The Boston Globe Mocks Ark Encounter

The Boston Globe has an article that is likely to upset Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo). He’s the Australian entrepreneur who has become the ayatollah of Appalachia, famed not only for his creationist ministry, Answers in Genesis (AIG), but also for the infamous, mind-boggling Creation Museum, and for building an exact replica of Noah’s Ark.

The Globe‘s headline is Kentucky’s ark defies science but evokes a version of Christianity. They have a comments section, but there aren’t any yet. The article isn’t written as a direct attack, but rather as a tongue-in-cheek description of ol’ Hambo’s ark. It doesn’t say anything we don’t already know, but we like the way they handle this topic. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

In the beginning, Ken Ham made the Creation Museum in northern Kentucky. And he saw that it was good at spreading his belief that the Bible is a book of history, the universe is only 6,000 years old, and evolution is wrong and is leading to our moral downfall.

And Ham said, let us build a gargantuan Noah’s ark only 45 minutes away to draw millions more visitors. And let it be constructed by Amish woodworkers, and financed with donations, junk bonds, and tax rebates from the state of Kentucky. And let it hold an animatronic Noah and lifelike models of some of the creatures that came on board two-by-two, such as bears, short-necked giraffes, and juvenile Tyrannosaurus rexes.

And it was so.

See what we mean? They’re laughing at Hambo and his holy pretensions, but it’s subtle. Well, somewhat subtle. Skipping over a lot of stuff we know, they quote the great man himself:

“The reason we are building the ark is not as an entertainment center,” Ham said in an interview in a cabin overlooking the construction site. “I mean it’s not like a Disney or Universal, just for anyone to go and have fun. It’s a religious purpose. It’s because we’re Christians and we want to get the Christian message out.”

The ark is also intended to serve as a vivid warning that, according to the Bible, God sent a flood in Noah’s time to wipe out a depraved people, and God will deliver a fiery end to those who reject the Bible and accept modern-day evils like abortion, atheism, and same-sex marriage. “We’re becoming more like the days of Noah in that we see increasing secularization in the culture,” Ham said.

Yes, it’s a wonderful message. Humanity is in danger of being slaughtered again. Fun for the whole family! Let’s read on:

Yet his interpretation of what he calls “the Christian message” is derided by most scientists and educators, and resented even by some Christians who consider it indefensible and even embarrassing. Young earthers believe that God created the universe in six 24-hour days, and since all of history is only 6,000 years, humans coexisted with dinosaurs. An exhibit at the Creation Museum shows two smiling children playing in a lush garden next to two petite Tyrannosaurus rexes.

Indefensible and even embarrassing. Hambo won’t like that! At the end, they quote one of Hambo’s best-known critics:

Bill Nye, best known as “the science guy” on television and in books, said in a telephone interview, “Humans and ancient dinosaurs did not live at the same time. It’s completely unreasonable.” Science has established that the earth is billions of years old, and no worldwide flood occurred in the last 6,000 years. “We’re going to raise a generation of kids who are scientifically illiterate,” said Nye, who debated Ham at the Creation Museum in 2014, a matchup watched online by millions.

We look forward to Hambo’s response. You know there will be one.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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12 responses to “The Boston Globe Mocks Ark Encounter

  1. Is there some way to make one of the Tyrannosaurus manikins chomp one of the kiddie manikin’s legs? Yum, a whole boat load of dinner!

  2. They’re laughing at Hambo and his holy pretensions, but it’s subtle.

    About as subtle as a hole in the road. Which is exactly how it should be when mocking the old fraud. Monty Python and the Ark of Ham, anyone?

  3. more like the days of Noah in that we see increasing secularization

    Where does the Bible speak of secularization? Certainly not in the story of the Flood. Is this just another addition to the prophecy of the Bible?

  4. The Curmudgeon says “Yes, it’s a wonderful message. Humanity is in danger of being slaughtered again.” Perhaps the ‘tuters can put together a bill requiring attendance by K-12th graders as part of their critical thinking plan.

  5. Ol’ Hambo doesn’t seem to notice that God promised not to kill us all again. But Jesus, on the other hand, invented Hell (there is no mention of Hell in the Old Testament) to punish people who don’t do as they’re told. Nice people Ol’ Hambo has on his side.

  6. He won’t like this one either:

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/21/opinions/kentucky-ark-costello/index.html

    and, it’s on CNN. A lot of people will see that.

  7. Like Realthog I’m happy with the lack of subtlety in this excellent mockery.

  8. So, the Ark was built to “get the Christian message out.
    So, going to the Ark is pretty much like going to church.
    So, paying the admission fee to receive the message is pretty much like giving an offering to support the work of the church.
    So, Ark attendees should be able to use the fee cost as a charitable deduction on their tax forms.
    So much for the NT concept that salvation is free.

  9. docbill1351

    So, the Ark was built to “get the Christian message out.
    So, going to the Ark is pretty much like going to church.
    So, paying the admission fee to receive the message is pretty much like giving an offering to support the work of the church.
    So, Ark attendees should be able to use the fee cost as a charitable deduction on their tax forms.
    So much for the NT concept that salvation is free.

    Also, partially funded by the Government. Also, allowed to discriminate in its hiring practices. Also, allowed to switch from a church to a business on a whim.

    So much for the US Constitution and the separation of church and state. Well done, Hambo, he get’s to keep your taxes tax free! Talk about winning!

  10. Eric Lipps

    “The reason we are building the ark is not as an entertainment center,” Ham said in an interview in a cabin overlooking the construction site. “I mean it’s not like a Disney or Universal, just for anyone to go and have fun. It’s a religious purpose. It’s because we’re Christians and we want to get the Christian message out.”

    But how many non-fundamentalists, er, ahem, non-Christians will go for any other reason than entertainment? Disneyfying the Bible is a poor way of spreading God’s word.

    The ark is also intended to serve as a vivid warning that, according to the Bible, God sent a flood in Noah’s time to wipe out a depraved people, and God will deliver a fiery end to those who reject the Bible and accept modern-day evils like abortion, atheism, and same-sex marriage. “We’re becoming more like the days of Noah in that we see increasing secularization in the culture,” Ham said.

    Where in the Noah tale does the Bible mention any of the above-named “evils,” let alone shudder secularism?

  11. Derek Freyberg

    Today’s New York Times has a similar article,too.

  12. Derek Freyberg says: “Today’s New York Times has a similar article,too.”

    I’ve seen it show up in six or seven newspapers.