News of Noah’s Flood from Texas

We learned of this through the tireless efforts of “Blue Grass,” one of our clandestine operatives. The news is so astonishing that we have not yet had time to evaluate it. Nevertheless, it would be wrong for us to hold it back. Your Curmudgeon reports; you decide.

We present to you, dear reader, some excerpts from Tyler man says he found fossils from Noah’s flood, which appears at the website of station KYTX-TV, the CBS affiliate in Tyler, Texas. Their website has a comments section. Okay, here we go, with bold font added by us:

One East Texas man believes he found fossils from Noah’s flood and a self-proclaimed fossil expert says he’s right.

Now you know why we are too overcome with awe to have any thoughts on this. If true, it’s the biggest news of our lifetime! Let’s read on:

“From Noah’s flood to my front yard, how much better can it get,” Wayne Propst said. Propst is stunned. He was helping his aunt lay some dirt outside her home in Tyler when he found this. “What’s really interesting to me is we’re talking about the largest catastrophe known to man, the flood that engulfed the entire world,” Propst said.

Wayne’s reaction is certainly understandable. Then we’re told:

He called up self-proclaimed fossil expert Joe Taylor who confirmed that what Propst found is in fact from the time of Noah’s ark and he says finding those fossils in Tyler is rare. “I’ve never heard of anything about that from over there, I’m surprised he found it there,” Taylor said.

We have no reason to doubt the “self-proclaimed fossil expert,” but we’d like to know how he reached his conclusions. The news story continues:

For days, Wayne and his aunt Sharon have been combing through this dirt with the help of some neighborhood kids. “I just take my toothbrush and work on it until we get it,” Wayne’s aunt Sharon Givan said. And send pictures off to Taylor.

Ah, the “self-proclaimed fossil expert” made his findings after seeing photographs. That sounds like proper procedure. Here’s another quote from Wayne’s aunt:

“To think that like he says that we have something in our yard that dated back to when God destroyed the earth. I mean, how much better could anything be,” Givan said.

The news story ends with a note of journalistic caution:

For the record, we have not independently verified if the rocks are in fact historic.

The TV station’s story also has a video, which we haven’t yet viewed. This news is so stupendous that we have to absorb it slowly. If you, dear reader, have the courage to go all the way and look at the video, please let us know what you think.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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21 responses to “News of Noah’s Flood from Texas

  1. I looked at the video and was shocked, shocked to learn that the clowns are claiming the “fossils” are from “Noah’s flood” without presenting a shred of evidence.

  2. The “fossil expert”is Joe Taylor who runs the Mt. Blanco Fossil Museum.

    Joe has, according to the Wikipedia entry, been a collaborator with Carl Baugh and gained some notoriety as the designer of the lettering on the original Mr. Pibb soda cans.

    What a CV!

  3. Most likely the fossils in question are Eocene (34-56 million years old). Most of Smith County has Eocence rocks at the surface.
    Why someone would take fossils, even common ones like these, to a creationist clown instead of a museum or university paleontology department for information and/or identification is very telling about the level of education of the average American.

    That a television station would cover this the way they did is nothing less than journalistic malpractice.

    That our Curmudgeon would foist this upon us is clear evidence of a sadisric and malevolent nature. 😄😄

  4. Ah yes, remembering those good old days when “God destroyed the earth.” Such happy memories! Bring back the good old days!

  5. Fitting that such a miraculous fossil find should be uncovered in Texas. It should also bolster the candidacy of the creationist Brunner (sic) to the TSBOE, adding weight to her creationist credentials as well as add credence to their changing all the science books to highlight this event. Only one thing missing, fossil footprints of dinosaurs and Noah disembarking from the ark. Oh wait, they’ve already been found elsewhere in Texas, a literal goldmine of fossil treasures from the past.

  6. At first I thought I was reading The Onion, then the sad reality hit me.

  7. Dave Luckett

    Ah, yes, Joe Taylor.

