Creationist Wisdom #583: The Theocrat

Today’s letter-to-the-editor appears in the Dickinson Press of Dickinson, North Dakota. It’s titled Putting the Glendive Creationist Museum on my bucket list. The newspaper doesn’t have a comments section.

Because the writer isn’t a politician, preacher, or other public figure, we won’t embarrass or promote him by using his full name. He generates a lot of letters to that newspaper, but that doesn’t qualify for full-name treatment. His first name is Craig. Excerpts from his letter will be enhanced with our Curmudgeonly commentary and some bold font for emphasis. Here we go!

So Glendive, Mont., has a Creationist Museum. It is too bad the group Americans United for Separation of Church and State decided to squelch plans for student field trips to the museum. It’s also too bad that it is perfectly OK for students to be indoctrinated with the Evolutionary Theory in school, but they aren’t allowed to be exposed to the Creationist viewpoint.

He’s talking about this, Youngsters’ Trip to Dinosaur Museum Dashed by Atheists. It’s been all over the internet, but we didn’t blog about it — until now. Let’s read on:

After all, evolution is a theory, and in the dictionary I have, it states that a theory, among other things, is a hypothesis, a guess, a conjecture, a speculative opinion — hardly absolute fact.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! Craig is yet another creationist whose only reference material, besides the bible, is a dictionary — and he reads them both selectively. His letter continues:

What bothers me about evolution is that plants and animals — and all living creatures — have to have things in place before they can multiply efficiently. In other words, parts need to be predisposed to operate efficiently. Otherwise, the creative process just doesn’t work. Timeless trial and error is not vested with intelligent design. Creativity requires planning and not blind fate.

That’s routine creationist stuff. Here’s where it gets really good:

I really don’t like this idea of separation of church and state.

Wow! We’re confident that Craig’s feelings are those of all other creationists, but this is the first time one of them has come out of his closet and admitted it. We briefly thought of titling this post “Out of the Closet,” but we didn’t want to mislead anyone searching for something we don’t offer here. Anyway, moving along:

To me, there should be a cooperative sharing between the two entities. So, I feel this is something that the founding fathers got wrong.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! In Salem and Philadelphia: A Tale of Two Cities, we contrasted the insanity of the Salem witch trials and the genius of the American Revolution. The difference between Cotton Mather’s Salem and Ben Franklin’s Philadelphia was largely due to the Enlightenment’s influence, but it’s also likely that the memory of Salem helped to inform the attitude of the Founders. Franklin, for example, was born only 13 years after the witchcraft trials. It’s likely that the Founders, although most were younger than Franklin, remembered Salem as vividly as we remember Pearl Harbor. But Craig thinks they were all wrong.

Here’s another excerpt, in which Craig seems to be oblivious to the nightmare of theocratic government:

When it comes to knowledge, people should be allowed to be exposed to various ideas, and it would be up to the individual as to what one wants to accept and what one wants to reject.

That sounds nice. But when the government is a religious institution, those who make the wrong decision will be executed for witchcraft — or as happens today in certain countries, beheaded. On with the letter:

I will put the Glendive Creationist Museum on my bucket list of things to visit. I find it fascinating to entertain diverse perspectives on controversial topics.

And now we come to the end:

Not everything is always cut and dry, so speculating about the many possibilities and sharing points of view should be an acceptable part of everyone’s educational and lifetime experience.

Craig has shared his point of view with us, and even though he doesn’t like the fact that we have separation of church and state, no one will bother him. Does Craig understand that? Obviously not. Anyway, we hope he enjoys his visit to the Glendive Creationist Museum. To find it, all he needs to do is follow the River of Drool to its source.

Copyright © 2015. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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11 responses to “Creationist Wisdom #583: The Theocrat

  1. Christine Janis

    “He’s talking about this, Youngsters’ Trip to Dinosaur Museum Dashed by Atheists.”

    If you look at that report —- that lovely museum diorama that those poor youngsters are being denied — I’m pretty sure that that’s actually the Museum of the Rockies (i.e., the first largest dinosaur museum in Montana).

  2. To Craig’s overt theocratic yearnings, our Curmudgeon responds:

    Wow! We’re confident that Craig’s feelings are those of all other creationists, but this is the first time one of them has come out of his closet and admitted it

    It’s almost refreshing! When was the last time you heard a Creationist being so honest?

    As Abraham Lincoln once said, contemplating the possibility of the electoral victory by the Know-Nothings (something like the Tea Party of the 1850’s):

    When it comes to this I should prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty – to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure, and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.

  3. “I will put the Glendive Creationist Museum on my bucket list of things to visit. I find it fascinating to entertain diverse perspectives on controversial topics.”
    Yeah, a creacrap museum is by far the most reliable source to learn about evolution …..

  4. SC said: That sounds nice. But when the government is a religious institution,…

    When people like Craig, and the religious (self-)righteous make it so. They are desperately and tirelessly working towards that end, given such nonsense as religious beliefs, only christian of course, trump others’ beliefs in any given situation as enacted in a number of states. And of course our friends at the Dishonesty Institute would like nothing better to go along with this christian sharia nonsense.

  5. Ken Phelps

    You know, when a creation museum is on your bucket list you really need to get out more.

  6. Craig somehow forgot to point out that when he endorses a cooperation of church and state, he means his particular version of evangelical Christianity. No liberal Christians, likely no Catholics or Jews, and certainly none of those other so-called “religions” that “non-Americans” practice. This is the part of the “fundamentalist, creationist” mindset that truly frightens me the most. Just take a look at the historic record of violence between differing faiths, or even between different sects. Truly horrifying!

  7. docbill1351

    Lemmy echoes a sentiment expressed by Ann Coulter when she said of the Episcopal Church, “well, it’s hardly a church.”

    The yammering theocrat-wannabes only “think” they want a theocracy. I would delight in the shock on their faces when they discover that other theocrats with other theocratic ideas are actually not in charge and the real persecution begins.

  8. I’ve always thought the expression was “cut and dried” not “cut and dry.” That riles me up almost as much as “I could care less” in place of “I couldn’t care less.”

  9. GregS, I am no longer required to comment on anyone’s use of English idiom. I understand your distress, but my own discriminators burned out so many years ago that when I look at “cut and dry,” or “hone in on” where I would write “home in on,” or “infer” where I would write “imply,” all I feel is relief that I don’t have to take out my red pen and react.

    Not saying you should become as jaded as I am. Just sharing the perspective of a weary old English teacher.

  10. Dave Luckett

    What Craig really doesn’t like is the separation of his church from State power, and hence his own separation from privilege.

    Evidence for this proposition: What would Craig’s reaction be to the establishment of some other Church than his?

  11. @Dave Luckett
    Question for a philosopher: Is this question an example of what ethicists call the Veil of ignorance?