Georgia Purdom on Extraterrestrial Life

Are you one of those people who wonders about extraterrestrial life? If so, you should stop wasting your time. That’s the word from sweet Georgia Purdom. She knows what she’s talking about, because she’s one of the creation scientists at Answers in Genesis (AIG) — the creationist ministry of Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo). Our last post about her was Georgia Purdom Proves Adam & Eve.

Sweet Georgia has written Did Life Come from Outer Space? Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

The simple answer is NO! The Bible states that God created all living things on earth by His spoken word on Days Three, Five, and Six of the creation week.

Well, that’s it. But there are scoundrels out there who refuse to accept The Truth Therefore, sweet Georgia explains their heresies and deftly rebuts them:

However, the concept that life originated in outer space and was then transferred to earth is popular in today’s society. Some believe that bacteria (considered “primitive” life) or organic molecules necessary for life came from other planets, meteors, or comets. Some even suggest that intelligent extraterrestrial aliens sent life to earth. Many people are eager to believe in any ideas concerning the origin of life as long as they exclude the Creator God and the truth of His Word.

The fools! Let’s read on:

Why do scientists want to push the origin of life into outer space rather than believe that life originated on earth? The answer: complexity and time.

She devotes a few paragraphs to telling us how complex even the simplest living things are. Then:

According to secular timelines, the earth is 4.5 billion years old. Other parts of outer space are much older (up to 15 billion years old according to big bang models). Since evolution works by random chance and even the simplest bacteria isn’t very simple, a lot of time would be required for life to evolve. Many secular scientists suggest the earth is simply not old enough to allow for the evolution of living organisms. Thus, many scientists push the origin of life into outer space to gain the time needed for life to evolve.

We haven’t seen any biologist make that argument before. Sweet Georgia continues:

If life came to earth from outer space, then many scientists suggest that we should be able to find evidence for living things on nearby planets, meteors, and comets. Although billions of dollars have been spent in the search for extraterrestrial life, none has been found.

A tragic waste! She informs her readers that no life has yet been found on Mars or the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, and then says:

Life has not yet been found in outer space and it is unlikely to exist because conditions appear too hostile for even the hardiest forms of life to exist. Even if the ingredients necessary for life (organic molecules like amino acids) were transported to earth and added to water and an energy source, life would not miraculously emerge. Life only comes from life, and life only from the Life-Giver.

Got that? Life only comes from the Life-Giver. Isn’t Georgia wonderful? Then she discusses a related concept:

The concept that aliens brought life to earth is called directed panspermia. The term was first coined by the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, Francis Crick, and Leslie Orgel in 1973. They postulated that since earth is relatively young compared to the rest of the universe that it was conceivable that a technologically advanced society in outer space developed even before earth existed (since it only took 4.5 billions years for a technological society to form on earth). Crick and Orgel believe that this alien society then seeded or “infected” other parts of outer space including earth with primitive forms of life (like bacteria).

[…]

One of their main evidences to support this possibility comes from the similarity of the genetic code in all living things. They stated, “The universality of the genetic code follows naturally from an ‘infective’ theory of the origins of life. Life on earth would represent a clone derived from a single extraterrestrial organism.”

Sweet Georgia easily dismisses that one:

When we begin with God’s Word we see that the universality of the genetic code follows naturally from a common Designer who created all living things by His Word.

Near the end of her brilliant essay, she asks a profound question:

Could God Have Created Life on Planets Other than Earth?

This is her answer:

Yes, but why? Remember that God spent the vast majority of the creation week preparing the earth for the crowning glory of His creation — man. Everything God created was for man’s benefit and enjoyment. Even those things which we don’t often consider, like bacteria, were created to benefit man. … Although we can’t rule out that some form of non-intelligent life, such as bacteria, was created on another planet, it seems unlikely knowing the purposes of living organisms and their relationship to man on earth set forth by the Creator God.

So let the secularists, the atheists, the evolutionists, and the rest of them speculate about life beyond the Earth. Creationists know — they know! — that it’s all a bunch of nonsense. And now, dear reader, you know it too.

