Ken Ham: Reason Is Evil

For your entertainment, dear reader, we are pleased to bring you another rant from Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo) — the Australian entrepreneur who has become the ayatollah of Appalachia. He’s famed for his creationist ministry, Answers in Genesis (AIG) and for the mind-boggling Creation Museum.

As so often before, ol’ Hambo is angry. We imagine that once again he’s red in the face, foaming at the mouth, and rolling around chewing the carpet. We just found this on his blog: National Day of Prayer or Reason? Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

Today across America [the post is dated 07 May], Christians are gathering to celebrate the National Day of Prayer. Every year since 1952 this day — the first Thursday of May — is set aside to pray for America.

That’s nice, but where’s the rant we promised you? Here it comes:

Our nation is rapidly becoming more secular by the day. Instead of basing its thinking on God’s Word, America is doing whatever is right in its own eyes (Judges 21:25). We need to pray that the gospel will spread across this nation because only the gospel will change hearts and lives and bring repentance and a renewed commitment to God and to His Word.

One sign of this increasingly secular mindset is the growing opposition to Christian symbols and beliefs in the culture. For example, in response to the National Day of Prayer, secularists have launched the National Day of Reason.

Reason? Egad, how un-Christian! Let’s read on:

The groups and individuals behind the National Day of Reason oppose the holding of the National Day of Prayer and instead encourage people to “to be visible and active on this day to set the right example for how to effect positive change.”

The scoundrels! Hambo continues:

The National Day of Reason really represents the effort by secularists to see their religion of naturalism and reason (worship of man and nature) imposed on the culture. Again, this reveals that there is a battle between two religions going on in our culture — the battle between God’s Word and man’s word.

Let’s be sure we all understand this. The National Day of Reason imposes its “religion” on the culture. But the National Day of Prayer somehow doesn’t? Or does Hambo think it’s okay to impose only his mode of thought on the culture? Here’s more:

Now, it should be pointed out that the secularists’ own belief system doesn’t even have an absolute standard for deciding what is a “right example” or what “positive change” is. You see, without God and His Word, we have no foundation for deciding what is right and what is wrong.

Yes, Hambo, we see. Moving along:

If there is no Creator to tell us how to live, why shouldn’t we all just do what is right in our own eyes? And, of course, what is right in my eyes might not be right in your eyes — so, really, no one can say that anyone else is wrong!

Ah, we understand. Without his version of religion, Hambo would be unable to know right from wrong. He fears that he might become a raving beast — like you, dear reader. Another excerpt:

Only if there is a Creator and a revelation from the Creator (the Bible) can we have an absolute standard for right and wrong. And, ultimately, why do the secularists care anyway? From their perspective, when secularists die, they cease to exist, so why does it matter what anyone believes?

Yeah, who cares? Here’s one more excerpt, and it’s a biggie:

This year I encourage you to be in prayer for religious freedom across the nation. We are quickly losing our religious liberty. Christians are no longer being allowed to act on their beliefs but are being expected not to express disagreement with things like “gay” marriage and abortion. Those who dare to speak out against these moral issues or who refuse to support or celebrate them are being punished by the government. We need to pray that God will bring our leaders to repentance and that they will protect — not destroy — the religious freedom that America has always enjoyed and that our US Constitution promises in its very first amendment.

Yes, we must pray for Hambo’s freedom — and no one else’s. The rest of the rant is Hambo’s request that you pray for his Ark project, including his struggle to get millions in sales tax rebates, and he also wants you to pray for his Creation Museum.

But whatever you do, stay away from that reason stuff. It’s just yucky!

Copyright © 2015. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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23 responses to “Ken Ham: Reason Is Evil

  1. Derek Freyberg

    Euthyphro, anyone?

  2. Ken Ham, why is EVERYTHING either black or white, right or wrong, either/or with you? Don’t you thing it’s possible for people to be BOTH prayerful AND reasoned? Are you really meaning to imply that people who pray can’t reason as well??

    As far as religious freedom is concerned, you are free to pray all you want, sir. What I can’t understand is why you fear reason. Is it because you realize that if people start using their God-given ability to reason, they will no longer be as supportive of your Creation Museum or your totally incredible (in the true sense of the word) Ark Encounter?

    Judging from the way you carry on so, one would think that is the case.

  3. Is it just me, or does anybody else see very little difference between what Ham wrote here and what Nancy Pearcey scrawled a few days ago?

    It has to be coincidence, right?

    Right?

  4. Diogenes' Lamp

    “The National Day of Reason really represents the effort by secularists to see their religion of naturalism and reason”

    Stop right there. Reason is a religion now, according to Ham. Hmm. Why are creationists always accusing us of religion, but we never accuse them of using reason?

    So, since math is a subset of reason, therefore math is a set of religious beliefs now? Where does this madness end? Ken Ham must have gotten his epistemology from Calvin. No not that Calvin:

    And again:

  5. “Today across America [the post is dated 07 May], Christians are gathering to celebrate the National Day of Prayer.”

