Self-Published Genius #41: Logical Proof of God

It’s time for another addition to our series about Self-Published Geniuses, where we bring you news of authors with a vanity press book in which the author claims to have made paradigm-shattering discoveries, and announces his work by hiring a press release service.

This author’s press release is titled How Do We Know That God Exists? It was issued by PRWeb, which “gets your news straight to the search engines that everyone uses, like Google, Yahoo and Bing.”

In addition to the press release, we need more to confirm that the book qualifies for our collection. Was it published by a vanity press? Oh yeah! Although the press release doesn’t disclose that information, we learned at Amazon that the publisher is something called iUniverse. Their website proudly announces: “Our self-publishing book packages offer various combinations of our publishing, editorial, and marketing services for a truly customized self-publishing experience.”

Okay — we’ve got a vanity press book and we’ve got the author’s press release. Let’s find out what it says, with some bold font added by us for emphasis:

As a former professor of mathematics, Ralph Carlson has spent considerable time working with students to help them develop logically correct arguments in constructing proof. After attending a conference that discussed creationism, intelligent design, and evolution – Carlson felt challenged to dig deeper into these same approaches just as he encourages his own students to use logic to find the truth of mathematical arguments.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! He attended a creationism conference, and that’s where he was inspired to write this book. Let’s read on:

In Carlson’s new book “Truth and Consequences,” he transforms the question of God’s existence and related questions into propositions. “Instead of attempting to answer the questions concerning God’s existence, I approach everything with statements that are either true of false. There is no middle ground,” Carlson said.

What a brilliant approach! But wait — there’s more:

Along with encouraging his readers to answer tough questions, Carlson also challenges the theory of evolution and it’s logic over billions of years.

[*Begin Drool Mode*] Ooooooooooooh — what a book! [*End Drool Mode*] The press release continues:

“Evolutionists claim that all life on earth has evolved from simple forms of life over thousands of years and that this claim has been proven to be a scientific fact. However, this is a logical error in their so-called proof,” Carlson said.

That must have been quite a creationism conference he attended. Here’s the rest of the press release:

Is God trying to speak to America? Does God exist? What is the source of life on earth? Read “Truth and Consequences” and find out.

You’ve got to be wondering — who is this brilliant author? At the bottom of the press release we learn:

Dr. Ralph Carlson graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a doctorate degree in mathematics. Carlson is now a retired professor from Grove City College and has published over 25 articles on mathematics in a variety of scholarly journals. … Carlson currently resides in Pennsylvania and enjoys spending time with his wife, children, and golfing.

And here’s the Amazon listing for his book: Truth and Consequences. It’s an impressive 108 pages long and costs only $12.95 in paperback. What a bargain! Well, dear reader — what are you waiting for?

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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18 responses to “Self-Published Genius #41: Logical Proof of God

  1. Christine Janis

    There’s but a single review of the book, and it appears to be by the author himself.

  2. Christine Janis says: “There’s but a single review of the book, and it appears to be by the author himself.”

    Self-published, self-reviewed. Very logical.

  3. I’d be a tad more impressed — but only a tad — if he took the trouble to proofread his press release.

  4. @Christine Janis

    Yet more alarmingly, he’s a verified purchaser of the book.

  5. What does the review “Showed evolutionist ‘proof’ the evolution is a scientific fact has a logical error” actually mean?

  6. michaelfugate

    Of course Grove City College is Christian, but they do teach an “evolutionary biology” course:

    BIOL 326. EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY. (Group 3) The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the theory of evolution, from the production and maintenance of genetic variation to the formation of new species, to present a summary of the history of life on earth, to familiarize students with the mechanisms of evolution, and the concepts of speciation and of major innovations. The material explanation for the origins of life and biological diversification will be examined in light of the Biblical doctrine of God’s sovereignty in creation and process.

    All 9 biology faculty went to religious undergraduate institutions – most to Grove City.

  7. Sorry Not-so-smart but all your illogic, BS philosophy, and BS arguments mean absolutely NOTHING!!! Show me the EVIDENCE!!!! All you are doing is slinging words.

