Another Monday Night Free Fire Zone

We can’t find much to blog about, so here are a few items that might interest you:

1. You already know that Richard Dawkins has suffered a minor stroke — see Church of England defends prayer tweet for Richard Dawkins after stroke.

2. Arizona is considering a Darwin Day resolution — see Senate committee votes to create day for Charles Darwin. But it’s controversial:

Sen. David Farnsworth, R-Mesa, said he would have supported creating an Arizona Science Day. But this, he said, is quite different. “When I was growing up in Mesa, I was taught in school the evolution theory that my ancestors came from monkeys,” Farnsworth said. “Personally, I was offended by that theory, especially when you consider that I hold a deep-seated belief in creationism.” He said it would be fairer to teach both evolution and creationism, both as theories.

3. The BBC is generating controversy over selecting a creationist to report about sports — see Free Church Moderator defends BBC presenter Dan Walker after Christian views mocked.

That’s all we’ve got. Now we’re open for the discussion of pretty much anything — science, politics, economics, whatever — as long as it’s tasteful and interesting. Banter, babble, bicker, bluster, blubber, blather, blab, blurt, burble, boast — say what you will. But avoid flame-wars and beware of the profanity filters. And now, let the Intellectual Free Fire Zone begin! Have at it, dear reader.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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16 responses to “Another Monday Night Free Fire Zone

  1. As an aside, I’m appalled by how very poorly that article about the creationist tv/radio presenter has been written/edited/proofread. Time was that the Herald was looked up to as a stalwart of good journalism. Clearly the interns have taken over.

  2. When Hitchens was dying, Francis Collins met with him several times. Francis told Hitch that he wanted to pray for him, and Hitch graciously accepted although he was forthright about what he believed about prayer.

  3. Sen. David Farnsworth, R-Mesa, said he would have supported creating an Arizona Science Day. But this, he said, is quite different. “When I was growing up in Mesa, I was taught in school the evolution theory that my ancestors came from monkeys,” Farnsworth said. “Personally, I was offended by that theory, especially when you consider that I hold a deep-seated belief in creationism.” He said it would be fairer to teach both evolution and creationism, both as theories.

    But of course, creationism isn’t a theory, or at least not a scientific theory, because it accepts as evidence only what its adherents believe supports a non-scientific authority, the Bible. Teaching it as a scientific theory on a par with evolution would do a profound disservice to education.

    Moreover, if both were taught, it would be only logical for creationists to demand that their ideas be given preference. After all, if you believe evolution is false, why should you want it given equal time with “the truth?” Creationists who say they do are either kidding themselves or lying.

  4. Sen. David Farnsworth, R-Mesa, said… “When I was growing up in Mesa, I was taught in school the evolution theory that my ancestors came from monkeys. Personally, I was offended by that theory…”

    HE was offended?? Just think how the monkeys felt!!

  5. Aarrgh! Forgot to turn off the italics tag… thanking you in advance, O Great Curmy!

    [*Voice from above*] All is well, my son.

  6. This is not about religion, creationism, or evolution. But I’ve noticed that many people forget to close HTML tags. And, yes, I’ve done that too. But here’s trick I learned when I ran a major web site. Write the tags, both opening and closing, first: <em></em>. Then insert the text you want to have in italic between the tags.

  7. Once again, I see confirmation of my guess that the whole deal is about being physically related to monkeys.
    As if nobody is offended by hearing that they are related to Torquemada. Or that they come from dust. Or that they began as a single cell which developed by naturalistic/materialistic laws. Or that their creator had a reason for making their body most similar, among the vast number of possibilities, to chimps and other apes.

  8. @abeastwood:

    Thanks for the tip!

  9. Some people were (and some still are) also offended about the Earth not being the center of the universe. Fortunately, their discomfort with facts has no measurable effect on reality.
    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2010/09/14/geocentrism-seriously/#.VsLjaMt3G5M

  10. Personally I’m offended indeed that I belong to the same species as say Ol’ Hambo. The idea that my son can fall in love with his daughter or granddaughter makes me shudder, even theoretically speaking.

  11. @Zetopan
    Thanks for that reference to Bad Astronomy on geocentrism. That is the best response I’ve seen to it.

  12. I came across this the other day:

    “Magicians” Prove A Spiritual World Exists

    At first I thought it wasn’t serious. But no, as far as I can tell, there are people who really believe that magicians employ demons to perform their tricks and illusions. And it’s an entire genre on youtube.

  13. Reflectory, I lasted 3 minutes. The droning voice, I couldn’t take it any longer. The comments are, um, oh my, um, I dunno what to say.

  14. Wath I lerned in skool today:

    I’m sure we’ve all frequently come across members of the US Christian Right pointing to Michael Faraday as an example of a great scientist who was also a thoroughly committed Xtian. Today I discovered that he was actually a member of the Sandemanian sect. Knowing precisely zero about the Sandemanians, I hied myself to Wikipedia where I discovered they were the English division of the Scottish Glasite sect. And among their tenets? Why, this: “The accumulation of wealth they held to be unscriptural and improper.”

  15. Paul S,

    Yeah. By no means do I want to subject anyone to that entire dreadful video. I watched maybe 7 or 8 minutes total skipping through it (mainly because I wanted to make sure they were serious). The entire video’s reasoning distilled is: “I don’t know how the magician does his trick or illusion; therefore he has help from demons.” There’s also some standard conspiracy theory tropes. E.g. much ado is made about Houdini’s death being on Halloween.