Creationist Wisdom #595: Aim High!

Today’s letter-to-the-editor appears in the West Sussex County Times of Horsham, in the county of Sussex, England. The letter is titled Glorious future. The newspaper has a comments feature, but there aren’t any comments yet.

Unless the letter-writer is a politician, preacher, or other public figure, we won’t embarrass or promote him by using his full name. But today we’ve got a preacher — The Rev PADDY BERESFORD, of St John’s Church in West Sussex. It’s an Anglican church, and therefore unlikely to be creationist. Technically, this doesn’t belong in our collection, but we can’t resist. Excerpts from the rev’s letter will be enhanced with our Curmudgeonly commentary and some bold font for emphasis. Here we go!

In the ‘X files’, Mulder says, ‘When science can’t offer an explanation, can’t we turn to the fantastic?’ Scully replies, ‘What I find fantastic is any notion that there is anything beyond science.’

What does that have to do with anything? Be patient, it’s coming:

Stephen Hawkins [sic] in his conclusion of ‘A brief History of Time’ says: ‘The usual scientific approach of constructing a mathematical model cannot answer the question of why there should be a universe for the model to describe.

Stephen Hawkins? We think he has some connection to Sadie Hawkins Day. Let’s read on:

‘Why does the universe go to all the bother of existing?’ Science just can’t answer that question.

Science is so limited. It’s for fools! The rev continues:

The scientific age has produced a society that walks through life with its gaze fixed almost entirely on the present.

So true. So tragically true! Here’s more:

People with faith are different, here, vision is not limited to the present because God has revealed certain facts about an eternal future that is far superior to anything we know here.

[*Curmudgeon swoons*] Moving along:

We are therefore a hopeful people whose eyes gaze naturally on the ‘now’ but also on a glorious future.

The rev concludes his inspiring letter with what he says is a quote from C.S. Lewis:

Aim at heaven and you will have the earth thrown in. Aim at the earth and you will get neither.

So there you are. It wasn’t a creationist letter, but it was a good letter, and a worthy addition to our collection.

Copyright © 2015. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

7 responses to “Creationist Wisdom #595: Aim High!

  1. I initially misread your header as “Am High”, which made me wonder quite what I was getting into . . . Then I realized that it was, of course, a quote from the rev that explains so much about his letter. I hope they’ve put a padlock on the communion wafers.

    ‘Why does the universe go to all the bother of existing?’ Science just can’t answer that question.

    Perhaps because it’s a blitheringly stupid question.

    The scientific age has produced a society that walks through life with its gaze fixed almost entirely on the present.

    Which is why the scientific community is focusing so much on the coming climate disaster while those future-thinkin’ theological types are sticking their fingers in their ears and going “Nya nya nya can’t hear you, the Lawd has nurtured us so far”, I guess.

    Snipery (and the likelihood of extinction) aside, I do wonder where the rev is coming from with this accusation. A few months ago, I watched the ESA land a probe (albeit with complication) on a cometary nucleus a few kilometres wide after a decade-long rendezvous mission. Just in the past couple of days, we’ve seen a similar feat as a NASA craft, after a similarly long mission, has whipped through the Pluto system. In my lifetime I have seen both of these adventures go from “so far in the future that they’re science fiction” to a reality: in other words, I’ve been privileged to watch the future happen.

    Theology has produced, in this time, absolutely nothing to match this.

  2. In the ‘X files’, Mulder says, ‘When science can’t offer an explanation, can’t we turn to the fantastic?’ Scully replies, ‘What I find fantastic is any notion that there is anything beyond science.’

    What I find fantastic is that anyone could be such a bozo as to quote The X-Files as proof of anything. Why, it’s almost like criticizing Murphy Brpown for raising a child out of wedlock, except that no one would be stupid enough to–er, wait a minute. . . .

    ‘Why does the universe go to all the bother of existing?’ Science just can’t answer that question.
    Why did God go to all the bother of creating the universe? Religion can’t answer that question, though when St. Augustine was asked, he’s said to have replied, “Preparing Hell for people who ask such questions!”

  3. michaelfugate

    The scientific age has produced a society that walks through life with its gaze fixed almost entirely on the present.

    And so was Buddhism’s 500 years before Christianity….

  4. Dave Luckett

    Good point, michealfugate. It’s far more plainly a characteristic of Buddhist thought than science. Not that it renders the Rev’s assertion valid, of course. But wasn’t it Jesus who told us to take no thought for the morrow?

    I’m so confused now.

  5. @Eric Lipps: to be precise Augustinus of Hippo wrote

    How, then, shall I respond to him who asks, “What was God doing before he made heaven and earth?” I do not answer, as a certain one is reported to have done facetiously (shrugging off the force of the question). “He was preparing hell,” he said, “for those who pry too deep.”

    http://www.ccel.org/ccel/augustine/confessions.xiv.html

    Chapter XII.
    Especially the subsequent chapters are worth reading as it contains perhaps the best analysis of what time means ever written down.

  6. Letter writer: “Stephen Hawkins [sic]”

    He’s probably also subconsciously thinking “Dawkins.” One of the interesting effects of Morton’s Demon (and of a related but different demon that I’ll describe another time) is to confuse 2 different words that push the same emotional button.

    SC: “So there you are. It wasn’t a creationist letter…”

    You know my drill: that there are so many definitions of “creationist” that I find the word worse than useless. Case in point, some readers would insist that it is a “creationist” letter. And I’m sure you agree that, had he added a more paragraphs he would have been unable to resist bashing “Darwinism.”

  7. “God has revealed certain facts about an eternal future”. well eternal until the invisible friend destroys the world. Sort of dollar store kind of eternity but if you don’t think about it too much you can feel pretty good.