Another Ark Replica — And It Sails!

A few years ago we wrote Hey, Ken Ham: A Dutchman Builds Noah’s Ark, in which we reported:

A faithful reproduction of Noah’s ark, using the dimensions in The Bible, has just opened to the public in The Netherlands. It was constructed by the Dutch creationist and millionaire building contractor Johan Huibers, after he dreamt that Holland would be flooded once again. … [T]he mammoth effort took him and his team of five just over four years to finish.

Hubers’ ark is back in the news. In USA Today we read Noah’s Ark replica could travel to Brazil this year. They have a comments feature. Here are some excerpts from the news story, with bold font added by us:

A massive replica of Noah’s ark could travel from the Netherlands to Brazil this year. The ark, which was created by Dutch carpenter Johan Huibers, will stop at several port cities in Brazil and make four stops along the coast of the U.S., according to the Ark of Noah Foundation, which is working to raise funds for the ark’s journey.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! We wonder what ol’ Hambo thinks of this. His land-locked Ark will forever be stuck in Kentucky, where it’s being built by, shall we say, considerably more than a team of five. Let’s read on:

The modern ark, dubbed “Johan’s Ark,” is a fully-functioning replica of Noah’s Ark, as described in the book of Genesis in the Bible. It is Huibers second ark and has been open to visitors in the Netherlands since 2012.

Why would anyone bother going to Kentucky to see Hambo’s ark, when a trip to Holland would probably be far more enjoyable? The news story ends with this:

“Once in Brazil the Ark will be using techniques that include virtual and augmented reality to tell original different biblical themes and stories in an interactive and challenging way,” the organization said in a statement.

Here’s a link to that statement. It’s a press release from the Christian Newswire. Among other things, it says:

Noah’s Ark will be in Fortaleza for the 2016 Olympic Games and Rio de Janeiro for the Paralympic summer games.

A trip to Brazil also seems like more fun than going to Kentucky. It looks like ol’ Hambo’s got some serious competition.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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19 responses to “Another Ark Replica — And It Sails!

  1. Last I checked up on the Dutchman his ark was not allowed to sail; something about permits and safety.

    In other news, Kent Hovind is supposed to be acquiring property in Alabama today (130 acres), and has a full size ark in in plans, along with what he claims might be the world’s biggest fake dinosaur.

    And the Hovind family feud appears to be heating up as Kent’s divorce is becoming a done deal and the attacks against Eric and Jo heat up.

  2. I am also under the impression that the ark itself is not seaworthy at all.

    It is built on old barges which may or may not be seaworthy.

  3. Robert Baty says: “I am also under the impression that the ark itself is not seaworthy at all.”

    I remember the stories about permit problems, and I don’t know if the Dutch ark is seaworthy. But somehow they plan to get it to Brazil. Maybe it’ll be towed. If so, they must be confident that it won’t sink.

  4. Permits or no, it is definitely more seaworthy than Ham’s.

  5. I seem to remember reading in several places that a wood boat that was the ark’s dimensions would not have the structural integrity to make it into open water.

  6. @Curmudgeon and GreenPoisonFrog: No problem. They’ll just get a Hensa Heavy Lift ship to carry it across the Atlantic. I just saw one of these in Provincetown MA, and they’re impressive. See: see some here

  7. Charles Deetz ;)

    What the heck are “original different biblical themes and stories “? Better not be re-writing the gospels of genesis!

  8. Dave Luckett

    If this, er, vessel were of the size specified in the Bible, and if it were built of the specified materials, namely wood and pitch, or at most with only limited bronze pinning, then it would most certainly not be seaworthy in itself. There is no conceivable way that it could survive a moderate North Atlantic blow. A planked and wooden hull of that length would simply open like a birdcage as it warped to every roll and pitch.

    This “replica” is bedded in concrete on a couple of flat-bottomed steel barges. I read somewhere that it was towed on those barges briefly along the coast of the Netherlands – no doubt they waited for a calm – before being moored on a branch off a canal. This is the limit that it could be safely expected to do. It is also extensively braced and pinned in steel, with steel hull plates reinforcing its timbers. But that is only to preserve structural integrity under its own weight. Put it under torsive stress, and the steel members will tear out of the wood.

    The best shipwrights in the world, with steel tools, working with the best timbers of the New World and hundreds of years of traditional skills plus the best knowledge of the twentieth century, AND steel bracing and buttplates AND with steam pumps, found that the practical limit for a wooden hull that had to cope with ordinary seas was about two-thirds the claimed length and half the capacity of the Ark – and that was pushing it. Any larger was a sure widowmaker.

