Ken Ham Says Aliens Are a False Religion

We’ve written several times before about how creationists — including the Discoveroids — declare that there are no aliens out there, at least none that are intelligent. See, for example: Ken Ham Says There Are No Intelligent Aliens, and Intelligent Aliens Terrify the Discovery Institute.

Now we have a new twist on the subject from Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo), the ayatollah of Appalachia, the world’s holiest man who knows more about religion and science than everyone else. His new post is Study: A Belief in Aliens May Be a Religious Impulse. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis:

If you believe in aliens from outer space, it may just be a religious impulse. A recent Scientific American article [Belief in Aliens May Be a Religious Impulse] by Michael Shermer (founder of the Skeptics Society and the publisher of Skeptic magazine) highlights a recent set of studies at North Dakota State University (NDSU) that found “those who report low levels of religious belief but high desire for meaning in life show greater belief in ETIs [Extraterrestrial Intelligence].”

That’s consistent with creationists’ near-unanimous dis-belief in aliens. What does Hambo make of it? He explains:

Of course, everyone is religious, including atheists and skeptics — they just place their belief in an evolutionary worldview, naturalism, and humanism, instead of in Christ and his Word. Romans 1 tells us that God has made it evident to all that he is the Creator — that’s why all are without excuse. Everyone knows God exists — which is why people have this yearning to find meaning in life. Sadly, because of our sin nature, many refuse to acknowledge who the true God is — they would rather believe in aliens than believe in the God of the bible.

Perfectly logical. Then he says:

In one of the NDSU team’s studies, researchers found that atheists and agnostics “were statistically significantly more likely to report believing in ETIs than those who reported being religious (primarily Christian).”/span>

That’s because they’ve strayed from The Truth. After that, Hambo tells us:

Essentially, what these authors are saying is that atheists (whose religion is ultimately meaningless, purposeless, and hopeless) who are seeking a meaning for their lives may appeal to aliens to fulfill this role. Maybe if there’s something else out there, it will give their lives some meaning.

The poor, misguided fools! Hambo understands them so well. He continues:

But there is someone out there — our Creator! Our lives don’t have to be meaningless, purposeless, or hopeless because there is a God who knows us, loves us, and came to die on the Cross for us. We can have a personal relationship with our Creator because of his Son, and we can serve and worship him and be with him for eternity. He has revealed himself to us in his Word, in the person of Jesus Christ, and in how he has made himself evident from the created universe we live in.

Then he quotes from the end of Shermer’s article:

Given that there is no more evidence for aliens than there is for God, believers in either one must take a leap of faith or else suspend judgment until evidence emerges to the contrary. I can conceive of what that might be for ETI but not for God, unless the deity is a sufficiently advanced ETI as to appear divine.

You might think Shermer has a good point regarding evidence for aliens. Hambo, however, tops it with a better point:

But there is evidence for God all around us in what God has made — indeed there’s so much evidence for God in creation that those who reject him are without excuse [scripture reference]. Shermer and others like him choose to reject this evidence and instead interpret it through the lens of their naturalistic, evolutionary worldview. Yes, they would rather believe in nonexistent aliens for which there is no evidence instead of the God of creation, for which the evidence cries out, “In the beginning God created.”

Yeah — Hambo’s got evidence, and those atheists have nothing! He wraps it up with this:

Instead of appealing to nonexistent aliens for meaning and purpose, I encourage Shermer and other atheists like him, to turn to Jesus Christ and experience the hope and purpose he gives through the gospel.

So now you have a choice, dear reader. You can believe in Hambo’s religion, or the false religion of aliens — and suffer the eternal consequences. It’s up to you.

Copyright © 2017. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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18 responses to “Ken Ham Says Aliens Are a False Religion

  1. Aliens a religion?

    No, they are just a curiosity. But Ken Ham must be worried about it, if he has to use such a silly argument.

  2. Well Kenbo, as an atheist, I don’t believe extraterrestrial life exists. However, given the fact that there probably are some 10^20 or more planets in the universe, I think it’s a great deal more likely that there is extraterrestrial life on some of them than it is that any of the numerous sky fairies people have invented exist.

  3. a recent set of studies at North Dakota State University (NDSU) that found “those who report low levels of religious belief but high desire for meaning in life show greater belief in ETIs [Extraterrestrial Intelligence].”

    I seem to recall a study (I think it was done at Faith University of Central Kansas) that found that those who report low levels of religious belief but high desire for meaning in life show a greater belief in the power of beer. Or was it political conspiracy theories? Not sure.

    Point being, a seeming correlation between two unrelated ideas is meaningless.

    [Sidenote – I stopped by the campus a few years ago and tried to buy a sweatshirt with the school’s initials, but had no luck.]

  4. @abeastwood
    Well said. But if you want Ken Ham to understand what you’re saying, you shouldn’t state the number of planets in scientific notation.

    For Ken Ham:
    Number of planets: 100,000,000,000,000,000,000.

    Or perhaps: Five score followed by 18 zeros.

    Or another way to visualize it — there are roughly one thousand times more planets in the universe than the number of seconds since creation. (Which despite what you might think, Ken, occurred about 13 billion years ago.)

  5. Judging by the turmoil across the world at present, I`d say there are damn few intelligent humans.

  6. What we do have evidence for is that Ol’Hambo is an incurable liar. That evidence can be found on his very own website AIG.