    Interesting statement in that the so-called NDP was intended only for Christians, according to Ham. Given the number of other religions in America besides Christianity, no one else, according to Ham, is being asked to participate. Ah, but then all other religion must be based on reason, but that’s an erroneous conclusion, right? No, the NDP is clearly meant only for Christians, regardless of any non-Christian beliefs.

    “Every year since 1952 this day — the first Thursday of May — is set aside to pray for America.”

    Yes, the fundies pushed this one through the Congress, branding anyone who didn’t support it as an anti-Christian commie or atheist, like the pledge of allegiance was.

  6. Diogenes' Lamp

    But continuing:

    “their religion of naturalism and reason (worship of man and nature)”

    Ugh. First of all, naturalism and reason are not the worship of anything. If you’re only using reason, it cannot by itself lead to worship. If you’re worshipping, you’re using something else besides reason.

    And secondly, even if you worship a *real thing*, that is still not a religion. To be a religion, you have to worship, seek the favor of, or avoid the disfavor of invisible people whose purposes and wishes are knowable. If they’re not invisible, but real visible people, seeking their favor is not a religion. People may worship football, but football is real, so it’s not a religion, and if they’re worshipping, they’re not using reason.

    ” imposed on the culture.”

    That tears it. What is it with right-wingers and the word “impose”? Every time anybody else gets equal rights or, heaven forbid, uses their right to free speech to disagree with the Right, they shriek “You’re IMPOSING your values!”

    As Curm aptly pointed out, if the Day of Reason *imposes* a “religion of reason”, then the Day of Prayer *imposes* the Christian religion or some generic form of it.

    However, right-wing propaganda tricks consist largely of using verbs in biased, discriminatory ways. Always pay attention to their *verbs *, and challenge them on their verbs. When we describe evidence and rational conclusions, Ham says we “impose our religion.” When Ham & creationists demand taxpayer funding for their Christian ministries, they “share their faith.” We “impose”, they “share”. Every paragraph from every social conservative does this, and other verb-tricks like this. We must challenge all their discriminatory uses of verbs.

  7. Dave Luckett

    Mr Ham thinks that morality can only be explained by the edict of his god.

    But any explanation of morality has to be able to account for two facts:

    One: All human societies whatsoever developed moral codes.

    Two: Although these moral codes have some very general provisions in common, those are relatively few, albeit basic, and the codes themselves otherwise differ widely.

    It should be plainly obvious that the Abrahamic God does not explain the ubiquity of morality – until relatively recently very few societies had ever heard of this god and his instructions. If it is said that this god is nevertheless the ultimate source of all morality, how are the very different moral codes to be explained?

    Hence, Ham’s god is neither necessary nor sufficient to explain human morality.

  8. Let us now bow our heads and share a moment of reason. All are welcome to join us as we celebrate rational thought.

    “For God so loved the world, that He gave us the ability to reason…”

  9. “Now, it should be pointed out that the secularists’ own belief system doesn’t even have an absolute standard for deciding what is a “right example” or what “positive change” is. You see, without God and His Word, we have no foundation for deciding what is right and what is wrong.”

    No foundation indeed. Except for our modern legal traditions which are intended to replace the discretionary judgement systems theocrats long for a return to.

    When our modern legal system can be perverted into creating an exception in favor of mysticism it is blessed and holy. When it works correctly and keeps religions from causing cultural regression, it becomes the culmination of all the sources of oppression that fundies can think of.

    I suspect that religion formed the basis for the origin of politics, the theocrats are of course furious that they have gotten themselves tossed from dictating to the mainstream dialogue.

    The terrible irony of it all is that the very framework used to judge reality by fundies prevents the majority from ever acknowledging that secular government wouldn’t even exist if it weren’t for the need to protect culture from the assured regression and stagnation that mysticism cannot help but bring.

  10. Hambo still acknowledges we do the deciding. All he wants, is we include his god in the decision making. I don’t think no one stops him. Why, he insists everyone must be like him, defies belief.

  11. “secularists to see their religion of naturalism and reason (worship of man and nature)”

    I’m so glad Ham can tell me what I worship because I sure as hell didn’t know it. All these years not praying and not tithing and not prostrating myself…now I’m set on the straight and narrow.

  12. Richard Bond

    If Ham’s god had told him that it was wrong to exploit the Tibetan earthquake in the way that he did, then it might comprise (very tenuous) grounds for ascribing some practical use to this mythical being.