    There’s no way this thing is going to cross the Atlantic, except as deck cargo on one of those heavy-lift ships. No licencing authority in its right mind would ever issue a seaworthiness certificate. If she ever left port, it would be clandestinely. Any person or persons sailing in her would do so at their own risk, and their deaths should be recorded as “suicide”.

  9. One longs to know the cost of Huibers’ ark and how it compares to that of Ham’s landlocked folly. How much money did the Dutchman have to raise, and did he get any tax breaks in doing so?

    At least, in the name of Free Enterprise, one must welcome competition! Which phoney ark will the Invisible Hand spare?

  10. Dave Luckett dares to question the scriptural account of Noah’s Ark on the grounds that

    A planked and wooden hull of that length would simply open like a birdcage as it warped to every roll and pitch.

    Doubtless that is true of a vessel that were the mere handiwork of fallible man. But–you fool!–Noah’s Ark was built at the command of GAWD AWMIGHTY HIMSELF! How can you possibly doubt that the Great Sky Fairy, who could part the waters of the Red Sea by an act of will alone, was not capable of caulking the Ark with sufficient Pixie Dust to keep out all the waters of the earth?

    Just something for you to think about during your eternal torments in the Lake o’ Fire…

  11. The best shipwrights in the world, with steel tools, working with the best timbers of the New World and hundreds of years of traditional skills plus the best knowledge of the twentieth century, AND steel bracing and buttplates AND with steam pumps, found that the practical limit for a wooden hull that had to cope with ordinary seas was about two-thirds the claimed length and half the capacity of the Ark – and that was pushing it. Any larger was a sure widowmaker.

    And that’s just with “ordinary seas,” not the raging waters and machine-gun rain which could be expected in a flood depositing, let’s see, hum de hum, 25,000/40, more than six hundred twenty-five feet (nearly an eighth of a mile) of rain each day.

  12. @Eric Lipps
    Let us not forget that the waters were so turbulent that they carved out the Grand Canyon.

  13. Eddie Janssen

    @Eric: rain comes from evaporated seawater, so it doesn’t add anything to the waterlevel. On the contrary. Between evaporation and falling back again rainwater is in the air, thus lowering the sealevel!
    I think Ken Ham will point you to ‘the waters of the deep’.
    But ofcourse, that makes the rain, and the rainbow promise after the flood a tad silly.

  14. @Eric Janssen
    But the rain for Noah’s Flood came from God opening up the windows in the firmament and letting free the waters which were stored behind the firmament during the creation week.
    In one variation on this, this is the releasing of the “vapor canopy”.

  15. Now that Ham’s Ark is nearly complete, it may seem that he is already beginning to shift his focus to future “phases” of his fundamentalist Disneyland. “The Tower of Babel” is apparently the next structure to be resurrected from the pages of Bronze Age mythology, and it may not be a coincidence that he has spent days talking about that particular legend in the audio files he releases more or less daily. Latest offering:
    https://answersingenesis.org/media/audio/answers-with-ken-ham/volume-121/the-tower-of-babel-a-ziggurat/

    Presumably he plans on dragging his fans back to the park over and over again, to see this or that new “attraction” (since the Ark itself may get old faster than he would like).

  16. Eddie Janssen

    @Tom: I thought the vapor canopy had more problems than the sea-worthiness of the ark itself (for instance: http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/canopy.html).

  17. @TomS: Let’s not forget that the deluge carved out not only the Grand Canyon, but the Great Plains, as well.

  18. @Mark Germano
    I was living on the shore of Lake Michigan when I first heard of the Deluge carving out the Grand Canyon. It is so flat that there is a sand dune called “Mount Baldy”.
    @Eddie Janssen
    Maybe the vapor canopy is more problematic than most aspects of YEC, and that’s saying a lot.

  19. I recall hearing for the first time about a “vapor canopy” when I was young and working in my first “real” job after college. A co-worker of mine mentioned it in some discussion, probably about evolution, and I was so stunned I had no idea what to say. I did not know there were people that actually, really, believed things like that. I think I just stared at him. He didn’t look loony, had no aluminum hat, was wearing an ordinary suit and tie, and yet he stated that there was a sphere of water surrounding the earth 6,000 years ago with a completely straight face. As though it was simply a fact.

    It was my introduction to the crazy world of creationism.