Creationist Wisdom #725: All Over the Place

Today’s letter-to-the-editor appears in the Verde Independent of Cottonwood, Arizona. The newspaper has a comments section. The letter is titled ‘Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind’. Yes, the letter-writer uses that quote.

Because the writer isn’t a politician, preacher, or other public figure, we won’t embarrass or promote him by using his full name. His first name is Bill. He’s in the construction business, but that doesn’t qualify for full-name treatment. Excerpts from his letter will be enhanced with our Curmudgeonly commentary and some bold font for emphasis. Here we go!

Responding to some earlier letter, he declares:

Of the 55 men who formed the Constitution, 52 were active members of their churches. Christian churches. Not Muslin churches or Buddhist churches or Hindu churches but Christian churches. Nowhere in the Constitution are the words “separation of church and state” found. No where.

[*Groan*] See Is America a “Christian Nation”? Then he says:

Science and religion? Which science do you speak of? The 50-year-old science that described a fetus as a blob of cells or the current science that shows an unborn child sucking his thumb. Democrats hang their hats on the 50-year-old science and yet claim we horrible Christians ignore science. Excuse me?

So far, Bill has touched on theocracy (he likes it) and abortion (he doesn’t like it). Now he gets around to creationism:

Or maybe the 130-year-old science of Darwin who called the simple cell the building block of all living creatures. He knew nothing of the workings of a cell let alone DNA. You know, the DNA that says you will form a hand but not a wing. Or a wing and not a claw.

Yeah, Darwin was an idiot. Bill continues:

But I’ll bet you believe in evolution even though the pictures in textbooks of the horse-like creature that eventually became a full-sized horse were a complete hoax.

That’s in the TalkOrigins Index to Creationist Claims — right here.

We’ll skip the blather about global warming and the usual list of scientists who were Christians. There’s no reason why a scientist can’t be a Christian — or an Elvis fan, or both. But if their science work is any good, it’s unrelated to their other interests. Now he gets to the Einstein quote:

While Albert Einstein never came into belief in a personal God, he did recognize the impossibility of a non-created universe. His statement, “Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.”

Creationists always mine that quote from Einstein’s essay Science and Religion. But he also said in that same piece: “During the youthful period of mankind’s spiritual evolution human fantasy created gods in man’s own image, who, by the operations of their will were supposed to determine, or at any rate to influence, the phenomenal world.” At no time that we’re aware of did Einstein declare his belief in a deity, only in the utility of religion in the sphere of morality.

Bill’s letter ends with his endorsement of some candidate for the local school board, and lastly he says he’ll pray for the writer of the letter to which he’s responding.

Our title warned you that Bill’s letter was all over the place. People like that live among us. It’s an interesting world.

Copyright © 2016. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

6 responses to “Creationist Wisdom #725: All Over the Place

  1. Not Muslin churches

    True. Xtian churches tend to have a stronger architectural fabric.

  2. Eddie Janssen

    “While Albert Einstein never came into belief in a personal God, he did recognize the impossibility of a non-created universe.”
    The admission in the first part is quite unusual for a creationist. You have to give him that.

  3. “Not Muslin [sic] churches or Buddhist churches or Hindu churches but Christian churches.”

    One would have a hard time finding Muslim, Buddhist, or Hindu churches anywhere. Mosques and temples perhaps, but not churches. I’ll bet letter-writer Bill is voting for _______ . (Nah, I won’t say it. I’m sure all of SC’s regular readers can fill in the blank.)

  4. Is this proof that Duane Gish, in fact, reincarnated?

  5. One might mention that certain varieties of religions well represented in 18th century America did not have churches.

  6. Of the 55 men who formed the Constitution, 52 were active members of their churches. Christian churches. Not Muslin churches or Buddhist churches or Hindu churches but Christian churches. Nowhere in the Constitution are the words “separation of church and state” found. No where.

    The words aren’t, but their intent is: besides the First Amendment, which fundamentalists waterboard into saying that freedom of religion is protected but not freedom from religion (and how do they square this with their frequent claim that atheism is a religion, and that evolution is too?), there’s Article Six, which explicitly forbids the use of any religious test (yes, even involving Biblical literalism) for “any office or public trust under the United States.”