Rev. David Rives — Your Mouth Is A Miracle

You won’t believe this one. Rev. David Rives, the world’s cutest rev, interviews a dentist — yes, a dentist! — about the Marvels of the Mouth.

In only two minutes, the creationist dentist describes the miracles found in the mouth. The joints on each side of the jaw have to match. And that’s not all! There are so many other marvels — the tongue, the saliva, the muscles! The dentist says: “It had to be done right, and it had to be done the first time.” Evolution can’t explain it! You don’t want to miss this one — it’s amazing!

As we always do with the rev’s videos, we dedicate the comments section for your use as an Intellectual Free Fire Zone. You know the rules. Okay, the comments are open. Go for it!

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17 responses to “Rev. David Rives — Your Mouth Is A Miracle

  1. michaelfugate

    Always two sides to every issue…

  2. What’s with these creationist dentists?

  3. But if God designed the mouth just right, why do we need dentists?

  4. @realthog: It’s all because of that apple-touting serpent, don’tcha know…

  5. @retiredsciguy

    Ah! It’s the sugar in the apples wot gives us caries. I see it now, and repent my sinful skepticism.

  6. What proportion of modern human beings would develop impacted wisdom teeth without corrective surgery, Doc? What proportion of modern humans don’t actually develop wisdom teeth at all, or teeth that don’t erupt?

    Could it be that jaws and dentition are adapting to a diet that has changed over the last ten thousand years or so? Could it be that we are witnessing – gasp! – evolutionary change here?

    As Bugs Bunny used to say, “Ehh…. could be!”

  7. Why did God design the mouth? If God is omniscient and omnipotent, God could have made humans to get nutrition without eating – maybe with symbiosis or photosynthesis or suspension of the laws of nature.

  8. Cyano de Bacteregerac

    “[T]he tongue, the saliva, the muscles! … It had to be done right, and it had to be done the first time.”

    Me too, that was my experience of my first French kiss to a T.

  9. Well, Rev. Rives has finally convinced me! Glory be!

    But I’m still a tad confused as to why the Intelligent Designer(s) (Blessed be He/She/It/Them!) failed to provide a robust connection between the human mouth and the brain….

  10. It had to be done right the first time ….. so that’s why my jaws are too small for all my teeth, so that four of them had to be pulled when I was a teen.

  11. The Wikipedia article on Irreducible complexity references this book
    T. H. Frazzetta, Complex Adaptations in Evolving Populations, Sunderland, Massachusetts: Sinauer Associates, 1975.
    There is a description of the “complex adaptation” of the Peaucellier–Lipkin linkage in the jaw of the python as a product of evolution.

  12. One thing interesting about teeth, if you look carefully at a molar you can see evolution at work. Simpler conical fuse together to form a grinding surface.
    A lot of improvement could have been expected from the intelligent designer. Every time I go to the dentist I wish evolution had endowed us with a tertiary set.

  13. Troy:
    “Every time I go to the dentist I wish evolution had endowed us with a tertiary set.”

    Or better yet — teeth that don’t decay. Hey — if the Intelligent Designer is going to “get it right the first time,” He/She/It/ They should have gotten it right the first time. No “evolutionary do-overs.”

  14. A dentist acquaintance at my old gym frequently remarked how it’s evolution that explains the structures and variation he sees. Proof of evolution? Look in peoples mouths, he would say.

  15. Back in vertebrate evolution 101, they tell you that the first fish were jawless, jaws evolved later from the first pair of gill bars. Then there is the origin of teeth from scales, which also had an outer layer of enamel and a middle layer of dentin. I guess they don’t teach that in dentistry school. Or maybe they do.

  16. Troy | 2-November-2016 at 11:32 am |
    One thing interesting about teeth, if you look carefully at a molar you can see evolution at work. Simpler conical fuse together to form a grinding surface.
    A lot of improvement could have been expected from the intelligent designer. Every time I go to the dentist I wish evolution had endowed us with a tertiary set.

    How about teeth that get replaced throughout our lives, the way those of lizards are?