Answers in Genesis Probes Alien Abductions

There’s a fascinating new article at the website of Answers in Genesis (AIG) — the creationist ministry of Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo), the Australian entrepreneur who has become the ayatollah of Appalachia.

The title is Alien Abductions: Freaky or Fiction?, written by Danny Faulkner. Here’s AIG’s biographical information about him. They say he taught physics and astronomy until he joined AIG. His undergraduate degree is from Bob Jones University. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis, and scripture references omitted. It begins with the question: “Do ETs Exist?”:

[T]he Bible does not address the question of whether there is intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. However, we can use biblical principles to reach a conclusion about extraterrestrial aliens (ETs).

AIG doesn’t need telescopes or any other silly science stuff to know about aliens. The bible is sufficient. Faulkner explains:

Romans 8 makes it clear that man’s sin has tainted the entire universe. So if there were beings on other planets similar to man, then those beings would be subject to the effects of man’s sin. Would this be just?

No, it wouldn’t be just. Nor is it just that all of humanity should be cursed by the sin of Adam & Eve — yet we’re told that we are. So the question of whether the curse unfairly affects aliens doesn’t seem very relevant. Faulkner ignores that issue. Instead he says:

Could sentient beings on other planets be fallen creatures? If so, and since these beings are not descendants of Adam, what would be God’s plan of redemption for them? The Bible indicates that man was made in God’s image and is the center of God’s attention, leaving no room for other beings. It is clear from these and other considerations that there are no “aliens” living on other planets.

Okay — that question is decisively resolved. There aren’t any aliens. But that leaves another question:

If there are no extraterrestrial aliens, then there can be no flying saucers piloted by them. So how do we explain all of those sightings of UFOs? Most can be explained by misidentification of other objects, such as bright stars and planets, aircraft, and weather balloons, to name just a few. A few sightings remain unexplained, but that does not mean that they necessarily are flying saucers — they just haven’t been identified.

But how do we know? Let’s read on:

However, some people have reported more than just sightings of flying saucers, but have gone further to say that they have had direct interaction with aliens. Some of these reports merely are communication with aliens, while others involve being taken aboard spaceships. Some of these stories include traveling great distances aboard spacecraft. Much more disturbing, some people claim that while aboard spacecraft, aliens carried out bizarre investigations of their bodies. Many of these amount to vivisections and often are sexual in nature. We cannot attribute these sorts of claims to misidentifications, so what are we to make of many of these claims of alien abductions?

Why don’t we simply believe them, as we are told to believe all the tales in the bible? The answer is complicated. Faulkner continues:

It is probable that at least some people who claim to have been abducted by aliens simply have concocted their stories. Possible motives for such fabrications vary, but could include profit or desire to be important. Other stories of alien abduction may have been the result of vivid dreams. Some people may truly believe that they have been abducted by aliens, but they may have merely suffered some sort of delusion.

Couldn’t the same be said of various tales in the bible? How are we supposed to decide these things? After Faulkner describes three well-publicized reports of alien encounters, we’re told:

[M]ost people who have claimed these close encounters with aliens profess spirituality, with a belief in God. As such, there is a wide distribution of denominations and sects represented among those who have claimed alien abduction. People reporting alien abductions also report indulging in the occult and new age practices in much higher proportion than the general population. Conspicuously absent from those reporting alien abductions are those who are truly born again followers of Christ.

Wow — that’s important! It would appear that truly religious people don’t have alien encounters. As further evidence, Faulkner tells us:

In fact, many researchers have collected reports of alien abductions abruptly ending when abductees verbally mention the name of Jesus.

Amazing! Here’s more:

These facts are extremely pertinent. If those who report alien abductions are sincere and truthful in relaying experiences that they firmly believe occurred, then we are left with the conclusion that there is a spiritual component, and that this spirituality is contrary to the Bible.

Aha — tales of alien encounters are contrary to the bible! Now this UFO stuff is starting to make sense. Moving along:

This is just one front in a spiritual war to divert people away from the truth of Scripture. We have already seen that the implication of the Bible is that Adam’s race is the only race of sentient, physical creatures in the universe. That is, there are no ETs to fly spaceships to earth. But if one believes in evolution, one must accept the likelihood that life, even intelligent life, has evolved many times on other worlds. Thus, if life exists elsewhere, then that would argue against the Bible and hence the God of the Bible.

Yes — yes — at last we understand! It’s the evolutionists who are spreading tales of aliens and their abominable probes! Faulkner drives that point home (so to speak) at the end of his article:

So a very effective tool in undermining the authority of the Bible and the gospel would be to convince as many people as possible that life exists elsewhere. What better way is there to do that than with flying saucers and “alien” visitations?

Verily, there’s no limit to how tricky those evolutionists are. But now we know — alien probes are a Darwinian fantasy.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

20 responses to “Answers in Genesis Probes Alien Abductions

  1. So someone being taken for a ride inside a flying saucer is a preposterous impossibility while someone being taken for a ride inside a whale is a straightforward matter of history? I think I’m beginning to understand.