    As I recall, one of the exhibits in Mr Taylor’s Mt Blanco museum is a giant’s femur, certainly human, but a bone that cannot have come from a man less than eight feet tall. If pressed, Mr Taylor will agree that this, er, specimen is a resin model, and will admit that he made it himself from a detailed description of the femur, given in a letter he received from a trusted field researcher, who claimed to have found that very bone.

    Oddly enough, the bone itself and the letter have apparently been lost. Probably it was among the many bones of Adamic humans sent to the Smithsonian by their discoverers, only to have that nest of (pah, ptui!) evilootionists destroy them and then lie about it.

    But enough of that. Here I have a brick made of pure, solid gold…

  8. michaelfugate

    Dave, sort of like the gold plates that the book of Mormon was written on?

  9. Dave Luckett

    Friend, those plates of the angel moron… sorry, I mean Moroni… were never assayed, and we have only the holy witness of the profit… sorry, I mean the prophet… Joseph Smith for their purity, for they were taken up to Heaven. Whereas I have here an attested official assay certificate for the ingot I hold in my hand, and you will observe that it certifies that the ingot – this very ingot I have right here – is composed of pure twenty-four carat solid gold…. don’t crowd me, boy…

  10. Congressman Pete Sessions from Texas recently declared Magic is a “National Treasure” and is trying to pass legislation (H. Res. 642) to make that official. How fitting!

  11. Texas has a great many interesting fossil sites, but I don’t recall ever finding a Noah’s Flood exposure. Technically, one should be able to find a mix of creatures from every time period jumbled up in the flood exposure, so it would be quite a find. I think a deep and expansive excavation should be undertaken immediately – sponsored by Ken Ham. This could be the proof he has longed for. I’m sure Mr. Propst will not mind.

  12. @Ed
    Hydrologic sorting explains the pattern of correlation of geology with fossils. Or something. (And only atheists would bring up thermodynamitism.)

  13. Wait, haven’t the likes of Ken Ham already been telling us that all of those fossils in those atheistic museums are from the Flood? And the order is explained by either, as TomS notes, hydrologic sorting and/or the species’ ability to run from the deluge?

    It’s almost like these creation paleontologists don’t know what they’re talking about.

  14. One of the first surprises that I got in hearing about creationism was that they almost all accept that fossils are the remains of once living living things. Very few take the stance that they are tricks of the devil.

  15. “To think that like he says that we have something in our yard that dated back to when God destroyed the earth. I mean, how much better could anything be,” Givan said.

    We need to turn this into our new slogan: Make Earth Great Again

    I’ll start working on the hats …

  16. docbill:
    They’re stealing our water, they’re bringing Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulators, along with interplanetary parasites, and the rest I assume are good Martians.

  17. “From Noah’s flood to my front yard, how much better can it get,” Wayne Propst said. Propst is stunned. He was helping his aunt lay some dirt outside her home in Tyler when he found this. “What’s really interesting to me is we’re talking about the largest catastrophe known to man, the flood that engulfed the entire world,” Propst said. . . . He called up self-proclaimed fossil expert Joe Taylor who confirmed that what Propst found is in fact from the time of Noah’s ark and he says finding those fossils in Tyler is rare. “I’ve never heard of anything about that from over there, I’m surprised he found it there,” Taylor said.

    As the Three Stooges’ Curly Howard might have said, “Nyuk, nyuk, nyuk!”

    Anyone who has to proclaim himself an “expert” surely isn’t one.

  18. Don A in Pennsyltucky

    Speaking of the angel Moroni….
    When Joseph Smith and his band of Mormons crossed the Illinois River at Phillips Ferry (near modern day Valley City, Illinois) some of his followers noted a fairly large mound on the bluff top and proceeded to dig into it. They unearthed a large “thigh bone” and — almost as if on cue — Prophet Smith had a vision which reveled that this bone was from Zelph (The White Lamanite) who was a giant.

  19. Techreseller

    Thank goodness I had already swallowed the sip of tea. OTherwise it would have been all my keyboard. I have to learn not to have liquid in my mouth when I begin reading these posts.

  20. Move over Ken Hambo, Joe Taylor’s proves the creation story one fossil at a time. It is scary to to google names and find out what absolute nonsense they are trying to sell.