John Oller Petitions the US Supreme Court

The last time we posted about this woeful case was about six weeks ago — John Oller Loses His Appeal — Again. Only your Curmudgeon is following this litigation, and our only source of information comes from our vast network of clandestine operatives. The next few indented paragraphs provide background information, which most of you can skip:

In late December of 2011, John Oller filed a federal civil-rights lawsuit against the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where he was (and apparently still is) a professor. The complaint alleged that faculty members of the university’s Communicative Disorders Department discriminated against him and marginalized his position because of his beliefs. He claimed that because of “viewpoint discrimination,” his colleagues have urged him to leave, reduced his class size, forbidden him from participating in policy committees, banned his textbook, denied him opportunities to lecture or instruct students, and marginalized his status at the university.

Oller is not only a creationist, whose articles are posted at the Institute for Creation Research and Answers in Genesis (see links in our first post on this case: Louisiana Creationist Professor Sues University), but he also seems to be an anti-vaxer. Here’s a link to the complaint Oller filed. It’s quite a tale of woe.

His federal suit was dismissed, his appeal was unsuccessful, and his petition for a re-hearing by the appellate court was denied. However, he has also filed a state court case alleging the same grievances. That case is still pending, although it gets no attention from the press. The only support he has received is from ol’ Hambo — see Ken Ham Supports John Oller’s Lawsuit. The Discovery Institute, self-described champions of what they consider to be academic freedom, haven’t said a word about Oller’s lonely struggle.

When we last wrote about this case, we said that unless Oller is trying to get the US Supreme Court interested in his federal case, it’s over — except for his ongoing state court litigation, about which there is no news. But we have just learned of a new federal development from one of our operatives, whose code name is Deep Trachea.

What’s the news? We won’t keep you waiting. Oller has petitioned the US Supreme Court to hear his thrice-dismissed federal case. Here’s a link to the court’s docket. His petition was filed on 13 August, and the defendants’ response was filed on 14 September — four days ago.

We can’t find those documents, but they’re not important. In all likelihood the court will deny Oller’s petition. When that happens, all that will remain is his state court case. As we learn of new developments, we’ll keep you informed.

In conclusion, we must say that we’re shocked — shocked! — that the Discoveroids aren’t supporting Oller. A creationist anti-vaxer just can’t get any respect these days.

Addendum: Our clandestine operative, Deep Trachea, has given us some of information about Oller’s state court case. The defendants have obtained a summary judgment in their favor on one of the claims (which Oller is appealing), and more of the same is expected on his other claims. Some of the pleadings in the state case (but nothing recent) can be seen here at the Justicia website.

Update: We checked the Supreme Court Docket. Oller’s petition was denied on 19 October 2015, so the federal case is finished.

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5 responses to “John Oller Petitions the US Supreme Court

  1. Kent Hovind ran his 2006 case all the way up to the Supreme Court as well; only to be denied.

    Maybe after Oller is denied he can join with Kent who, as late as this morning, said he was still fighting his 2006 conviction.

    When Kent says that these days I think he is meaning he is working on organizing a Common Law Court of Record which is guaranteed to exonerate him and award him millions in damages.

    I think Kent is planning to have those proceedings take place a the local Pensacola Denny’s.

    Oller might want to contact Kent about getting his own case on that Common Law Court of Record docket.

  2. We just made an addendum to the post. Our clandestine operative, Deep Trachea, has given us some of information about Oller’s state court case. The defendants have obtained a summary judgment in their favor on one of the claims (which Oller is appealing), and more of the same is expected on his other claims. None of the pleadings are available online, at least not yet.

  3. Re Kent Hovind: he has also been involved, albeit reluctantly, with flat-earthers, who have tried–unsuccessfully–to get his endorsement for their ideas and are hacked off at him for refusing to do it.

    Frankly, I can’t see why Doctor Doofus has a problem with the flat earth. After all, it’s supported by the Bible just as Creation is.

    No, never mind, I know why: it’s financial. There are (shudder) tens of millions in the U.S. who swallow the Biblical creation story whole, but I’d be surprised if there were tens of thousands who do the same for the flat earth. There’s a lot less money to be made from bilking flat-earthers.

  4. Eric Lipps:
    “Frankly, I can’t see why Doctor Doofus has a problem with the flat earth. After all, it’s supported by the Bible just as Creation is.”

    Another thing, besides the financial angle you mentioned —
    KJV is very explicit about creation, Adam & Eve, and all that, but its support for a flat earth is merely implied in the wording.

    Maybe this is because by the time the KJV was written, it was already known the earth is round?

  5. @retiredsciguy & @Eric Lipps:
    While the Bible is insistent on creation, it is silent on evolution.
    Evolution is about populations, about taxons, about heritable traits, and there simply no vocabulary in Biblical Hebrew to express any opinion on such subjects. Evolution denial (creationism) is an anachronism in the Ancient Near East.
    Traditional Christian theology says that individuals are created. But, even at that, it says nothing about the process of reproduction. So most Christians are comfortable with reproductive biology. Why they are not equally comfortable with evolutionary biology ought to be a puzzle.

    IMHO, the only flat-Earthers that are left today are isolated individuals, and the only groups are not serious. And Christian theology has long ago come to grips with the shape of the Earth. Of course, the Bible reflects the standard cosmology of the Ancient Near East, but nobody believes in the solid dome – the firmament – and the rest.

    More appropriate IMHO is to compare and contrast evolution-denial with geocentrism. There are vocal proponents of geocentrism, and the Bible has been traditionally – for something like 2000 years – taken as stating geocentrism.