Creationist Wisdom #529: Proof of God

Today’s letter-to-the-editor appears in the Duluth News Tribune of Duluth, Minnesota. It’s titled The proof of God is evident all around us. It doesn’t look like the newspaper has a comments feature.

Because today’s writer isn’t a politician, preacher, or other public figure, we won’t embarrass or promote him by using his full name. We found a professor with his name at the University of Minnesota Duluth, but it’s a common name and the professor probably isn’t our man. We’ll use only the writer’s first name, which is Tom. Excerpts from his letter will be enhanced with our Curmudgeonly commentary and some bold font for emphasis. Here we go!

It is amazing how many News Tribune readers write in denying the existence of God. This includes the Feb. 14 letter, “Existence of God can’t be proven.” They say there is no proof. The Bible says the heavens declare the glory of God.

The bible says the heavens are proof? Actually, when carefully studied with modern instruments, the heavens declare the Big Bang. But Tom has an ark-load of other evidence to offer. For example:

Well, just look at the sun rise over Lake Superior some morning or watch it set in the evening. Or how about the northern lights? Or when there is a sky full of stars? Or what about the beauty of our North Shore? That sounds like nature declaring something!

See? We told you Tom had evidence. Let’s read on:

How can anyone deny his existence? How about the birth of a beautiful baby?

Yeah — how about that? Tom continues:

Fools say there is no God. They say there is no proof. Time and time again science proves the accuracy of the Bible.

Can’t argue about that! Not with Tom, anyway. Here’s more:

If there is no God, then why do people get upset over nothing? Isn’t it illogical and foolish to get so worked up over something or someone that isn’t there or doesn’t exist?

Your Curmudgeon isn’t upset about God. It’s ghastly reasoning that bothers us. Moving along:

The Bible says God has set eternity in the hearts of men and women. This is why people get upset. Deep down, they know God is there. Their pride and arrogance get in the way.

Admit it, dear reader. Put aside your pride and arrogance. Deep down, you know Tom is right. And now we come to the end:

The Bible says there will be scoffers and mockers before Jesus comes back. Jesus is the only way to the father. Receive him now before it is too late. By all these doubting letters I read, it sounds like he is on his way.

Okay, dear reader. You’ve been warned. Now it’s up to you.

Copyright © 2015. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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17 responses to “Creationist Wisdom #529: Proof of God

  1. OK, Tommy boy, ya’ll let me know when the baby jeebus shows up.

  2. Thanks Tom for the advice but I have big plans on improving things in Hell after I get there. And also spending some time with Hitch and the drunken angles on the merry side of hell!!!

  3. How about the birth of an ugly baby? How about those innumerable gray days on Lake Superior when there is only light gray and dark gray with no proclaiming of anything? Why do so many people burn light bulbs at night when God wants it to be dark?

    Speaking of dim bulbs …

  4. That sounds like nature declaring something! It’s said Ben Franklin uttered the adage “fart proudly.” That’s a natural sound for sure.

    The Bible says the heavens declare the glory of God.
    So what, that’s not evidence of anything at all.

    How about the birth of a beautiful baby?
    Evidence? Ever see a deformed or two headed baby?
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/2631324/Two-headed-boy-born-in-Bangladesh.html

    etc., etc., etc.

  5. They say there is no proof. The Bible says the heavens declare the glory of God.
    Let us read the Bible literally. The Bible says, “the heavens declare the glory of God.” That is from Psalm 19. I suggest that you read it. It does not say that there is proof of the existence of God. This is just more of people making up stuff that they wish was there.
    (And wishing away stuff that is there: that the Sun moves from one end of the firmament to the other.)

  6. Ah yes, “the birth of a beautiful baby” is evidence for Tom’s god’s existence.

    As anorexic as it is, if one accepts Tom’s proposition, the flipside thereof is that one must also conclude that this magnanimous baby-provisioning god, whose existence has just been so convincingly established, is also an indiscriminate and profligate abortionist, and an infanticidal psychopath to boot. Several tens of millions of human pregnancies ending in miscarriages or stillbirths annually around the globe, as well as millions of infants and children who die too young, attest with equal force to Tom’s god’s more noxious habits.

  7. This question of Tom’s also appears in AiG materials: “If there is no God, then why do people get upset over nothing? Isn’t it illogical and foolish to get so worked up over something or someone that isn’t there or doesn’t exist?”

    Hence it is concluded that sure enough, atheists really DO believe in God.

