Creationist Wisdom #359: Prison Preacher

Today’s letter-to-the-editor appears in the Beaumont Enterprise of Beaumont, Texas. It’s titled Creationism supported. We’ll give you a few excerpts, enhanced with our Curmudgeonly commentary and some bold font for emphasis. As we usually do we’ll omit the writer’s name and city. Okay, here we go:

The editorial “Science in science classes” on Sept. 11 implies that the theory of evolution is scientific, while a belief in a creative intelligence is not.

Yes, that’s the implication. He’s talking about this: Science classes must teach science. The letter-writer tells us why he finds that objectionable:

To me, that is about as rational as saying science supports the theory that The Enterprise building built itself, with no plan or purpose. Conversely, the same reasoning says it is obviously unscientific to believe that somebody designed it.

Who is this letter-writer? We think he’s described here: 2010 Governor’s Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award. Same name, same town. If that’s our man, he was an Air Force pilot, now he’s a prison preacher. Let’s read on:

If you require teachers to present evolution as science, you will be forcing some of them to teach what they believe to be false.

Those people should not be teaching science. They ought to consider changing careers and going into preaching. The letter continues:

If the origins of the universe are to be taught at all, integrity demands that creationism be presented as a viable alternative to evolution.

Aaaargh!! We have found yet another creationist who thinks evolution is about the origin of the universe. Fortunately, his letter is brief. This is the last of it:

I am a retired professional engineer. I have tried both sides, and I choose this day to believe I was created on purpose, by a master planner who knows what I am for.

Do not despair, dear reader. We can learn from this. What do we learn? That the existence of creationists is one of the best arguments against the claim that we were intelligently designed. Anyway, nice letter.

Copyright © 2013. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

4 responses to “Creationist Wisdom #359: Prison Preacher

  1. Perhaps the most unnerving thing about this and other recent letters denigrating evolution is the increasing adoption of Discoverrhoid rhetoric, to wit reference to some unspecified “master planner” allegedly “[creating humans] on purpose.” It means the Discoverrhoid deception is penetrating into the common consciousness, including preachers who, one would’ve thought, are less susceptible to vacuous sound bite rhetoric, typically being masters of it themselves.

  2. “I am a retired professional engineer. I have tried both sides, and I choose this day to believe I was created on purpose, by a master planner who knows what I am for.”

    Apparently you were created by the master planner to post inane editorials.

  3. Ceteris Paribus

    The 2010 Governor’s Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award/ Air Force pilot/ prison preacher says:
    “I am a retired professional engineer. ”

    Well, retired or not, one of the basic tenets of professional registration is to never practice outside the limits of one’s discipline or competence.

    I respectfully suggest that biology and cosmology are some distance separated from what his biography can support.

  4. If the origins of the universe are to be taught at all, integrity demands that creationism be presented…”

    You “Darwinists” have no imagination. Ya gotta have fun with these people. Ask if they agree or disagree with those activists who say that “creationism” (and ID) should not be taught, only the (bogus) “strengths and weaknesses” of evolution. If they disagree there’s hope. If they take whatever they can get away with, that’s evidence that they’ll buy into the scam.

    SC: “They ought to consider changing careers and going into preaching.”

    No!!! It’s one thing to teach scripture literally, knowing that ~half the students will still infer it allegorically. But if one deliberately repeats misinformation about evolution and the nature of science, one is bearing false witness. It may be legal to do that in church or religious class, but it is not moral. Don’t take my word for it. Ask 12,800+ members of clergy.