Ray Comfort Is Giving His Book Away

We haven’t had an opportunity to write about Ray Comfort lately, possibly because he no longer shows up in WorldNetDaily. He’s best known for his starring role in Ray Comfort’s “Banana video”.

Today we found some news about him in the Christian Post, which describes itself as “the nation’s most comprehensive Christian news website.” Their intriguing headline is Evangelist Ray Comfort to Give Away $25K in Gift Cards to Atheists at Reason Rally. We don’t see any comments feature. Here are some excerpts from their news, with bold font added by us:

New Zealand-born evangelist and creationist Ray Comfort, co-host of the “The Way of the Master” TV show, has said he will give the thousands of atheists attending the Reason Rally 2016 in Washington D.C. on June 4 $25,000 worth of Subway gift cards, alongside a copy of his book.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! Comfort is crashing the event to promote his book. This reminds us of the time he was giving away copies of Darwin’s Origin of Species, augmented by his own 50-page introduction, revealing what he claims are the theory’s many flaws. We wrote about that in WorldNetDaily, Ray Comfort, and Brain Death. Okay, back to the news:

“Most atheists don’t know that there’s never been an atheist president, that no member of Congress is an atheist, that in some states it’s illegal for atheists to run for office, and that recent surveys show atheists in America are about as popular as rapists. It’s a fascinating read,” Comfort said of the book, titled Why Pigs Will Fly Before America Has an Atheist President.

The book has no Amazon listing — the first time that’s ever happened. Also, we have doubts about all of Comfort’s claims, but so what? This is fun! The Christian Post quotes Comfort:

This is a small token of our love for atheists, and when we run out of books and gift cards we will give them millions of dollars,” he quipped, referring to the joke million-dollar bill, based on the book.

We suspect Comfort got those gift cards for free, but unlike his book, they may have some value. Let’s read on:

The Reason Rally is set to be one of the biggest ever gatherings of atheists in the U.S., with organizers expecting close to 20,000 people to attend.

They will undoubtedly be thrilled to have Comfort lurking around. The Christian Post goes on a bit more, but we’ve given you the highlights. If you plan to be in Washington D.C. on 04 June, this is your big chance to get a free copy of Comfort’s book. How can you go wrong?

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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17 responses to “Ray Comfort Is Giving His Book Away

  1. “Most atheists don’t know that there’s never been an atheist president, that no member of Congress is an atheist, that in some states it’s illegal for atheists to run for office,…”
    This largely but unfortunately true. Good book (not Comfort’s book) to read on the subject is “The Myth of American Religious Freedom” by David Sehat.

  2. Wikipedia has a “List of atheists in politics and law”, with a section on the USA.

  3. I thinik most atheists already know those things. I also think there have been some atheists in Congress, and/or the Senate and they carefully hid that information.

  4. I seem to remember that Barney Frank came out as an athiest after he retired from congress. It was noted at the time that the hatred of athiests was so great that he was willing to let it be know that he was gay while in congress but he hid his athiest belief.

  5. michaelfugate

    Pete Stark D- 13th District California.

  6. Mike Elzinga

    Heh. So Ray Comfort is entering hell and offering bribes to entice atheists to take copies of his book.

    Maybe he has a bunch of his books stacked up all over his place and can’t get rid of them.

    I’d take the money and turn down the book.

  7. Dave Luckett

    I wonder if the book is printed on shiny paper?

    I am reminded of someone – I can’t be bothered to find out who, just now – who wrote to an author, “I am sitting in the smallest room of my house with your book before me. Soon it will be behind me.”

  8. Dave – Max Reger. (sp?)

  9. Dave Luckett

    It is a matter of some comfort to us in the Antipodes that we have given to the USA not one, but two of our stalwart sons to correct the benighted Americans.

    Er… it couldn’t be because the Ken and Ray Show had lousy ratings here, so they did like Big Daddy did, and took the message to a wider screen? Where people would actually pay for admission to the show?

    Nah. Couldn’t be that.

  10. Dave Luckett:
    “It is a matter of some comfort to us…

    No pun intended, right?

  11. @Dave Luckett & Mary L:

    This from Wikipedia:
    “Reger had an acrimonious relationship with Rudolf Louis, the music critic of the Münchener Neueste Nachrichten, who usually had negative opinions of his compositions. After the first performance of the Sinfonietta in A major, Op. 90, on 2 February 1906, Louis wrote a typically negative review on 7 February. Reger wrote back to him: “Ich sitze in dem kleinsten Zimmer in meinem Hause. Ich habe Ihre Kritik vor mir. Im nächsten Augenblick wird sie hinter mir sein!” (“I am sitting in the smallest room of my house. I have your review before me. In a moment it will be behind me!”).

