Self-Published Genius #36: Marine Technologist

We haven’t had one of these since last December, but today we have another addition to our series about Self-Published Geniuses, where we bring you news of authors with a vanity press book in which the author claims to have made paradigm-shattering discoveries, and announces his work by hiring a press release service.

The press release for this one is titled Evidence from Both Sides on the Basic Theories of Life Creation vs. Evolution from Outskirts Press, from something called PR Buzz. It says:

Outskirts Press announces the latest highly anticipated religion and education book from Leland NC author Matthew Watts.

It says this book is “highly anticipated.” But before proceeding further, we need to confirm that it qualifies for our collection. Was it published by a vanity press? No problem. The website of Outskirts Press makes it quite obvious that if you pay them, they’ll publish whatever it is that you’ve written. If you’re willing to pay extra, they’ll provide illustrations and even help you write it. What a great outfit!

Okay. We’ve got a vanity press book and we’ve got the author’s press release. Let’s dig in and see what it says, with some bold font added by us for emphasis.

… Outskirts Press Inc. has published Creation vs. Evolution: A Look at the Religions of Science by Matthew Watts. The author’s most recent book to date is a 5.5 x 8.5 paperback in the religion and education category and is available worldwide on book retailer websites such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

We found it at Amazon: Creation vs Evolution: A Look at the Religions of Science. It’s only $24.95 in paperback — what a bargain! There are no reviews yet.

Let’s read on from the press release:

“Which is the best theory Creation or Evolution?” asks author Watts. “Which theory presents the better interpretation of the evidence?”

Isn’t that the same question you’ve been asking yourself, dear reader? Then this is the book for you! We continue:

This book was written in the hope of helping readers with these questions and hopefully lead them to do their own research. Watts’ family and friends have constantly asked him questions dealing with these two theories so he decided to write this book to not only help them but everyone else as well.

This book was written to help you. Isn’t that wonderful? Here’s more:

260 pages in length Creation vs. Evolution: A Look at the Religions of Science is being aggressively promoted to appropriate markets with a focus on the religion and education category.

Wowie — it’s 260 pages long! And it’s being “aggressively promoted.” That’s great! But what about the author? The press release informs us:

Matthew Watts has an Associate’s degree in Applied Sciences in Marine Technology. He has constantly studied science and kept up with the latest discoveries. Mr. Watts has a profound interest in science and he collects science text books to continually gain more knowledge and understanding about science and to keep up with the latest of what is being taught.

An Associate’s degree in Applied Sciences in Marine Technology? Wow — that’s probably a two-year degree from a community college. Watts sounds like the perfect author for such a book. But wait — there’s more:

Mr. Watts became a Christian at the age of ten. He believes in the creation theory but always studies all new evidences presented from both the creationist and evolutionist side to increase his knowledge and understanding on the subject.

Ah, the author is a creationist! There’s no doubt about it, dear reader. This is the book you’ve been waiting for. Get it now! Your Curmudgeon is pleased to have brought you this information.

Copyright © 2015. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

16 responses to “Self-Published Genius #36: Marine Technologist

  1. Mister Barnabas

    “It says this book is “highly anticipated.”

    Very true. I anticipated creationists writing more stupid books.

    They did.

  2. I’ll think about getting it after I read the review in Nature.

  3. Mister Barnabas

    Speaking of books, I have a question about how high school textbooks in USA present theory of evolution. Has anyone published a comparison chart of the five top biology textbooks to show what does and doesn’t covered?

    For example I’d like to see if many textbooks explain to high school students how human chromosome #2 gives us important evidence of a merger and helps explain why humans have fewer pairs of chromosomes than our evolutionary cousins.

    When I have asked Americans how much they learned about evolution in high school most say they learned nothing. Surely that has changed with the current generation. But how much?

  4. Why would any sane person care about the opinions of a junior college educated marine technologist concerning deep and difficult issues of cosmological origins? Not to invoke arguments from authority, but we are supposed to stack this guy’s ideas up with the likes of Darwin, Gould, Hawking, Einstein, or Lemaitre? Really? Not in my shop . . .

  5. What original research has this guy done that leads him to his insights?

  6. retiredsciguy asks: “What original research has this guy done that leads him to his insights?”

    Didn’t you read the press release? It tells you: “he collects science text books to continually gain more knowledge.” Isn’t that enough?

  7. Dave Luckett

    I’m not giving this guy any money, and if I haven’t read it, I’m not reviewing it. I see that there are two comments now on the Amazon page, both one-stars, but neither say that they’ve read it. Anyway, commenting only invites a dogpile from idiots.

    If you know books or publishing, everything about this screams “fruitloop with enough money to self-publish”. It would have cost him a pretty penny to get it out there, and it’ll only be available through Amazon and his vanity press.