  7. NDSU: “those who report low levels of religious belief but high desire for meaning in life show greater belief in ETIs.”

    Yes — both of them, actually.

    But seriously, all these “studies” show is that kids with a “high desire for meaning in life” will believe just about any damn thing — whether based more or less on evidence, logic and natural laws and reasoning (ETIs and sf), or not (eg, religion or Faerie).

    Straight out of Fargo: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11031-017-9605-y

  8. @retiredsciguy: “Or another way to visualize it — there are roughly one thousand times more planets in the universe than the number of seconds since creation.”

    Sorry, dude — I’m having difficulties visualizing a second.

  9. “Of course, everyone is religious, including atheists and skeptics”; “Everyone knows God exists”. Thus Ken Ham.

    Is that a knowing untruth or is it an expression of genuine inability to process reality? Is Ken Ham as crazy as a fox, or is he just plain crazy? Is it possible that anyone this side of Barking could say such things with a straight face, and mean it?

    But even that’s not the strangest thing of all, which is this: the people who read Ken’s screed believe it. They must do. Why else are they keeping the Ham clan in the style to which they’ve grown accustomed?

    That is to say, there is a measurable demographic that is actually crazy. Ken Ham might be only pandering to it, or he may be part of it, but that’s not what bothers me. Ham’s a loony or a con-man, or a bit of both, and the existence of individuals like him is inevitable. But an entire population who actually cannot parse reality at all – that’s a scary thought.

  10. @Dave Luckett
    Agreed.
    I am not interested in the leaders. Where there is a need, there will be people who will satisfy the need, that is well-established, and easily understood. The puzzle is that there are needs that will be satisfied, by such transparency, in such abundance.
    Which con man does one decide to follow?

  11. In Arthur C. Clarke’s sci-fi novel Childhood’s End, wise aliens come to earth, assume control and create a global utopia with world peace and universal prosperity. But for the longest time, the aliens are curiously reluctant to show themselves, and gently rule from their hovering ships.

    When the aliens finally deem that humanity has become mature enough to see its (by now beloved) “guardian angels”, it turns out that they look like the pop-cultural version of Satan, complete with horns, leathery wings and a barbed tail.

    One wishes it could happen for real, just to see the look on the faces of Ken Ham and his fellow fundamentalists.

  12. Skeptical Servant

    The reason we have not found aliens is due to the Fermi paradox and last time I checked the AIG crowd are still dumber than bricks.

  13. Speaking of Ken Ham:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/creationist-alberta-homeschool-convention-1.4392300

    “Ken Ham is listed as one of three keynote speakers at the annual Alberta Home Education Association (AHEA) convention next April in Red Deer.

    “Ham, an Australian native, has built a thriving ministry in Kentucky. He is the president and CEO of Answers in Genesis ministry, which focuses ‘on providing answers to questions about the Bible — particularly the book of Genesis — regarding key issues such as creation, evolution, science, and the age of the earth.'”
    . . . . .
    “Alberta Liberal leader David Khan says people have freedom of religion, but it shouldn’t interfere with their education.

    “‘It is a problem if they’re teaching this instead of the Alberta curriculum. And in fact I think I would have a problem if they were teaching this to children using public dollars in a homeschooling environment at all,’ he said.”
    . . . . .
    “[Calgarian Paul Ens] worries [that the AHEA will] buy Ham’s curriculum at the conference.

    “‘Unfortunately, Ken’s material is so anti-science, anti-education, his entire ministry is based upon keeping people back and holding back ideas,’ Ens said.

    “I worry about any organization that would celebrate this man. I don’t deny them their right; I just worry about their judgment.””

    We don’t worry about ol’ Hambo’s judgment — we know he knows what he’s doing.

    We worry about his intentions.

    (More at link.)

  14. If “everyone knows God exists,” then atheists don’t exist, so why does Ham rail against them? But then, where’s the Hamster’s evidence for this statement?

    As for belief in aliens being religious in nature, it’s certainly true that it can be. (Read <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orfeo_Angelucci‘s book The Secret of the Saucers as an example–just don’t buy it. Oddly, though, many of them seem to involve more than a hint of Christian fundamentalism (Angelucci mixes his with reincarnation). That, however, proves nothing about whether extraterrestrial intelligent beings actually exist.

  15. If “everyone knows God exists,” then atheists don’t exist, so why does Ham rail against them? But then, where’s the Hamster’s evidence for this statement?
    As for belief in aliens being religious in nature, it’s certainly true that it can be. (Read <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orfeo_Angelucci ‘s book The Secret of the Saucers as an example–just don’t buy it. Oddly, though, many of them seem to involve more than a hint of Christian fundamentalism (Angelucci mixes his with reincarnation). That, however, proves nothing about whether extraterrestrial intelligent beings actually exist.

  16. Rats. Screwed up my hyperlink again.

  17. @Skeptical Servant
    I thought the Fermi paradox was more of a description of why we ought to see signs of intelligent alien life but have not, rather than a reason. Although I am no expert so please correct me if I have misunderstood.

  18. To Dave Luckett. Yes, there is a large piece of the population that cannot parse reality. And they vote. And they are voting people into state and national elected roles that share the same malady of not being able to parse reality. Alabama, Texas, Florida, Indiana (current VP of the US), the Dakotas, among others. That is scary.

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