  12. Wow a great gimmick for Ray. These subway cards are often used by charities to raise money. The business kicks in up to 90% of the face value, then normally they are sold (at face value) for a charity to make money. In this case Ray just swallows the loss and gives them away. This is great p.r. for the rubes that support Ray. Makes a lot of noise and gets donations for selling something that isn’t all that expensive.
    Comfort might have a point, at least to running as an open atheist. Talk is very cheap, and announcing you’re a theist while running isn’t going to lose you any votes, but running as an atheist will. Politicians routinely pander to the lowest common denominator in this way.

  13. I would be more likely to trust the politician who openly proclaims an agnostic or atheist view than one who avers deep faith. I would know the agnostic is telling the truth. Might not be the brightest political move, but at least it’s honest.

  14. The lack of overtly atheist or agnostic politicians in higher office is a reflection on the way we choose our candidates rather than the candidates themselves. Specifically, we nominate them through a primary system in which the fringes of the party vote in disproportionate numbers. Rational candidates are disadvantaged by the process.

    Ironically, Trump probably comes closest to being overtly non-religious than anyone in recent memory, and he’s the republican nominee. I suspect the religious right is going crazy about now.

  15. Eric Lipps

    “Most atheists don’t know that there’s never been an atheist president, that no member of Congress is an atheist, that in some states it’s illegal for atheists to run for office, and that recent surveys show atheists in America are about as popular as rapists. It’s a fascinating read.”

    According to this article the states where it’s illegal for atheists to run for office are (deep breath, as if preparing to utter some shocking revelation) Maryland, Arkansas, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, all Southern states (even Maryland is below the Mason-Dixon line). And (another shocking revelation) these bans are being challenged under Article VI of the U.S. Constitution, which expressly forbids the use of any religious test for public office.

    And considering the (genuine) unpopularity of atheists, presidents and members of congress who in fact are atheists might well choose not to advertise it, so how can anyone know for sure that there’s never been one in the White House? As for Mr. Comfort’s claim about Congress, that’s not quite true either.

    Even if both assertions were true, however, that would not bear on the legitimacy of atheism, but rather only on its popularity. There was a time when Catholics were so unpopular in this country that no member of that faith could be elected president, as Al Smith found out to his cost in 1928, and anti-Catholic sentiment was still strong enough in America in 1960 for John F. Kennedy’s religion to be a potent issue in that year’s presidential election. But these days, Catholics are accepted enough for right-wing evangelical Protestants to eagerly seek their support on such issues as abortion. Who’s to say there won’t be a similar, dare I say the word, evolution regarding atheists?

  16. Eric Lipps

    “Most atheists don’t know that there’s never been an atheist president, that no member of Congress is an atheist, that in some states it’s illegal for atheists to run for office, and that recent surveys show atheists in America are about as popular as rapists. It’s a fascinating read.”./blockquote>
    According to this article the states where it’s illegal for atheists to run for office are (deep breath, as if preparing to utter some shocking revelation) Maryland, Arkansas, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, all Southern states (even Maryland is below the Mason-Dixon line). And (another shocking revelation) these bans are being challenged under Article VI of the U.S. Constitution, which expressly forbids the use of any religious test for public office.

    And considering the (genuine) unpopularity of atheists, presidents and members of congress who in fact are atheists might well choose not to advertise it, so how can anyone know for sure that there’s never been one in the White House? As for Mr. Comfort’s claim about Congress, that’s not quite true either.

    Even if both assertions were true, however, that would not bear on the legitimacy of atheism, but rather only on its popularity. There was a time when Catholics were so unpopular in this country that no member of that faith could be elected president, as Al Smith found out to his cost in 1928, and anti-Catholic sentiment was still strong enough in America in 1960 for John F. Kennedy’s religion to be a potent issue in that year’s presidential election. But these days, Catholics are accepted enough for right-wing evangelical Protestants to eagerly seek their support on such issues as abortion. Who’s to say there won’t be a similar, dare I say the word, evolution regarding atheists?

  17. Techreseller

    Hmmm. I like Subway sandwiches. I live in DC. I am a atheist. The paper in the book likely degrades quickly and can be used to suppress the weeds in my garden. Win win here for me. I will attend and look for Mr. Comfort. Nice foot long tuna sandwich coming up.