Copyright © 2015. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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19 responses to “Georgia Purdom on Extraterrestrial Life

  1. It may have taken as much as a billion years for life to arise on earth, and roughly three billion more years to become multicellular. Georgia would have us believe that 4.5 billion years isn’t enough time to evolve the world we see around us, so it must have been done in six days by an invisible spirit.

    Got it.

  2. The Bible states that God created all living things on earth by His spoken word on Days Three, Five, and Six of the creation week.

    Does the Bible say that you and I were created during creation week? You and I, rather than our ancestors, rather than “mankind”?

    Does the Bible say that the winner of the Kentucky Derby in 2050 was created during creation week? How about this year’s corn (maize) crop? Or just your puppy Fido, which was born a few months ago?

    Does the Bible say microbes were created during creation week? On what day were malaria parasites, athlete’s foot fungi, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus created?

  3. Remember that God spent the vast majority of the creation week preparing the earth for the crowning glory of His creation — man.

    Yes, god was busy toiling away in his little workshop prepping the earth for us. Took him a long time to make everything, lots of detail work and it had to be just right. Maybe that’s the reason the old geezer had to rest on day 7, he was all tuckered out.

  4. Pete Moulton

    Ed: “…so it must have been done in six days by an invisible spirit.”

    An invisible spirit for whose existence no religion in the history of ever has been able to provide even a single scintilla of objective evidence

  5. Sweet Georgia opines: “Many people are eager to believe in any ideas concerning the origin of life as long as they exclude the Creator God and the truth of His Word”. Obviously she’s not talking about scientists, for scientists are only interested in ideas about the origin of life that are supported by data. As far as I know, there’s absolutely no data related to Sweet Georgia’s favorite bronze age myth. And she’d alleged to be a “scientist”? Oh, I see she’s a “creation scientist”. That explains it. The absence of data about their bronze age myths apparently doesn’t bother creation scientists at all.

  6. @DavidK
    And how much time was spent on preparing the vast majority of the universe? As far as I can tell, that must be day 4, when he placed the Sun, Moon and stars on the firmament so that they could mark the passage of time. Not any indication of attention to features of the planets, formation of galaxies, etc.
    And where is there any indication anywhere in the Bible about the design of matter and energy, gravitation, electromagnetism, space-time?

    @Pete Moulton
    And no one has hinted what mechanisms anything supernatural uses, what rules it follows, in interacting with the natural world. What sort of evidence could we imagine would be relevant if we don’t know what it’s evidence for?

  7. I don’t know why the Creationazis are so frightened at the prospect of the discovery of alien life. (I also don’t understand why they keep making definitive statements like this when they must *know* that, should alien life be discovered in the near future, as is not impossible, all their stern but falsified declarations will undermine their own cause.) If the Great Almighty chose to create life on one planet, why not on all of them? Or lots of them, anyway. In fact, if I were Purdom, I’d be confronting the argument that, since the solar system’s planets seem mainly inhospitable to life, this would suggest the nonexistence of God.

  8. Sweet Georgia Creates a figure rectally:
    ” Although billions of dollars have been spent in the search for extraterrestrial life…”

    Billions of dollars? I highly doubt it. Most SETI programs have been conducted on a shoestring with second-hand facilities built mostly for other purposes. But then, of course she created the figure. After all, she’s a creationist, right?

  9. @retiredsciguy

    Billions of dollars? I highly doubt it. Most SETI programs have been conducted on a shoestring with second-hand facilities built mostly for other purposes.

    Initially I had this problem too. But, the more I thought about it, the more I realized you could chuck in chunks of the Kepler Budget and chunks of the budget for various Mars explorations, and . . . All told, this is one of those cases in which Purdom is (quite by accident) correct. The total probably does add up to billions.

  10. Mike Elzinga

    All told, this is one of those cases in which Purdom is (quite by accident) correct. The total probably does add up to billions.

    Yeah; such a waste of money that could have been spent on approximately another week of war in Iraq.

    Purdom is the one who thinks we have diseases because some bacteria turned to the Dark Side after the Fall.

  11. When we begin with God’s Word we see that the universality of the genetic code follows naturally from a common Designer who created all living things by His Word.

