Discovery Institute: 20 Years of Failure

The latest from the Discovery Institute is truly stunning: Register by Wednesday to See Revolutionary as We Look Forward to the Next 20 Years of ID!. It has no author’s byline. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us:

Join us on August 12 at 7:30 in Seattle to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Discovery Institute’s Center for Science & Culture! The deadline to register is next Wednesday, August 10, and we’re filling up fast.

We’ll enjoy the premiere of the new hour-long video documentary, Revolutionary: Michael Behe and the Mystery of Molecular Machines, and hear from not only the subject of the film, biochemist Dr. Behe, but other luminaries of the ID community, including Stephen Meyer, Richard Sternberg, and Douglas Axe.

Their post is full of links and videos, but we’ll ignore those. Then we’re told:

ID’s future was prefigured in its intellectual roots, and we’ll be honoring both. Who would have thought twenty years ago that in such a brief time, really, the truly revolutionary case for intelligent design would become a staple in scientific and general cultural discussions? That’s in large part thanks to Michael Behe.

Let us pause for a moment to consider the Discoveroids’ accomplishments in their first 20 years. We discussed their founding manifesto three years ago in What is the “Wedge Document”?, and we reviewed their lofty goals, which we repeat here:

Governing Goals
• To defeat scientific materialism and its destructive moral, cultural and political legacies.
• To replace materialistic explanations with the theistic understanding that nature and human beings are created by God.

Five Year Goals
• To see intelligent design theory as an accepted alternative in the sciences and scientific research being done from the perspective of design theory.
• To see the beginning of the influence of design theory in spheres other than natural science.
• To see major new debates in education, life issues, legal and personal responsibility pushed to the front of the national agenda.

Twenty Year Goals
• To see intelligent design theory as the dominant perspective in science.
• To see design theory application in specific fields, including molecular biology, biochemistry, paleontology, physics and cosmology in the natural sciences, psychology, ethics, politics, theology and philosophy in the humanities; to see its influence in the fine arts.
• To see design theory permeate our religious, cultural, moral and political life.

Is it our imagination, or have they failed to achieve every single one of those goals?

Also, their grand project to have the states enact their so-called Academic Freedom bills has been a catastrophic flop. Only two states — Louisiana and Tennessee — have enacted such laws. Their big moment in court to establish the right of local school boards to teach the Discoveroids’ version of creationism was another catastrophe — everyone knows about Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District.

Their efforts to efforts to penetrate secular universities have all failed. Even Baylor, a Baptist school, tossed them out — see Intelligent Design’s Brief Shining Moment. Let’s not forget Casey’s failed attempt to start a creationist groundswell on university campuses by setting up IDEA clubs. Wikipedia’s write-up on those is found here: Intelligent Design and Evolution Awareness Center.

The Discoveroids have failed at everything. Their grand crusade has gone absolutely nowhere. An interesting indicator can be seen in search engine statistics. Check out this history of Google searches on “intelligent design”. It peaked during the Kitzmiller trial in 2005, then it crashed, and it’s been steadily trending downward ever since.

It seems to us that their only accomplishment after 20 years is that they continued to raise enough funds to stay in business. Anyway, let’s go on a bit with their new post:

What is yet to come? Here’s a guess. As word gets out about the insuperable scientific challenges facing Darwinism, evolutionists will retreat to non-scientific speculations about Gaia, “natural magic,” impersonal sources of teleology, and the like. It’s like the retreat in cosmology to multiverse theory. Anything to evade design.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! We’re going to retreat into mysticism, while the Discoveroids dominate the world of science. Yeah, right! And now we come to the end:

The next twenty years are likely to be even more momentous than what we’ve seen so far. Let’s talk about that. Be sure to register now and participate in the conversation.

They won’t be around for another twenty years. It’s a toss-up as to who goes defunct first — Hambo or the Discoveroids.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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17 responses to “Discovery Institute: 20 Years of Failure

  1. A good example of whistling in the dark. Their world is actually crashing down around their ears but they are still trying to keep up appearances. Have they looked at the statistics regarding the decline in church membership and attendance?

  2. michaelfugate

    The deadline to register is next Wednesday, August 10, and we’re filling up fast.

    And I have a bridge for sale, cheap….

  3. No byline? Who’d want to take credit for that crap, though maybe someone like Klinghoffer might have penned that drivel.

  4. It’s a toss-up as to who goes defunct first — Hambo or the Discoveroids.

    Well, Hambo can probably induce more suckers to visit his Life-Size Ark Theme Park than the Discoveroids can attract to their Life-Size Flagellum Theme Park.

  5. Derek Freyberg

    I watched the trailer, and it looks like they’re going to go full Kitzmiller (CGI of a bacterial flagellum, pictures of the courthouse, and all). But I think I’ll wait for the movie to come out on the Discovery Institute Channel, or maybe YouTube.

