Granville Sewell: Intelligent Design Is So Obvious

The Discovery Institute has posted a new article by Granville Sewell. He’s not a Discoveroid “fellow,” but Wikipedia informs us that he’s a signatory to the Discovery Institute’s “A Scientific Dissent from Darwinism” petition. Sewell is very keen on using the Second Law of Thermodynamics as an argument for creationism — see Discovery Institute Gives Us Their Best Argument.

Our last post about Granville was The Genius of Granville Sewell. His genius is even more apparent in his latest offering at the Discoveroids’ creationist blog: It’s Really Not Rocket Science. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us. He begins by approvingly quoting some article by Jay Homnick which says:

Once you allow the intellect to consider that an elaborate organism with trillions of microscopic interactive components can be an accident… you have essentially “lost your mind.”

With that setting the tone, Granville tells us:

It has never required a PhD in science to understand the key issue in the debate between Darwinism and intelligent design. It is blindingly obvious to non-scientists like Jay Homnick that unintelligent forces alone cannot design hearts, eyes, ears, and brains. Darwinists dismiss the layman’s intuition that there is something terribly “unnatural” about evolution, and claim that while it may seem implausible to the uneducated, there is no scientific principle that prevents the basic, unintelligent, forces of physics alone from reorganizing the basic particles of physics into computers and science texts and jet airplanes.

Aaaargh!! Granville invokes the Junkyard tornado canard. Let’s read on:

But there is such a principle, and the layman understands it perfectly well: unintelligent forces cannot do intelligent things. And in recent years, a number of people have attempted to take this simple layman’s principle and state it in more precise, scientific terms.

Then he quotes from such Discoveroid luminaries as William Dembski, who, Granville reminds us, “points out that the origin and evolution of life involved the creation of many things that are complex and specified.” [*Begin Drool Mode*] Ooooooooooooh! [*End Drool Mode*] See Specified complexity.

After that, Granville babbles about the second law of thermodynamics, and declares:

What could be a more spectacular violation of this law than atoms on a rocky, barren planet spontaneously reorganizing themselves into computers and airplanes and encyclopedias?

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! Granville continues:

The fact that order can increase in an open system does not mean that because tornados derive their energy from the sun, they might occasionally turn rubble into houses and cars, and it does not mean that computers can appear on a barren planet as long as the planet receives solar energy; something must be entering our open system that makes the appearance of computers not extremely improbable, for example: computers.

You know what’s coming next, don’t you? After lovingly quoting an article he wrote, which appeared in the Discoveroids’ own vanity journal, BIO-Complexity, he starts babbling about “information”:

The argument from information is now widely used by ID proponents to argue that the vast amounts of information in living things (in DNA, for example) cannot be accounted for by unintelligent causes.

[*Begin Drool Mode*] Ooooooooooooh! [*End Drool Mode*] For our discussion of Discoveroid “information” see Phlogiston, Vitalism, and Information. Here’s more from Granville:

So the three arguments above are actually all just variations on the same common-sense theme, and each just attempts to state in more scientific, precise, terms what is completely obvious to the unindoctrinated, that unintelligent forces cannot do intelligent things, such as design hearts, eyes, ears, and brains.

Seeing design in living things is not at all difficult, it’s really not rocket science. You don’t need an intimate knowledge of microbiology, or of the details of evolutionary theory, or even of the concept of irreducible complexity.

Granville is right — even an idiot can see it. And now we come to the end:

No matter how many other mysteries of Nature may yield to scientific investigation, and no matter how much evidence for common descent we may find … [o]nce you seriously consider the possibility that all the magnificent species in the living world, and the human body and the human brain, could be entirely the products of unintelligent forces, you have been in academia too long and have lost contact with reality — you have lost your mind.

Well, dear reader, it’s clear that someone has lost his mind. Is it Granville, or is it you?

Copyright © 2015. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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21 responses to “Granville Sewell: Intelligent Design Is So Obvious

  1. ….each just attempts to state in more scientific, precise, terms…

    I would love for the DI to provide us with a scientific, precise, definition of “Information”.

  2. “You don’t need an intimate knowledge of microbiology” (to detect I.D.).

    Of course you don’t, the less knowledge the observer has, the more obvious the oogity-boogity will be.