  13. When he is not asking people to p(r)ay for his coming Ark Park, Ham is greatly concerned about what he calls “the culture” — presumably meaning primarily American culture. He always talks about “the culture” going to the dogs — e.g. “one sign of this increasingly secular mindset is the growing opposition to Christian symbols and beliefs in the culture”. Sometimes he talks about our “dying culture”, since it is supposedly quickly eroding. One of his resources is about how Genesis is the “key to reclaiming the culture”:

    https://answersingenesis.org/media/video/creation/key-to-reclaiming/

    The implication seems to be that “the culture” once was and properly should be distinctly Christian (and YEC/Bible-literalist at that). Now “the culture” has tragically been STOLEN by “secularists” and “evolutionary thinking”, and fundamentalist Christians need to stand up and boldly RECLAIM what is rightfully theirs, namely total cultural dominance.

    Ken Ham is an alarmist above all. The notion that specific religions are very properly SUBCULTURES, and that in a pluralistic society no one religion has the right to define itself as “THE culture”, is utterly alien to Ham’s way of thinking. Whenever some group points out that in a nation with no state church the states should not display (say) nativity scenes for Christmas, Ham interprets this as vicious opposition to, and hatred of, Christianity as such. Never mind that private citizens can display all the nativity scenes they want and paint the Ten Commandments on every wall of their house.

    Another big issue is gay rights. Apparently it is an utter horror to Ham that it in the larger “culture”, it is no longer politically correct to say that homosexuals are dirty sinners who should have no right whatsoever to act on their feelings. This, in his worldview, means that Christians are now unfairly gagged and cannot speak up for their faith-based position.

    Actually they can. They must however realize that if they do, very many people will regard them as bigots. And that in itself is deeply uncorfortable if one feels that one’s religious ideas should self-evidently dominate and permeate the entire “culture”.

  14. anevilmeme

    Mr Ham’s premise is wrong, science and reason aren’t religions.

    The question is does he know that or does he really believe his own rhetoric?

  15. waldteufel

    We see that Hambo continues to plumb the depths of paranoid madness.

  16. Answering anything this delusional dimwit says is like hitting a brick wall with a marshmallow bat!!! The only thing that comes of it is the possibility that it might cause another not-so badly delusional to start to think.

  17. One could well point out that fundamentalists have appropriated the signs of Christianity. The word “Christian” being used exclusively for their modern sect, “fundamentals” as if applied to the fundamentals of Christianity. Their imagination as if it had anything to do with what the Bible says. Symbols like the Cross and the tablets of the Decalog, and the holiday of Christmas.

  18. Ah, Hambone, once again you make it clear to anyone paying attention that religion — at least your brand of it — has no relation to reason or reality. And as for your boat that couldn’t float, as far as I know you’re perfectly free to build the thing, but you can’t expect tax payers to buy it for you.

  19. waldteufel

    We should not sell Hambo short. He is smart enough to know that education and reason are deadly enemies of the garbage that he peddles about the veracity of his well-thumped bible. A populace well-grounded in reason and critical thinking skills directly and negatively affects Hambo’s ability to fleece his drooling flock.

  20. This is pretty much secularists demanding equal time. Note the president does NOT have a law that he must declare the National Day of Reason, people have just decided to do so. At the behest of secularists Rhode Island governor Lincoln Chafee also proclaimed the National Day of Reason. Making him one of only a few that did so.
    As for the National Day of Prayer it is a very eely formed legislation. Since only the president has a requirement, only the president has standing to take the law to court. This gives the impression of an official endorsement of prayer and religion, even though only the president himself is the one affected.
    While a lot of hay is made of the National Day of Prayer, it isn’t even a day off for federal employees. It doesn’t even qualify as a Hallmark holiday. It is right up there with National corn on the cob day (June 11) for its nonrelevance. While I don’t like it, there are bigger fish to fry, like the tax exemption for churches which is a much more pernicoius breech of the first amendment as well as expensive for the rest of us.

  21. The good news is, the average Joe pick up truck guy would have to be in a bad mood and out of beer to bother reading this swill form out hero Hambone. Or depressed. Or psychotic. Or all of the above.

  22. Only if there is a Creator and a revelation from the Creator (the Bible) can we have an absolute standard for right and wrong. And, ultimately, why do the secularists care anyway? From their perspective, when secularists die, they cease to exist, so why does it matter what anyone believes?

    So no one who doesn’t believe in the Bible can be anything but evil? Of course, that’s exactly what the fundies do think.

    And how, exactly, do we actually know the Bible is literally the Word of God in the first place? How can we be sure? We can’t, actually, by rational means, which is where faith comes in — but I’d rather have evidence. And considering the grisly history of Christianity (which, to be fair, is no worse than that of, say, Islam–but arguably no better either), the evidence we have is at best ambiguous.

  23. “The rest of the rant is Hambo’s request that you pray for his Ark project, including his struggle to get millions in sales tax rebates, and he also wants you to pray for his Creation Museum.”

    I prayed that the Ark Project would be dropped before wasting a lot of good people’s money….and I prayed that the Creation Museum would be declared a threat to the public good and closed while the damages are assessed.