    Apparently these people never stop to ask themselves why _they_ spend so much time attacking evolution, if they are convinced that there is really no such thing. CLEARLY THEY ARE FIGHTING THEIR DEEP INNER KNOWLEDGE THAT DARWIN WAS RIGHT AFTER ALL !!! At least according to their own logic.

  8. @hnohf: Apparently it gives cretinists much trouble to fathom the instructive value of reductio ad absurdum as disproof.

    As Curmy pithily observes above, “Your Curmudgeon isn’t upset about God. It’s ghastly reasoning that bothers us.” — to which I would only add that it’s the manifestly detrimental real-world consequences of said ghastly reasoning that are worrisome.

  9. “How about the birth of a beautiful baby?”
    Of course I don’t have Tom’s profound wisdom, but to me the birth of a baby is evidence that the parents got l**d [engaged in coitus] several months before.

  10. Con-Tester usefully calls out

    the manifestly detrimental real-world consequences of said ghastly reasoning that are worrisome

    Exactly. It’s an absolute and basic human right to believe in as many or as few gods, elves, Flying Spaghetti Monsters, Blessed Designers &c &c as one wishes; it’s foolish to argue with that right of belief, and is monstrous to deny it.

    But when beliefs inform outrageous actions–like beheading someone for holding a different belief–then a line is crossed and all bets are off.

  11. If the rising sun is evidence for god, earthquake must be evidence for no god

  12. Tom’s letter is pure poetry. Unfortunately for him, that has nothing to do with whether there is a God who created the universe, and, even if there is, whether He did so in six twenty-four-hour days a few thousand years ago or via a Big Bang 13.5 billion years ago and evolutionary processes thereafter.

    If Tom wants to view the beauties of Nature as “declaring” God’s creation, he’s free to do so. But when he moves to statements about how “science proves the accuracy of the Bible,” he’s demanding that everyone else swallow his ideas even though such statements, when carefully examined, turn out to be false. After all, to use his wording, “why get so upset” about how scientists are anti-God if science keeps validating the Bible? What he won’t acknowledge is that people get upset not about God but about believers’ attempts to force people to accept their ideas about God or else.

    The fundamentalists are the “Christian” equivalent of Stalinists, and creationism the equivalent of Lysenkoism–which also, it should be noted, denied Darwinism (though not evolution), and put those who disagreed in prison or in the ground.

  13. @hnohf notes the argument “If there is no God, then why do people get upset over nothing? Isn’t it illogical and foolish to get so worked up over something or someone that isn’t there or doesn’t exist?”
    There is plenty of working up in the Bible about false gods and idols.

  14. TomS says, about getting worked up over something or someone that isn’t there or doesn’t exist: “There is plenty of working up in the Bible about false gods and idols.”

    Hey, if it’s all so self-evident and proven by the declaration of the heavens, then why bother with the first of the Ten Commandments: “I am the Lord thy God. Thou shalt have no other gods before me.”

  15. aturingtest

    If there is no God, then why do people get upset over nothing? Isn’t it illogical and foolish to get so worked up over something or someone that isn’t there or doesn’t exist?

    I love the way folks like Tom think this lame-brained meme is such a sure-fire gotcha- “ha, foolish atheists, take that!” I don’t get worked up over their non-existent god; I do get upset over the very-existent people like them who think their undoubted right to believe what they want is a privilege to impose the beliefs, or their strictures, on others. There wouldn’t be any fuss if they’d learn to keep their beliefs to themselves; that’s as far as their right to them extends.

  16. Tom’s letter isn’t an argument, it’s a sermon – and somewhat banal.
    I wonder if he thinks the sun really does ‘rise’ and ‘set.’ He may be mistaking metaphor for description.

  17. What would truly be “illogical and foolish” would be to disparage a god which existed. No sane person who believed “deep down” that God existed would think to themselves, “I’m going to piss off God and burn in hell forever, it’ll be fun”.

    “Atheists”, as known to the writer, are simply people who openly acknowledge that God probably does not exist. I am convinced that many outwardly religious folks also do not believe “deep down” that God exists, but will not admit it. They are simply socially religious. My parents were like that – they participated in their church activities and made many lifelong friends there. The social aspects of church appealed to them rather than any religious message. Only later in life when they were quite old did they reveal to me that they did not believe. There is such a stigma attached to atheism that they dared not tell anyone else, and even withheld it from me for many years. I suspect, but do not know, that a number of their friends were also unbelievers. None of them ever spoke about religion outside of church, and frankly, they didn’t talk a lot about it there either.