    Anybody can do this. Anything that can be put on media of any sort can be published, and you can pay someone to “publicise” it by writing “press releases” that absolutely no professional will ever glance at. It constitutes a bullhorn for people whose crackpottery is too rococo even for letters to the local weekly. But it’s only a tiny little bullhorn. To make an actual noise, he’d have to spend way, way more, and he hasn’t got it, no matter what overriding compulsion afflicts him. This is an industry that takes cash only.

    Don Maquis is said to have compared publishing poetry with dropping rose petals into the Grand Canyon and waiting for the echo. This guy is trying the same trick with mouse turds.

  8. Speaking of books, I have a question about how high school textbooks in USA present theory of evolution. Has anyone published a comparison chart of the five top biology textbooks to show what does and doesn’t covered?

    For example I’d like to see if many textbooks explain to high school students how human chromosome #2 gives us important evidence of a merger and helps explain why humans have fewer pairs of chromosomes than our evolutionary cousins.

    When I have asked Americans how much they learned about evolution in high school most say they learned nothing. Surely that has changed with the current generation. But how much?

    My aunt spent decades in the textbook publishing industry and once explained to me that Texas is a major “adoption state,” meaning that a book likely to sell well in Texas will be favored nationwide by publishers over one that might sell less well there. And in Texas, a state board of education selects the textbooks, and or decades that board has been under the thumb of fundamentalists. So a small lobbying group in one state can determine, thanks to the cowardice and greed of the publishing industry, what will and what won’t be taught about evolution.

  9. Guys, guys, c’mon. You’re being too hard on him. All he wants is for us to do our own research. I’m in my basement lab right now, growing bacteria, dissecting neighborhood pets, examining fossils I dug up in my backyard, doing a little electron microscopy, and splitting a few atoms. I’m looking for my own ‘evidences’ that evolution is a lie!

  10. Eric – generally true about the publishing industry, but I must speak up for one publishing group: The Biological Science Curriculum Study. http://www.bscs.org/ BSCS is located in Colorado Springs, and a former director was our neighbor. I had the good fortune to work on a chapter on immunology that was a new topic for inclusion in their Blue Version. The BSCS folks knew that their texts would most likely not be adopted by Texas, but they also knew that their texts were solid on science. Most of their resources are grounded in Dobzhansky’s statement “Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution”

  11. SC chides,
    “Didn’t you read the press release? It tells you: “he collects science text books to continually gain more knowledge.” Isn’t that enough?”

    Well, by that standard, I should be a genius by now. I collected enough jr. high science texts to fill a library while serving on several textbook selection committees. Every member of every selection committee on which I served made sure any Earth Science text we selected did a good job with evolution and explaining radiometric dating. We had a lot of good texts to select from; I hope that’s still the case today. The last time I was on such a committee was in the mid-’90s. (I am Retired Sci Guy, after all.)

  12. Dave Luckett

    I’m told that the fundamental (heh!) problem with education in evolution is that many middle school science teachers are not biology majors, nor even science majors, and they are wary of flak from fundamentalist parents and community groups, so they don’t teach evolution, or if they do, they don’t advocate for it.

    I don’t blame them. All politics is local politics, and few have absorbed that truth more thoroughly than the creationist noise machine. Mike Elzinga speaks of having Dwayne Gish and other undesirables actually enter the classroom to try to bully and browbeat the teacher. In the face of active intimidation like that, it would take committment and conviction actively to teach evolution, and there aren’t enough hours in the schedule to deal with the aggravation.

  13. I haven’t researched the situation in other states, but in Ohio there was a major shift from Junior Highs (7th & 8th grades; some districts 7th – 9th) to Middle Schools (6th -8th) in the 1980s. In Ohio, Jr. High science teachers required Secondary certification (7 – 12) in a specific subject area (Chem., Biol., Phys., Earth Sci., General Sci., or Comprehensive), while Middle School teachers could have Secondary certification for teaching 7th & 8th grades in their subject of certification, while Elementary certified teachers could teach any subject. This gave principals great flexibility in teacher assignments, but also lessened the rigor of certain subjects, esp. science and math.

    As far as worrying about flak from creationist parents, I never had any problems, although I did have one Jehovah’s Witness mother tell me they “don’t believe in glaciers”. I didn’t change my curriculum because of her comment, though. (I mentioned this several years ago on this blog, if it sounds familiar.) I did have a few students who asked if I believed in God, however. Since they didn’t define “God”, I’d just answer in the affirmative and let it go at that. We didn’t have time to discuss theology in the science class.

  14. “don’t believe in glaciers”? What do they think those flowing piles of ice and snow in Greenland are?

  15. @abeastwood: I didn’t ask her, but I assumed she meant the Ice Age ice sheets covering the northern half of N. America. Probably because in her “worldview”, the Earth wasn’t old enough to account for an Ice Age. Almost certainly something she heard from her preacher or whatever.