2017’s Darwin Day Resolution in Congress

It happens every year around this time, because 12 February is Charles Darwin’s birthday. As expected, House Resolution 44 has been introduced into Congress. It’s titled Expressing support for designation of February 12, 2017, as “Darwin Day” and recognizing the importance of science in the betterment of humanity. Here’s the full text:

Whereas Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution by the mechanism of natural selection, together with the monumental amount of scientific evidence he compiled to support it, provides humanity with a logical and intellectually compelling explanation for the diversity of life on Earth;

Whereas the validity of Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is further strongly supported by the modern understanding of the science of genetics;

Whereas it has been the human curiosity and ingenuity exemplified by Darwin that has promoted new scientific discoveries that have helped humanity solve many problems and improve living conditions;

Whereas the advancement of science must be protected from those unconcerned with the adverse impacts of global warming and climate change;

Whereas the teaching of creationism in some public schools compromises the scientific and academic integrity of the United States education systems;

Whereas Charles Darwin is a worthy symbol of scientific advancement on which to focus and around which to build a global celebration of science and humanity intended to promote a common bond among all of Earth’s peoples; and

Whereas February 12, 2017, is the anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin in 1809 and would be an appropriate date to designate as “Darwin Day”: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the House of Representatives —

(1) supports the designation of “Darwin Day”; and

(2) recognizes Charles Darwin as a worthy symbol on which to celebrate the achievements of reason, science, and the advancement of human knowledge.

The sponsor is James A. Himes, a Democrat from Connecticut. He serves on the Science, Space, and Technology Committee. The resolution has 13 co-sponsors — all Democrats. [*Sigh*]

We wrote about a similar resolution last year: Another Darwin Day Resolution in Congress, in which we said:

It’ll never pass. The resolution has some “Whereas” clauses that will drive the creationists crazy. … This thing is doomed, just like similar resolutions in prior years.

This one is doomed too. With the Republicans in control of the House, it’ll likely die in committee, where it probably won’t receive a single Republican vote. We’re hoping for at least one, so this thing isn’t a total embarrassment, but … well, we’ll find out soon enough.

Copyright © 2017. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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11 responses to “2017’s Darwin Day Resolution in Congress

  1. And biologists’ civil rights are further trampled.

  2. “Whereas the advancement of science must be protected from those unconcerned with the adverse impacts of global warming and climate change…”
    I suppose that global warming is considered the main threat from scientifically ignorant people. But it seems to me that the advancement of science must be protected from all kinds of unconcerned and misguided people.

  3. I’m trying to figure out when my Republican party became the official party of troglodytes? Or maybe I’m just kidding myself and it just always was that way?

  4. Erik John Bertel says: “I’m trying to figure out when my Republican party became the official party of troglodytes?”

    It was Nixon’s Southern strategy.

  5. I suspect quite a few Republicans accept science in general, including evolution. It’s just that the parties are so polarized that anything a Democrat proposes, no matter how non-political, has to be opposed. That policy was set when Obama was elected, and seems to be continuing even when the Republicans control all branches of the government.

    Also, there is the fact that the Republicans who vote in primaries (a small percent of the overall electorate) are predominately the crazy wing of the party.

    Maybe it will take a President that neither party likes to finally break down those barriers.

  6. Ceteris Paribus

    @Ed:
    It’s not actually a ‘party’ problem we face. It is just that the US electorate is chronically afflicted by a mental condition which the late Steve Allen called “Dumbth”, of which he wrote a small book about.

  7. Rep. Hines needs to brace himself for a server-crashing torrent of e-hatemail.

  8. Ed: Unfortunately, much of the GOP’s base consists of right-wing fundamentalist Christians who started fleeing the Democratic Party when Harry Truman desegregated the military and broke into a mad dash for the Republican Party when the supreme Court ruled that students in public schools couldn’t be forced to pray and that laws banning the teaching of evolution were unconstitutional.

  9. @Eric Lipps — The Tweeter-in-Chief will blast Hines in 3, 2, 1…..

  10. Eric Lipps says: “Unfortunately, much of the GOP’s base consists of right-wing fundamentalist Christians who started fleeing the Democratic Party when Harry Truman desegregated the military …”

    That wasn’t it. It was when Lyndon Johnson supported civil rights legislation — a huge break with tradition — and those who opposed that had to flee the Dem party.

  11. The Republicans won’t vote for this resolution. What is WRONG with this picture boys and girls?