Massive Creationist Ecstasy Alert!

This post will be brief, but it’s our duty to bring these things to your attention. PhysOrg reports: Water-rich gem points to vast ‘oceans’ beneath the Earth.

All over the flat Earth, creationists are waking up to the news that the fabled “fountains of the deep” that fueled Noah’s Flood, long predicted by Flood geology, have been discovered, proving at last to a skeptical world that Genesis is based on solid science.

Here’s what PhysOrg says, with bold font added by us:

A University of Alberta diamond scientist has found the first terrestrial sample of a water-rich gem that yields new evidence about the existence of large volumes of water deep beneath the Earth.

The Flood! The Flood! Aaaargh!! Okay, we’ll calm down and try to control ourselves. Here’s a bit more:

An international team of scientists led by Graham Pearson, Canada Excellence Research Chair in Arctic Resources at the U of A, has discovered the first-ever sample of a mineral called ringwoodite. Analysis of the mineral shows it contains a significant amount of water — 1.5 per cent of its weight — a finding that confirms scientific theories about vast volumes of water trapped 410 to 660 kilometres beneath the Earth, between the upper and lower mantle.

Aaaargh!! Aaaargh!! Ooops, sorry. We really are trying to behave in our customary dignified manner. Let’s read on:

“This sample really provides extremely strong confirmation that there are local wet spots deep in the Earth in this area,” said Pearson, a professor in the Faculty of Science, whose findings were published March 13 in Nature. “That particular zone in the Earth, the transition zone, might have as much water as all the world’s oceans put together.”

[** Powerful discipline being exerted by your Curmudgeon **] Here’s a link to the paper in Nature, but the only thing you can read without a subscription is the abstract: Hydrous mantle transition zone indicated by ringwoodite included within diamond. Back to PhysOrg:

Pearson’s sample was found in 2008 in the Juina area of Mato Grosso, Brazil, where artisan miners unearthed the host diamond from shallow river gravels. The diamond had been brought to the Earth’s surface by a volcanic rock known as kimberlite — the most deeply derived of all volcanic rocks.

The article has some illustrations about what’s supposed to be under the Earth’s surface. One of them looks like something Jules Verne might have drawn, and it’s certain to be reproduced at all the familiar creationist websites. Don’t miss the opportunity to click over there to see it. Here’s one more excerpt:

Scientists have been deeply divided about the composition of the transition zone and whether it is full of water or desert-dry. Knowing water exists beneath the crust has implications for the study of volcanism and plate tectonics, affecting how rock melts, cools and shifts below the crust.

Now we’ll sit back and wait for the inevitable creationist festival of Drool.

Creationist reaction: AIG: The Fountains of the Deep.

Another creationist reaction: ICR: The Fountains of the Deep.

Copyright © 2014. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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29 responses to “Massive Creationist Ecstasy Alert!

  1. I am almost sure they are going to tell us, you see there was always enough water to fill the earth!

  2. PhysOrg reports

    vast volumes of water trapped 410 to 660 kilometres beneath the Earth, between the upper and lower mantle.

    Actually, this is wonderful news! Can anyone think of a better venue than this for Ken Ham’s Ark Encounter?

  3. Christine Janis

    As soon as I saw your heading, I knew that this would be about the water business. Saw it in the paper this morning and clapped my hand to my head

  4. Uh huh. What’s the temperature of that water? If it came up to contribute to Noah’s Flood, Noah and all the dinosaurs on the Ark would’ve been steamed to death.

  5. P.S. Call me when they find the pillars upon which the Earth rests, the four corners of the Earth, the waters above the sky, and the windows of the heavens that open up to let in the rain.

  6. Steamed dinosaurs were delicious, that’s the real reason they’re extinct.

  7. Doesn’t it seem a bit odd that this is the very first “discovery” of such a hydrated gem, considering that there’s “all this water down there” where diamonds come from?

    It’s a mighty big conclusion to jump to based on one teensy bit of evidence.

    Perhaps there’s another explanation of how water may have gotten into this diamond — “… artisan miners unearthed the host diamond from shallow river gravels“.

    It’s no mystery that there is water in the mantle. It gets there as saturated ocean sediments are subducted by plate tectonics along plate convergence zones. It’s the source of the steam that powers the world’s explosive volcanos, such as Krakatoa, Tambora, Pinatubo, St. Helens, etc. Impressive effects, but hardly enough water to cause a global flood.

  8. Aarrgh! [Edited out]

  9. Diogenes sneers: “Call me when they find the pillars upon which the Earth rests, the four corners of the Earth, the waters above the sky …”

    You Darwinist fool! The waters have already been found — see ICR: Water Canopy, Pioneer Anomaly, & Uranus. As for the other details, creation scientists are working on it.

  10. More at SciAm. The water is not free water as a liquid; it is present as hydroxide ions so the cretinists will have their work cut out when trying to link this to an ostensible global flood afew thousand years ago. On the other hand, they themselves do produce a global flood — of nonsense.