  2. Derek Freyberg

    So those probing aliens are really Satan in disguise?

  3. Ken Phelps

    “A few sightings questions remain unexplained, but that does not mean that they necessarily are flying saucersGod — they just haven’t been identified.”

  4. “verbally mention”
    I know this is nit-picking, but what ways are there to nonverbally mention?

  5. Must have been a really, really slow day at AIG to come up with this drivel. But it definitely sounds like it’s Danny who’s filled with swamp gas!

  6. He taught physics and astronomy before he joined AIG? And at a real school, too. How does someone exposed to real science spout nonsense like this?

  7. I don’t believe in alien visitations, much less abductions, but the probability that ETs exist somewhere – and even that they could travel to Earth – is vastly higher than the probability that a supernatural creature caused a worldwide flood. Multiply that zero probability by the probability that one family hand built an enormous ship and rode out the supernatural flood accompanied by dinosaurs and pterodactyls and thousands of other species of animals and birds 6,000 years ago – also zero.

  8. Mike Elzinga

    Ah, but didn’t Ezekiel see “wheels” in the sky?

    How do we know that Ezekiel didn’t see alien spaceships?

    It’s in their bible, isn’t it?

  9. Eric Lipps

    Conspicuously absent from those reporting alien abductions are those who are truly born again followers of Christ.

    Wow — that’s important! It would appear that truly religious people don’t have alien encounters. As further evidence, Faulkner tells us:

    In fact, many researchers have collected reports of alien abductions abruptly ending when abductees verbally mention the name of Jesus.

    Snicker. Where to begin?

    Well, one might point out that if there were alien abductions and if “born again followers of Christ” were among those abducted, they’d be just about the last to admit it, since it would mark them as touched by the devil.

    As for Faulkner’s claim about abductions ending abruptly when abductees mention the name of Christ–I’d love to know who those “many researchers” are (or even just one of them). UFOs were a hobby of my grandfather’s, and he had a lot of books about them, including books on alien abductions. And in none of those books was there any mention of a case where aliens were chased away by invoking the name of Christ.

  10. As for Faulkner’s claim about abductions ending abruptly when abductees mention the name of Christ–I’d love to know who those “many researchers” are (or even just one of them). UFOs were a hobby of my grandfather’s, and he had a lot of books about them, including books on alien abductions. And in none of those books was there any mention of a case where aliens were chased away by invoking the name of Christ.

    I was puzzled by this too, Eric Lipps. I’m by no means as knowledgeable as someone like your grandfather but I’ve done a certain amount of reading and research in the field and had lengthy discussions on the subject with a couple of ufologists (the most distinguished of them rejoiced in the fact that I was wholly skeptical, because I gave her and her colleagues reason to rethink their act, reassess stuff they’d always taken for granted, etc.), and I really can’t recall coming across this claim before. It may well be there in the literature somewhere, of course, but I don’t recall it.

  11. Besides, doesn’t the claim that the name of Jesus caused abductions to end contradict the previous statement that Christians don’t get abducted?

  12. Paul D. says: “Besides, doesn’t the claim that the name of Jesus caused abductions to end contradict the previous statement that Christians don’t get abducted?”

    I was wondering when one of you guys would notice that. Also, of course, it assumes that there are aliens — but they freak out at the mention of Jesus’ name.

  13. Does wolfsbane keep the (space) aliens away? How about garlic. I usually put a lot of garlic in my pasta sauce so perhaps that’s why I’ve never see any space aliens. And can you combine Jesus’s name with other things, as in “Jesus H(aploid) Christ!”

  14. Yeah, Faulkner’s claim that the name of Jesus is kryptonite for aliens sounds like a dog-whistle for the “aliens are demons” conspiracy crowd. Invoking the name of Jesus is obviously a common exorcism trope for repelling demons, and some fairly well-known evangelical theologians (e.g. Norman Geisler) claim that aliens are demons trying to create demon-human hybrids. That must be what Faulkner believes for his comments to make sense, but he doesn’t want to say so in as many words, since that would make him look crazy.

  15. @Paul D: Too late for that (Faulkner avoiding sounding crazy, that is).

  16. I think Faulkner is saying that no True Christian gets abducted by ETs. Or that there are no atheists in foxholes or UFOs. To be honest, I haven’t the foggiest idea what he’s talking about it, I just know that this is all evolution’s fault.

    No Darwin, no Jar-Jar Binks!

  17. Pete Moulton

    abeastwood: “How does someone exposed to real science spout nonsense like this?”

    You could ask Kurt Wise the same question.

  18. @ Mark Germano:

    How rude!

  19. @Paul D:

    and some fairly well-known evangelical theologians (e.g. Norman Geisler) claim that aliens are demons trying to create demon-human hybrids.

    Geisler told the Federal court trying the 1980 Arkansas “equal time for creationism” law that in his theology “UFOs would be Agents of Satan!.” Evangelicals have to hate the sin but love the sinner, while skeptic can love both the creationists and the wonderful things they say!

  20. Hm. So the contraction really means Unsanctified Flying Objects?