Terry Kemple — He’s Back!

The Florida Ark

The Florida Ark

We once again visit Florida’s Hillsborough County, which, you may recall, was the power base of Rapturous Ronda Storms. That deeply religious county is in the heart of the Florida Ark. The what? According to the Curmudgeon’s Glossary:

The Florida Ark is that concave stretch of coast — an arc, get it? — starting at the Alabama border and then sweeping down the shore of the Gulf of Mexico all the way to Tampa, and a bit beyond. This blessed region is home to a great number of creationists.

Terry Kemple, who previously ran unsuccessfully for a seat on the Hillsborough County School Board, is running again. Our last post about him was more than three years ago — Terry Kemple, Tampa Creationist & Cultural Hero.

Today, in the Tampa Bay Times published in St. Petersburg, Florida (in a neighboring county), we read East Hillsborough School Board race has conservative focus. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

There is a truism about eastern Hillsborough County: When it comes to politics, you can’t tack too far to the right. That adage is being tested this fall as Terry Kemple, possibly Hillsborough’s best-known Christian conservative activist, makes his third run for the School Board.

He ran districtwide the first two times and lost … . This time he is running in the land of the Bell Shoals Baptist superchurch and former state Sen. Ronda Storms, a district where the pro-family, anti-Obamacare Stacy White defeated two better-funded candidates in the August primary for a likely spot on the County Commission.

It seems like he’s the right man running in the right place. Here’s more:

But Kemple, 68, takes it up a notch. He’s spoken out against gay rights and Muslim advocacy. He called it a travesty that the schools teach evolution as fact.

A travesty! What a great guy. His victory would definitely be a blogger’s bonanza. But wait, there’s more:

And he isn’t just against the Common Core standards; he accused the state of trying to defraud the public on the issue. So is Kemple too far to the right, even for east Hillsborough?

We posted enough about Ronda Storms to doubt that anybody can be too far to the right in her back yard. Let’s read on:

Already, he has been shown up by businesswoman Melissa Snively, who took 11,706 votes, compared to his 9,900, in the Aug. 26 primary.

A woman? Egad — how unscriptural! We continue:

“I’m a small-business owner,” she said. “I advocate for the issues of small businesses. I’ve been married 15 years. I have four children in the public schools. I go to church. As a matter of fact, I volunteer for the Cub Scouts. I think my values and who I am are more representative of the community.”

Wow — she’s conservative! Kemple has a real fight on his hands. So which of them is more extreme? We’re told:

Those who know both candidates say Kemple’s sharp edges and pointed views can both help him and hurt him. “I don’t think that my ideas are out of the mainstream,” he said in an interview. That view is shared by others.

The meaning of “mainstream” depends on where one lives. In the Florida Ark, Kemple is mainstream. Moving along:

Snively has endorsements from the teachers’ union, former superintendent Earl Lennard and both major newspapers. Kemple is backed by leaders of the tea party, the Tampa 912 Project and the pastors of Bell Shoals, the Hillsdale Baptist Church and the Plant City Church of God.

They both have powerful support, but in the Florida Ark, the most extreme candidate has a big advantage, so we’re betting on Kemple. The runoff election on 04 November 2014.

Copyright © 2014. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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5 responses to “Terry Kemple — He’s Back!

  1. There is a truism about eastern Hillsborough County: When it comes to politics, you can’t tack too far to the right. That adage is being tested this fall as Terry Kemple, possibly Hillsborough’s best-known Christian conservative activist, makes his third run for the School Board.

    Ahhh, heavenly Hillsborough. E. K. Hornbeck, the cynical H. L. Mencken figure in Inherit the Wind, had it right.

  2. This is off-topic but I couldn’t wait for a free discussion day. Is the omniscient Curmudgeon already aware that Ken Ham will be speaking at a creationist convention sponsored by Michael Peroutka, formerly of the League of the South, and that AiG has denied that Peroutka was a board member of the aforementioned League? http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/2014/09/18/ken-hams-organization-denies-facts-about-conference-sponsors/ I forward you this in the hope of establishing my credentials as a willing undercover operative with way more time than sense.

  3. Doctor Stochastic

    I presume that Terry Kemple worships at the Kerry Temple.

  4. “I’ve been married 15 years. I have four children in the public schools. I go to church. As a matter of fact, I volunteer for the Cub Scouts. I think my values and who I am are more representative of the community.”

    Why is ANY of this relevant!? How is ANY of this a qualification for office!? The US Constitution says there shall NEVER be a religious test for office! But even the “moderates” in the GOP act like the Constitution don’t count!

  5. Jill Smith, thanks for the heads up. As regular readers know, Michael Peroutka donated the allosaurus fossil to the Creation Museum, and he is/was a member of the board of the League of the South, a white supremacist organization seeking secession from the USA and re-establishment of the Confederacy. They are Dominionists, so they demand a totalitarian state under Christian interpretations of Biblical law. Dominionism implies the establishment of slavery, because it is sanctioned by the Bible; some members of the LOS are more direct about this than others.