Creationist Wisdom #542: High School Student

Today’s letter-to-the-editor appears in the Winnipeg Free Press of Winnipeg, Manitoba. It’s titled Evolution versus creation. If you go there, you’ll have to scroll down to the third letter to find it. The newspaper has a comments feature which seems to be for all the letters at that link, but most of the comments are about this one.

Because today’s writer isn’t a politician, preacher, or other public figure, we won’t embarrass or promote him by using his full name. In fact, because the writer is a high school student, we won’t use any name at all. Excerpts from the letter will be enhanced with our Curmudgeonly commentary and some bold font for emphasis. Here we go!

What if it were mandatory to take a creationism course in school — a course that discussed creation and religion, not just the evolutionary theory? [Reference to a local school board controversy.] As students, we are taught to be independent and discover life for ourselves. The current science curriculum is not that; the school system decides that for us.

Dear letter-writer: The school system designs the science curriculum for you because you’re a student! You’re there to learn, not to discover life for yourself. If you want to embark on a voyage of self-discovery, then quit school, sign up as a crewman on a cargo ship, and see the world.

Okay, okay — we won’t lecture the kid. Then he tells us:

What about the other side of things? As a Grade 11 student, I should at least have the option to learn about what I believe to be true in public schools.

But what if you believe in flying saucers? Ah, well, let’s read on:

Evolution is just as much of a faith as creation — we weren’t there observing the Earth form, so how would we know exactly how it happened?

And that, dear student, is why you’re in school. You’re there to learn — or in your case, to unlearn an ark-load of nonsense. The letter continues:

Isn’t science supposed to have the evidence to back up and explain the big questions of life? The universe?

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! Science does have evidence to support scientific theories. But it doesn’t deal with “the big questions of life.” For that, there’s Sunday school. Here’s more:

Isn’t science supposed to be questioned and looked into? That’s how discoveries are made in the first place.

Yes. You may question science, and maybe one day you’ll make some discoveries. But you won’t have a clue how to go about that until you learn what’s already known — and the method by which it was discovered.

And now we come to the end:

The high school curriculum should change to give students the chance to learn about more than just evolution.

Well, kid, maybe one day you’ll run for the school board. Then you’ll have a chance to put your ideas into effect. Until then, let’s see if you’ve got what it takes to graduate from high school. At the rate you’re going, you may not make it.

Oh dear, we said we wouldn’t lecture the kid. Sorry about that. We couldn’t resist.

Copyright © 2015. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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11 responses to “Creationist Wisdom #542: High School Student

  1. One of the creationist commenters on the Winnipeg Free Press page, Really8, is well worth reading as comedy gold. Apparently our knowledge of the world about us is just a matter of opinion, while a lecture on evolution is just a biologist “spouting his propaganda”!

  2. I am finding the “why can’t I learn” arguments from students increasingly irritating. These students have the damned Internet at their fingertips; they don’t even have to go to a Library! They go to school roughly 180 days out of the year, leaving another roughly 180 days to do as they please, study what they will … every year.

    As a student I spent a great deal of time learning all kinds of things that weren’t covered in school. School is where you learn what society wants you to learn. An education is what you get outside of class, by reading, studying, doing, playing, building … you are free, I tell you, to learn anything you wish. Plus all the best Creationism teachers are not in your school system. You will have to seek them out. (Good luck finding one.)

  3. Our Curmudgeon offers some fatherly advice:

    If you want to embark on a voyage of self-discovery, then quit school, sign up as a crewman on a cargo ship, and see the world.

    More specifically, sign up as the ship’s naturalist on board HMS Beagle, see the Galapagos Islands, and change our understanding of the world. Or–as Darwin beat you to that one–find whatever the modern equivalent would be.

    And speaking of the Galapagos, April 2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the founding of the splendid Galapagos Conservation Trust (and yes–he modestly points out–I have been a member of that august body for 20 years).

  4. “Spledid”?

    O Great Hand of Chastisement and Correction! My previous post hath need of Thy succour!

    [*Voice from above*] You want succour? That I cannot provide. But I fixed your earlier typo.

  5. michaelfugate

    Based on the letter, the student has not learned anything about evolution in school even though it has been taught. What makes him or her think he or she is capable of learning anything?

  6. This letter writer is yet another example of how religion ruins minds. Has this young person learned how to learn? Not likely. Will he/she ever advance to intellectual adulthood? Again, unlikely.

  7. 11th grader writes: at least have the option to learn about what I believe to be true in public schools.text
    If you believe it to be true, it sounds like you’ve already learned it, what’s the problem?
    I believe a student needs courage, there are many things that will challenge you, some topics may superficially look too challenging to conquer. There is a certain amount of discomfort one feels when taking on something new. My advice when confronted by something beyond one’s ken or belief system: embrace it, if only to understand what you don’t believe. You’ll at least be well rounded and understand the other side of the controversy, even if you ultimately cling to your preconceived notions.

  8. > “Evolution is just as much of a faith as
    > creation — we weren’t there observing
    > the Earth form, so how would we know
    > exactly how it happened?”
    —————
    And you weren’t there observing the Earth being “created”, so how do you know it did, especially considering there is zero evidence for that? Your usage of the word “faith” is beyond incorrect – you’re lying.

    You weren’t there when your holy book was written, so how do you know that the contents are real or fiction or a mix of both?

    Your lack of sincerity matches your lack of intellectual curiosity – sadly, this is a typical faith-head who considers reason to be a crime against humanity.

  9. “Evolution is just as much of a faith as creation — we weren’t there observing the Earth form, so how would we know exactly how it happened?”
    And police aren’t usually present when a murder is committed, either, but they use evidence to determine who did it and how. Today’s historians weren’t present at events two hundred years ago, but ditto. Likewise, scientists use evidence to support evolution.

    Creationists claim to do the same to support creation, but they cheat: they start with creation and then cherry-pick “evidence” (which they do not examine carefully) to fit.

    It might be said that modern evolutionists do likewise–start with the assumption of evolution and work backward. But if evidence favoring evolution hadn’t been piling up since before Darwin was born (notably geological evidence about the Earth’s age), nineteenth-century scientists would never have accepted his ideas. And despite what creationists say, the evidence has continued to pile up.

  10. I am finding the “why can’t I learn” arguments from students increasingly irritating. These students have the damned Internet at their fingertips; they don’t even have to go to a Library! They go to school roughly 180 days out of the year, leaving another roughly 180 days to do as they please, study what they will … every year.

    Most kids like this one robably don’t ppay that much attention in class anyway. They don’t want to learn; they just want to hear in class what Mommy and Daddy tell them at home and good Parson Weems says in church.