    God’s Word and his countless army of unnamed and very human ghost writers that have been hammering out the pages of this prose for the past three thousand years or more. For a document so revered by creationists it’s amazing how little scholarly research they actually do into the origins of this Bronze Age tripe.

    Why? They don’t want to think, they just want to be told and reassured by Hambo that it will all turn out well. Damn, they are going to be disappointed.

  12. @Bert Younger-
    Yes.
    And where in God’s Word do we find an indication of the universality comprising plants and animals, let alone bacteria, archaea and even the same (mostly) genetic code for viruses?
    And where is the sign of the common Designer who also created non-living things? And even non-material things? What is similar between stars and fish, let alone between molecules and angels?

  13. However, the concept that life originated in outer space and was then transferred to earth is popular in today’s society.

    Not that popular. It’s an eccentric speculation taken seriously by only a tiny minority of scientists and barely known at all by laymen.

    Why do scientists want to push the origin of life into outer space rather than believe that life originated on earth?

    See above.

    Although billions of dollars have been spent in the search for extraterrestrial life, none has been found.

    Therefore, of course, none ever will be. Yawn. . . .

    The concept that aliens brought life to earth is called directed panspermia.

    And is, like undirected panspermia, pure speculation embraced by almost nobody except a few ancient-astronauts cultists.

    Many people are eager to believe in any ideas concerning the origin of life as long as they exclude the Creator God and the truth of His Word.

    And here we come to the core of the matter: Ms. Purdom is one of those who think that “if it ain’t in the Bible, it ain’t true.” So much for “scientific” support for creation.

  14. @Eric Lipps-
    And a trouble with believing “if it ain’t in the Bible, it ain’t true” is that there are a lot of things that they want to believe that aren’t in the Bible. As well as enough things in the Bible that they don’t want to believe.

  15. @Eric Lipps

    Not that popular. It’s an eccentric speculation taken seriously by only a tiny minority of scientists and barely known at all by laymen.

    It was discussed really quite extensively — surprisingly extensively, in fact — in the final episode of the Tyson version of Cosmos so it may be a bit better known to laymen than you think. Hm. Come to think of it, this may be where Purdom’s got the idea that it’s mainstream science. Nice to think that AiG’s scientists might be doing their basic research using popular TV shows.

  16. @realthog: Yeah, you’re right. The search for extraterrestrial life, if you include Mars missions, etc. is certainly in the billions.

    I mistakenly was thinking of the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Of course, Sweet Georgia undoubtedly thinks ANY money spent on either topic is money that should be going to help Ham build his Ark Park.

  17. It is unlikely that more than a billion has been spent looking for aliens, but you can’t include the programs mentioned here. Kepler is looking for extrasolar planets, not specifically life. It may be possible to find an Earth like planet based on star distance, mass etc. but this isn’t Kepler’s mission it is just looking for planets in a small piece of the sky. No Mars mission since Viking has had an exobiology experiment, which was only one small experiment. All missions have mostly focused on water and evidence of water–this is not specifically for life. SETI has a shoestring budget and has had to seek private funding because of ridicule over “little green men” from a scientifically illiterate congress.
    Georgia is wrong that scientists ” WANT to push the origin of life into outer space”. Scientists do want to explore the possibility which is possible though unlikely. We know material is exchanged between Mars and the Earth, and we also know microbes can survive such a trip so it is possible, especially if during the early solar system Mars somehow had a head start on life. If I had to bet I’d bet that life began right here on Earth. If Martian fossils were found it would be possible to discern a Martian origin if the chriality, genetic code, and other chemical factors were the same.

  18. Although billions of dollars have been spent in the search for extraterrestrial life, none has been found.

    Let me recast that sentence in a more relevant light: Although billions of dollars have been spent in the search for god and gods, none has been found. That’s also excluding the cost of the twenty million plus lives lost in religious wars (low estimate) whereas SETI to date has exacted not one to my knowledge

  19. My own personal guess is that there will be found something which is not life as we know it, but also is unlike the inorganic. Something which will get people arguing over a definition of life. And to engage in wild speculation, will get people searching for this sort of chemistry on Earth. Something which we didn’t think of looking for on Earth before finding it somewhere else.