.

Now, at the website of WCHS, Channel 8 in Charleston, West Virginia (that state borders Ohio, and Springboro is a suburb of Dayton, Ohio), we read Ohio school district won’t host course that critics say is skewed to religion.

Unfortunately, it’s an AP story, and we can’t post any excerpts. Instead, we’ll just give you a summary of what they say. This isn’t about the Board’s continuing obsession with ramming creationism into the school system’s science classes. Instead, it’s about their plan to host courses for staff and parents on the Constitution. The proposed courses were going to be presented by the Institute on the Constitution, whose website says: “Americans are blessed that our Founders’ Biblical Worldview informed their political philosophy and the framing of our founding documents.”

Another course presenter was going to be the National Center for Constitutional Studies (NCCS). They sell books by David Barton, and it’s been reported that Barton (either in person or through his materials) would be involved in the Springboro courses. The Wikipedia article about the NCCS says:

The National Center for Constitutional Studies (NCCS) is a conservative, religious-themed constitutionalist organization, founded by Latter-Day Saint political writer Cleon Skousen. It was formerly known as The Freemen Institute. According to the NCCS, the founding of the United States was a divine miracle. As such, the NCCS worldview and program are based on three major pillars: (1) understanding the divine guidance that has allowed the United States to thrive and (2) rejecting the tyrannical and sinful nature of the modern U.S. federal government.

Wikipedia doesn’t mention the third pillar. Anyway, that was what the Springboro School Board had in mind, but now they’ve dropped those plans. The AP story doesn’t say much else, except that the Board’s proposals were met with “protests from some parents and civil rights groups.”

But it’s not over in Springboro. School Board President Kelly Kohls, the creationist nutritionist, still has plans to teach creationism. So stay tuned to this blog.

Copyright © 2013. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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6 responses to “Springboro School Board Abandons Some Lunacy

  1. Our Curmudgeon notes:

    …in Springboro. School Board President Kelly Kohls, the creationist nutritionist, still has plans to teach creationism.

    I do so fervently hope so! But she is such a schtick tease…!

  2. I’m so glad we have a court system and a bill of rights.

  3. Ceteris Paribus

    SC says: “Wikipedia doesn’t mention the third pillar.” [of The National Center for Constitutional Studies (NCCS) theology]

    Poking around in my clandestine archive of discarded Wikipedia edits, it appears that the NCCS had planned to steal the Hajj, Pillar 5 of the 5 Pillars of Islam:
    “3. Hallelujah! (the pilgrimage to the Creation Museum at least once in a lifetime.)”

  4. Ceteris Paribus

    arrrgghh I promise never to try using italics again after 9pm

  5. “Creationist nutritionist”? Few lines of work face more temptation to sell out to pseudoscience than “nutritionist.” You can fool almost anyone with “natural,” “organic” and “no ‘chemicals'” nonsense. “We don’t need no stinkin’ testing, we know what works.” Couple that with a radical, paranoid authoritarian ideology that is the one feature common to ~99.99% of “creationists” of all “kinds” (flat-earthers to non-Biblical literalists who accept common descent), and it’s a marriage made in pseudoscience heaven.

  6. “Americans are blessed that our Founders’ Biblical Worldview informed their political philosophy and the framing of our founding documents.”

    One of the most misleading half-truths ever. The Founders were friends of the Enlightenment, and to the most radical anti-authoritarian political experiment known at the time. They valued real science, not pseudoscience. Most believed in a Creator and moral absolutes, but so do most of today’s “Darwinists,” In fact, the typical Founder was a “hands-off” Deist, while some of the most vocal critics of ID/creationism candidly admit their personal belief of a “hands-on” Creator. They just don’t pretend that it’s science. And they don’t deliberately confuse “is” with “ought,” or play the “Hitler” card (“Expelled”) when the rest of their scam fails.