    It’s a toss-up as to who goes defunct first — Hambo or the Discoveroids.
    I don’t think so: Ham has that old-time religion on his side, and the DI doesn’t. The Creation Museum may be drawing smaller audiences each year, and the Ark will probably never hit its attendance target; but Ham’s support base is both much larger and more heavily invested in (believing in) what he’s selling than the DI’s (which seems to be just one or two rich guys).

  6. Our Curmudgeon displays uncharacteristic optimism:

    The Discoveroids have failed at everything. Their grand crusade has gone absolutely nowhere.

    Would that it were so! But I fear celebrations are grossly premature. It is still the case that, in an allegedly advanced and educated nation as the United States, a major political party can nonetheless field in the presidential election–and with a good chance of success–a deranged demagogue like Trump with a full-blown Creationist candidate for VP: Mike Pence: Full-Tilt Cretard

  7. The DI has succeeded in one thing, at least here in Scotland; to help keep alive the illusion that there is genuine scientific uncertainty about evolution (of course there is, just as there is genuine scientific uncertainty about chemical bonding) and that therefore there was an intellectual case against common ancestry. I came up against it when giving evidence to a committee of the Scottish Parliament, and told the member concerned that there was scientifically speaking no doubt about it; he was second cousin to a monkey and fourth cousin to a mushroom.

    We got what we had hoped for from the committee

  8. It’s been a very successful 20 years in terms of paying the Discotute directors nice, fat salaries.

  9. Last couple of years the Discotute also has been very successful at providing food for mockery, as this very blog continues to testify.
    I bet Ol’ Hambo will have to call it quit first. The IDiots do nothing, so have few expenses and hence can easily cut down. Ol’ Hambo’s spectular newest project is steadily heading for a financial downfall. I would like to write that his Ark is going to run aground on a sandbank, but the thing doesn’t float anyway.

  10. michaelfugate

    Anyone know what Casey is up to?

  11. @Megalonyx: Thanks for the great Pence link, Megs! As a Hoosier, I had known that Pence was a fundamentalist, but I had never heard him speaking this forcefully against evolution until I saw your clip. Full-blown, indeed.

  12. docbill1351

    Reads like Klinkleklankle. Face it, he’s the only Tooter who can put two words together.

    Hey, no mention of the biggest name in ID, the brightest of the dim wits, the loser of every job – yes, I’m talking about Doctor Doctor “Single Malt” his own self, Willy Dumbski!

    How are they going to party like it’s 1996 without Willy-D?

  13. Mike Elzinga

    We still don’t know what will become of the two ID/Creationists, Eric Hedin and Guillermo Gonzalez, hired at Ball State.

    After a rocky start with Hedin, so far they have managed to keep these ID/creationists within the bounds of teaching proper science instead of ID/Creationist pseudoscience. We will have to see what happens, and hope that the pressures of having to produce some real research will keep them in line.

    However, Ball State is not known as a top tier research institution.

  14. ID’s future was prefigured in its intellectual roots, and we’ll be honoring both. Who would have thought twenty years ago that in such a brief time, really, the truly revolutionary case for intelligent design would become a staple in scientific and general cultural discussions?

    Who indeed? Who thinks so now, outside the Discovery Institute and its fellow crank tanks?

    That’s in large part thanks to Michael Behe.

    Gee, thanks, Michael. And may you have as much success over the next twenty years.

    Let us pause for a moment to consider the Discoveroids’ accomplishments in their first 20 years. We discussed their founding manifesto three years ago in What is the “Wedge Document”?, and we reviewed their lofty goals, which we repeat here:

    Governing Goals
    • To defeat scientific materialism and its destructive moral, cultural and political legacies.
    • To replace materialistic explanations with the theistic understanding that nature and human beings are created by God.

    Five Year Goals
    • To see intelligent design theory as an accepted alternative in the sciences and scientific research being done from the perspective of design theory.
    • To see the beginning of the influence of design theory in spheres other than natural science.
    • To see major new debates in education, life issues, legal and personal responsibility pushed to the front of the national agenda.

    Twenty Year Goals
    • To see intelligent design theory as the dominant perspective in science.
    • To see design theory application in specific fields, including molecular biology, biochemistry, paleontology, physics and cosmology in the natural sciences, psychology, ethics, politics, theology and philosophy in the humanities; to see its influence in the fine arts.
    • To see design theory permeate our religious, cultural, moral and political life.

    Well, what more need be said? Obviously, the battle is won, so the Discovery Institute can close up shop or shift its focus to combating the unbiblical notion that the universe does not revolve around the earth.

  15. Michael Whohe? Outside of the crank tanks and people like us with an unfortunate hobby Whohe is totally unknown. Completely lacking in self-awareness my favorite Whohe quote was in an interview following his disastrous cross-examination in the Kitzmiller trial where Whohe single-handledly lost the case for the defendants. Whohe looked at the camera and said, “I think that went rather well!” I’m still laughing at that one!

  16. Momentum. well technically yes, in that they still exist, still publish their drivel. Increasing momentum. Huh, no.

  17. It sure was nice to realize that my highly developed brain was not evolved under the pressure for discovering scientific truths but only to be clever enough to survive.