Another Creationist Preacher & Camera Story

We shouldn’t be so gleeful when we find news stories like this, but we can’t help it. In the New York Post, founded by Alexander Hamilton, we found this headline: Pastor caught stealing from collection basket on hidden camera: police. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

A crooked cleric was caught stealing from the collection basket of his tiny Upper East Side church — by suspicious congregants who secretly set up a video camera, cops said Thursday.

Ironic, isn’t it? In this case we have a fallen preacher and a hidden camera — but the camera was being used for good, not evil. On with the story:

The Rev. Daniel Iampaglia — who is embroiled in a bitter court battle for control of the evangelical Rock Church — was busted for allegedly swiping about $238 in “worship money” over two months. He is also accused in court papers of misappropriating more than $8,000 in church funds.

Gasp! How is it possible for a man of God to do such a thing? Here’s the website for the Rock Church, where Iampaglia does his preaching. The “What We Believe” section of their “About Us” page doesn’t get specific about evolution, but it says:

We believe in the verbal inspiration and inerrancy of the Scriptures and the authority of both the Old and New Testaments.

From that we assume they’re creationists, which means that rev Iampaglia is yet another creationist preacher who has somehow gone astray. The New York Post continues:

Cops were called to the church two days before Thanksgiving to break up an argument between Iampaglia and Joseph McGee, who is one of several congregants suing to oust the holy roller. McGee handed over video that repeatedly shows Iampaglia counting cash inside a church office, then folding some of the bills and stuffing them into his pocket, police sources said.

[…]

According to a related affidavit that McGee filed in Manhattan Supreme Court this week, a review of church records has revealed that “in excess of $8,000 have been misappropriated or used without …. approval” over the past two years.

Your Curmudgeon is shocked — shocked! Here’s one more excerpt from the New York Post story:

Iampaglia refused to comment and swung his cane at a photographer during a Thursday afternoon walk to a corner grocery store for an apple pie and a tub of Neapolitan ice cream.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! He swung his cane at a photographer, and then calmly went for apple pie. Have you ever heard of a scientist who behaved like that? Verily, creationism does strange things to its followers.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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7 responses to “Another Creationist Preacher & Camera Story

  1. What’s wrong with taking a swing at a photographer. He was just raising a little cane, as it were. Ha! Ha! Sorry, I just had to make a bad pun to start the new year. Maybe the Rev believed that we should do unto others as we would have them do unto us, but just do it first. Or if he thinks it’s his church, then it’s his money, etc.

  2. It’s a virus that slowly spreads throughout church communities. There doesn’t seem to be any vaccine for it, and like pedophilia and other deviant behavior, will be a permanent fixture in the holey (sic) realm.

  3. Another entry for the “Freedom From Religion Foundation” news column called “Black Collar Crime”. Check it out if you are unfamiliar with it.

  4. I don’t understand this. He is the preacher, yes? He took money that was given to him? Where is the wrong?? That’s his job, to beg for money no one can spare and then spend it on stuff and then lie about it going to help others.

  5. “Have you ever heard of a scientist who behaved like that? ”
    I have heard of some scientists behaving far worse.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsche_Physik

    One of them won the frigging Noble Price:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Stark

  6. Well mnbo there is a big difference between a scientist being ruled by his dogma into doing nasty things (no different then many religions) and a scientists turning his science into dogma. What little of this happens is soon pushed down the toilet. ie science shows blacks are inferior or homeopathy is good & except for a few fanatics both of these were science dogma but has been pushed down the toilet.
    But also more to the point scientist can behave badly about stuff, and they don’t go around telling everyone they are morally superior and everyone else is going to hell.

  7. Dave Luckett

    To be fair, neither do Christians who have absorbed the actual tenets of their religion: “All are sinners, all are unworthy of the grace of God.” You know that annoying bumper sticker “Christians aren’t perfect, just forgiven”. To which I always growl, “I haven’t forgiven the buggers”. Well, I haven’t forgiven them for what they actually have done, and still do. But forgiveness is not required for acts they actually haven’t done.

    Universal sinfulness is actually what all sects, denominations, and branches of Christianity teach. They all deny the possibility of justification by virtue. Remember Jesus’s story about the Pharisee who thanked God that he was without fault, and then the “publican” begged God to forgive him for being a sinner? Which one, asked Jesus, was justified? And the answer was the publican.

    So the Christian churches don’t teach that Christians are “morally superior”. Most of them don’t teach that everyone else is going to hell, either. Ever heard of the Catholic doctrine of the just pagan? It’s based on Jesus’s parable of the Good Samaritan. Protestantism and Orthodoxy generally teach the same. It’s only the loony holy rollers on the far fringe who have so far forgotten that humility is a virtue.

    Look, I’m an atheist, same as many here – but I was brought up Presbyterian. I don’t like a lot of things that organised Christianity does, and I really, really don’t like the doctrine of eternal damnation. If it were true, it would mean that God’s a monster. I don’t think that there’s a god at all, but I know for sure that even if I did, I couldn’t worship something like that.

    But all the same, there’s no point in lambasting the Christian churches for stuff they don’t do and don’t think. There’s plenty of scope for lambasting them for what they do.