    Is it unfair to expect someone with a Ph.D to be able to produce an argument that is at least to some degree nuanced? May be it’s the M.S. in engineering that caused the frontal lobe collapse.

  3. Holding The Line In Florida

    Ok, I know I left my mind somewhere. Now if I can find it……

  4. [W]hat is completely obvious to the unindoctrinated, that unintelligent forces cannot do intelligent things – like write a coherent op-ed for the DI website…

    On the other hand, natural selection is a perfectly good designer. The requirements are simple – variation, heritability, and fitness differences.

  5. It seems Granville is aware that using the ‘brain surgery’ analogy no longer works.

  6. “Darwinists dismiss the layman’s intuition …”

    How has that layman’s intuition worked out in the rest of science? Relativity? Yeah, that was pretty obvious to everyone. QM? Hell, everybody understands that! Well, except for Feynman maybe. And don’t even get me started on engineering. What a waste of time. Why I’ve built two woodsheds with no engineer’s degree, and they’re still standing after 20 years. I bet I could have saved a bundle on that new bridge just down the road. Looks all wrong to me.

    Why do I get the feeling this guy looks like Alfred E. Neuman?

  7. It’s Really Not Rocket Science

    FTFY.

  8. “But there is such a principle, and the layman understands it perfectly well: unintelligent forces cannot do intelligent things.”

    I submit that Granville Sewell himself is proof positive regarding his stated assertion.

  9. Granville Sewell:
    “It has never required a PhD in science to understand the key issue in the debate between Darwinism and intelligent design.”

    “Intelligent Design — a simple idea for simple minds.”

  10. All the commentators above I believe would hold to the tenet that design may not necessarily have to be intelligent. While I am not yet convinced of this point, the comments above certainly go along way in proving it. All your replies were designed; the vast majority lacked intelligence.

  11. How so Boon? Compared to Granville’s?

  12. Boon, please help us understand just how crazy you are. Are you a young earth or old earth creationist? Does your intelligent designer wave a magic wand, or does it just mumble “Oogity Boogity”?

  13. Darwinists dismiss the layman’s intuition that there is something terribly “unnatural” about evolution, and claim that while it may seem implausible to the uneducated, there is no scientific principle that prevents the basic, unintelligent, forces of physics alone from reorganizing the basic particles of physics into computers and science texts and jet airplanes.

    Heretics may dismiss the layman’s intuition that there is something terribly “unnatural” about the idea that the earth is round and orbits the sun, rather than flat and at the center of the universe . . . Need I go on?

  14. Granville’s “layman’s intuition” is that there is something “unnatural” about evolution. Therefore, he chooses to believe in something else even more unnatural. So unnatural that it does not, in fact, exist in the natural world.

    He’s right about one thing. ID has nothing to do with “rocket science.” In rocket science, the intelligent designers actually exist, and one can have a beer or two with them.

  15. Ask any kids who have been to the zoo whether monkeys are like us, and particularly like their siblings.
    Ask whether heavy objects fall faster than light ones.
    My guess is that kids have an intuition more in line with common descent than with classical mechanics.

  16. Charles Deetz ;)

    I find it equally improbable (via my intuition) that a Designer figured out how to build an “elaborate organism with trillions of microscopic interactive components”. That is a lot of detail work, and in observational science seems to self-manage and self-replicate (without divine assistance). Multiply that by tens of thousands of species, and their functionality within the environment.

    On top of that, using my intuition, I can’t imagine where the Designer inserted his designs. Did he just keep copy-and-pasting-and-editing DNA over and over until all the animals and plants were created?

  17. “The argument from information is now widely used”
    I applaud the honest language here. Exactly – “argument”. That’s what IDiocy is about. Science at the other hand is about testing hypotheses by comparing them with empirical evidence.

  18. Granville gives us a nice capsule of ID.

    1) Argument from intuition.
    2) Argument from inapt analogy.
    3) Argument from inapt analogy.

    Told by an IDiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.

  19. I think his frustration of getting absolutely no recognition from anyone in the scientific community is finally getting to him.

  20. @Reflectory:
    Five stars!
    The Shakespeare quote is perfectly apt.

  21. Has someone lost their mind? Is is Granville or me? My mind is right where it always has been, right between my ears. Must be Granville.