  8. Carson asks “Is God trying to speak to America?” One would think that if some all powerful sky fairy were trying to speak to America, he/she/it could have found a way to do it by now. IT specialists from various countries can break into nearly any computer network at will, and so can many independent teen-age geeks. None of them, as far as I know, is all powerful. Doesn’t Carson’s sky fairy have a robust understanding of modern communication networks?

  9. abeastwood says: “One would think that if some all powerful sky fairy were trying to speak to America, he/she/it could have found a way to do it by now.”

    There are a few blogs out there with names like God’s Blog.

  10. Please take pity on my ignorance. It would appear that the title “professor” means something different in America to the meaning I understand.

    Here, it means “one who holds an endowed professorial chair in a University recognised by the Federal Department of Education”, which does NOT mean a seminary, college, technical institute, trade school or any such tertiary education or training institution. It does not mean instructor, lecturer, reader, tutor or course head, nor even “head of school” unless that person holds a professorial chair. Typically, there is only one professor in a school of study in a University, and there may only be one per faculty. There are now said to be such things as associate professors and assistant professors, but these are not the same, and it would be a falsehood for persons holding those offices to claim to be a professor without qualification.

    What does “professor” mean in the US?

    I can only also remark that a total of about 25 papers in journals for an entire academic career is miserable. I wonder what their citation rate and impact is?

    And the plainly obvious fact that a proper academic publisher wouldn’t touch this makes it clear to me that it’s nonsense.

  11. In the USA, there is no official recognition on the federal level of universities. There are endowed professorial chairs, but there may be several of them in the same field of study at the same institution. There are, beyond associate professors and assistant professors, also visiting professors, adjunct professors, research professors, clinical professors and professors emeriti, of widely different status. There is a Wikipedia article on “Academic ranks in the United States”, if one wants an outline of the confusing topic.
    Perhaps the only recognition of high status, at the national level, is membership in one of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, but it is rare (never) to refer to mark that distinction in the USA by the title “Academician” – rather “academcian” is a vague word covering post-doctorates and even graduate students.

  12. As soon as the math prof understands the logical error in “an immaterial entity called god interacts with our material reality” I might take him seriously.

  13. Ceteris Paribus

    Carlson asserts:

    “Instead of attempting to answer the questions concerning God’s existence, I approach everything with statements that are either true of [sic] false. There is no middle ground”

    One suspects that Carlson does not understand that his demand for “no middle ground” runs into a logical brick wall in the commonly heard Christian statement that “you must die in order to have eternal life”.

  14. You’ve got to be wondering — who is this brilliant author? At the bottom of the press release we learn:

    Dr. Ralph Carlson graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a doctorate degree in mathematics. Carlson is now a retired professor from Grove City College and has published over 25 articles on mathematics in a variety of scholarly journals. … Carlson currently resides in Pennsylvania and enjoys spending time with his wife, children, and golfing.

    It would help if even one of those “scholarly journals” were actually named.

  15. @Dave Luckett

    I too find the US use of the term “professor” confusing; even more confusing is that US editors seem rarely to know that the term has a different meaning elsewhere.

    So far as I can understand it, and I may be wrong, the US equivalent of “Professor” is “Chair.” Of course, you wouldn’t normally call a person “Chair Smith,” or whatever, but . . .

  16. I just got to wondering how many publications Kurt Godel produced. Not many, I know.
    Don’t take this as being at all relevant to this topic.

  17. “Chair” can refer to the chairman/chairwoman/chairperson/chair of a department. This is a totally administrative position, and in many departments it is rotated among all of the tenured faculty, as it is considered a burden, taking away time from productive work. Sometimes, it is sought after as a position of power. It is not a permanent position. There is only one chair in each administrative department.
    One can refer to Smith as the chair of mathematics, but not “Chair Smith”.

    “Chair” can also refer to an “endowed chair”, named after a person or persons who gave the endowment, or after someone that they want to honor – “The Smith Family Chair of Economics” or “The Abraham Lincoln Chair of History”. One can refer to “Smith, the Lincoln Chair of History”, but not “Chair Smith”. This is a prestigious academic position. There may be several chairs in any discipline. Sometimes it mentions a sub-discipline, like “Chair of Civil War History”. It is a permanent position. If one retires, one retains the title as “Smith, Lincoln Chair Emeritus”.
    And there are more complications, of course.