  11. Ha, a true imbroglio at a Dutch University!

    http://www.trouw.nl/tr/nl/5091/Religie/article/detail/3610531/2014/03/10/Universiteit-doet-onderzoek-naar-creationisme-bijbaan-van-hoogleraar.dhtml

    The secular University of Wageningen (mainly agricultural; I had an uncle working there – he is retired) employs (but doesn’t pay) a professor teaching Christian Philosophy. Don’t ask me why they would need that, I have no idea. The thing is that the man, Henk Jochemsen

    http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henk_Jochemsen

    (yup, he is an engineer) has a sidejob at foundation De Oude Wereld (The Old World).

    http://www.oude-wereld.nl/

    Yup – thoroughly creationist. They seem to be of the “Teach the Controversy” line and totally want to replace textbooks for Dutch schools. They equally totally failed in this respect – the Dutch Ministry of Education doesn’t even answer their letters anymore.
    So the big questions are: is creacrapper Henk Jochemsen giving the University of Wageningen a bad name? Is there a conflict of interest?

    The latest news is that the University of Wageningen doesn’t have any problems with the private hobbies of Henk Jochemsen. How will the other professors react, especially those who teach Evolution Theory?
    OK, not as exciting as the Ball State Imbroglio, but it still shows that creanuts are not only to be found in the USA.
    Should I be proud or be ashamed as a Dutchman? A little of both perhaps.

  12. “the cretinists will have their work cut out when trying to link this to an ostensible global flood afew thousand years ago”
    Yup. If it is deep in the ground after the Great Flood it probably also was deep in the ground before this event. So how did it get high up in the sky? My proposal is a divine pump. Here we have clue where to look:

    http://www.divinepumps.com/

    Yes, that’s genuine crearesearch for you.

  13. mnb0 asks: “Should I be proud or be ashamed as a Dutchman?”

    A little of each, I think. It’s good to be humble.

  14. On balance, mnbo, I’d say the Netherlands have given the world more good (like, Weertervlaai, serving mayonnaise rather than ketchup with French fries, and of course, van Gogh) rather than bad.

    But some of the bad is genuinely awful, such as Abraham Kuijper

  15. oops! A comma is missing in above post, between ‘Weertervlaai‘ and ‘serving’.

    Weertervlaai with either mayonnaise or ketchup would be an unspeakable abomination.

  16. Megalonyx says: “an unspeakable abomination.”

    I often hear that phrase when your name comes up in the presence of a certain splendidly evolved young lady, but it wouldn’t be appropriate for me to provide details.

  17. “Steamed dinosaurs.”

    But how do we know they had short tempers?

  18. retiredsciguy ponders—

    “But how do we know [dinosaurs] had short tempers?”

    Because a bout of road rage made them stomp some hominid pedestrians into the Paluxy riverbed?

  19. serving mayonnaise rather than ketchup with French fries

    Barbarians!

  20. I have access to the Nature article. Shoot me an email of you want to see it.

    Or, if the Lords of HTML allow, click this.

  21. Because a bout of road rage made them stomp some hominid pedestrians into the Paluxy riverbed?

    That’s an “After Eden” cartoon I’d like to see at Answers in Genesis.

  22. Stephen Colbert refers to the Netherlands as “HItler’s Left-Turn Lane”

  23. Ceteris Paribus

    Professor Pearson reports “That particular zone in the Earth, the transition zone, might have as much water as all the world’s oceans put together.”

    No one, not even a “science” professor, can put all the world’s oceans together. Just look at the map. The Creator put a whole bunch of continents in the way. Silly professor.

  24. I recall when I was courting my wife she once made a comment about it being “hot down there.” As a geologist she was referring to chelated water in minerals under pressure, I assumed, and as an analytical chemist, myself, I set upon exploring the hypothesis quantitatively.

    It was the least I could do, under the conditions.

  25. Stephen Kennedy

    Even if there is as much water under the surface of the Earth as there is in all of the oceans, it would still not be enough to float Hambo’s ark of Appalachia. If you know some integral calculus and do the math you will find that it takes about five times as much water as there is in all the oceans to inundate the Earth to the point of submerging the highest mountains in the Himalayas.

  26. Doc Bill says: “I set upon exploring the hypothesis quantitatively.”

    And she still married you?

  27. I think it would be tempting for assorted YEC ‘flood geologists’ to crow that ‘science is catching up with scripture’ over this. Yet my understanding – based on their reading of part of Psalm 104:8 in the New American Standard Bible (the valleys sank down) – is that they say that after the Genesis flood the waters went into the, newly much deepened, oceans. See for instance: http://creation.com/where-did-all-the-water-go
    Thus – could they reasonably claim that these inferred waters also result from the (not to be repeated) flood of Noah? Newly sunk or deepened valleys could hold more water (below sea level) than previously. But perhaps they will now inform us that this verse also means that deeper valleys on land could hold more subterranean water than previously assumed by scientists? Well, under Brazil at least.

  28. @TA: Thanks for the link. It worked perfectly.