Discovery Institute’s Thrilling New Enterprise

You probably recall the Discovery Institute’s failed effort (under Casey’s leadership) to establish a nationwide, campus-based anti-science movement they called IDEA Clubs (IDEA = Intelligent Design and Evolution Awareness). Wikipedia still has an article on them, which ends by saying:

As of 2015, the press/media contact lists a San Diego State University email address as its sole contact. The email address denotes assignation to an employee of SDSU, a publicly funded university, which does not have a chapter at its school.

After that catastrophe, we assumed the Discoveroids had learned their lesson. But one of our clandestine operatives, code-named “Gumbo Girl,” brought to our attention the amazing news that the Discoveroids are trying to start another string of creationist clubs — this time called the Science & Culture Network. A more accurate name might be “Anti-Science & Bronze Age Culture Network,” but it’s their network, so they get to name it.

There’s a website for the Discoveroids’ latest grandiose scheme: Science & Culture Network, which says:

Science & Culture Network Chapters are local/regional affiliated groups dedicated to supporting the mission of Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture (CSC) to advance the understanding that life and the universe are the result of intelligent design. If you are interested in the requirements for organizing an official chapter, please contact Janine Dixon the CSC’s Educational Outreach Coordinator [email address].

How many chapters does their “network” have? BWAHAHAHAHAHA! They say that Houston is the only one. But it looks like a good one. Our clandestine operative pointed us to this Discoveroid fund-raising website, which says:

The Houston chapter of the Science & Culture Network (SCN-Houston) has committed to help raise funds for the general needs of the Center for Science and Culture (CSC) at Discovery Institute.

It’s always nice when the kids send home money to support the old folks in their decrepitude. Hey, who is Janine Dixon, their Educational Outreach Coordinator? We’ve never run into her name before. The only time she wrote anything for the Discoveroids’ creationist blog was this recent post: Houston Chapter of the Science & Culture Network Launches BIG with a Screening of Living Waters. It’s about another of their creationist revival meetings.

Janine’s name pops up about a dozen times in a search of the Discoveroids’ blog, but after looking at a few of the hits we got, they’re just references to her as someone to contact. A generation ago, she probably would have been described as a switchboard operator. Oh, wait — she did write something else — back in 2013: Twenty Intelligent Design Resources: A Christmas Shopping List. Somehow that escaped our attention.

Wait — there’s a biographical blurb at the Discoveroids’ website: Janine Dixon, Staff, which informs us:

She has a BA in political science and an emphasis in business, and she has been working in development and outreach at Discovery Institute since 2006. Before coming to Discovery Institute, she worked with the National Association of Evangelicals in Washington, DC.

Hey — that’s great training for a job with the Discoveroids. Well, dear reader, if you want to start your very own chapter so you can be part of the Discoveroids’ great intellectual enterprise — and raise money for them! — you know who to contact. Janine is waiting to hear from you.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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23 responses to “Discovery Institute’s Thrilling New Enterprise

  1. Jeepers, this is thrilling!

    If you start up a chapter of the SCN, do you get a secret decoder ring, a tee-shirt, and an official suitable-for-framing 8×10 glossy certificate to hang on the wall?

  2. “Before coming to Discovery Institute, she worked with the National Association of Evangelicals in Washington, DC.”

    More creationist roots for the DI.

    “Oh, we’re not creationists — we’re a science organization!”

    Sure you are.

  3. “…Science & Culture Network Chapters are local/regional affiliated groups dedicated to supporting the mission of Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture (CSC) to advance the understanding that life and the universe are the result of intelligent design.

    Just read their wedge documents, that’s all there is to this notion. Every time you donate, you’re entitled to a free wedgie.

  4. michaelfugate

    An IDEA club under any other name is still a dumb idea. It is far too specific to attract enough members and ID is too wishy-washy to attract creationists.

  5. I saw that write-up but didn’t tweak that it was a new kind of club, just that they had a screening in Houston, my fair city, drawing 700 nutters. Well, let me tell you something about Houston, buddy! There’s a lot more nutters than that! Yee haw!

  6. One is tempted to point out: Casey’s Clubs are an IDEA whose time has gone…

  7. Poor DI, nothing sadder than a one trick pony who can’t even preform the trick anymore.

  8. Rather than give financial support to these new clubs, the DI expects them to fund-raise and send money back to the mother church. That’s really going to win converts…

    And where is the science in any of this? Culture, yeah, but science?

  9. I recommend they be called “Discovery Institute Plenary Sessions Honoring Incredibly Topical Subjects.”

  10. michaelfugate

    Well if it were Jean Dixon instead of Janine maybe the DI would better at predicting what would work?

  11. Mark – are you from the Midwest? I have used the term that you reference and folks out west seem not to understand🙂

  12. That was good, Mark Germano.

  13. Douglas E, what’s not to understand? 🙂

    (Ans, yes, born and raised.)

  14. Agreed Mark. Sadly many miss the fullest appreciation for the term! We Hoosiers tend to use it a lot🙂

  15. Ed:
    “And where is the science in any of this? Culture, yeah, but science?”

    Their culture is akin to what grows in a petri dish. That’s science-y, isn’t it?

  16. You probably recall the Discovery Institute’s failed effort (under Casey’s leadership) to establish a nationwide, campus-based anti-science movement they called IDEA Clubs (IDEA = Intelligent Design and Evolution Awareness). Wikipedia still has an article on them, which ends by saying:

    As of 2015, the press/media contact lists a San Diego State University email address as its sole contact. The email address denotes assignation to an employee of SDSU, a publicly funded university, which does not have a chapter at its school.

    After that catastrophe, we assumed the Discoveroids had learned their lesson.

    Considering what they are, why assume they’re capable of learning anything at all, let alone willing to do so?

  17. The question is not about the promoters of “intelligent design”, what they are capable of, but what the public are capable of.

  18. Faith Bible Church of The Woodlands is north of Houston. That area, surprisingly, is a hotbed of right-wing, Republican Christian Crazies and they elect the most appalling people into government. The church itself is a non-denominational holy roller entertainment complex and money machine. In other words, ideal for the Disco Tute grifters. Rock on, Garth!

  19. docbill, I live in the area, and you know exactly whereof you speak! Every election cycle, the lawn signs for candidates is a knee-high forest of crazy and stupid. There are many fundy churches in the area, and the Fath Bible Church is one of the worst.

  20. Despite its proximity to a fairly cosmopolitan Houston, this area is an intellectual dead zone and hotbed of arm waiving Zombies for Jeebus.

  21. Strange, Wald, because of all the oil company professionals there, and the new Exxon campus, and rich folks. Of course, there’s crazy rich, too! I’m down in Sugar Land near Tom Delay’s old house, although he might be back in town. I’ve seen him shopping at Kroger, sort of like seeing Emperor Palpatine shopping for frozen pizza. We go for corruption over crazy!

  22. Is Tom back to killing bugs?

  23. He looked pretty deflated when I saw him last. Didn’t even bother to paint his bald spot as he’s done in the past. Yep, it looks as weird as it sounds. Hard to believe that pasty little twerp wielded as much power as he did. The Hammer. Now, he’s more like The Hammered.