Florida Creationism Bill for 2018 — Update

When we saw this at the website of our friends at the National Center for Science Education (NCSE), we were a bit surprised. Their headline is A second antiscience bill in Florida.

Egad! It was only ten days ago that we wrote Florida Creationism Bill for 2018. Now they have another one? We groaned and started reading. NCSE says, with bold font added by us for emphasis:

Florida’House Bill 825, prefiled on November 28, 2017, would, if enacted, require “[c]ontroversial theories and concepts … [to] be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner,” while allowing local school districts to use either the state science standards or alternatives “equivalent to or more rigorous than” them.

That sounds a lot like SB 966, the Senate bill introduced by State Senator Dennis Baxley, the undertaker, that we had just written about, so we looked at the text of both bills. We didn’t check every word of each bill, only most of them — the parts that concern us — and they appear to be identical. So this isn’t a whole new bill — it’s the same bill being introduced into the House.

The legislature’s main page for House bill is here: HB 825. The genius in the House who is sponsoring the thing is Charlie Stone, from Ocala — that’s his page at the legislature’s website. His occupation is “Business Owner,” whatever that may mean, and he’s a high school graduate. Very impressive! His write-up at Wikipedia says his business is “Stone Petroleum Products, a wholesale distributor of petroleum products in Ocala.”

This is the relevant existing part of the existing law, with the proposed addition by both bills shown in bold font:

Science standards must establish specific curricular content for, at a minimum, the nature of science, earth and space science, physical science, and life science. Controversial theories and concepts must be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner.

So when the new session of the legislature starts in January, the hearings in both houses will begin. The funeral director’s bill in the state Senate and the high school graduate’s bill in the state House are ready to go. Stay tuned to this blog!

Copyright © 2017. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

8 responses to “Florida Creationism Bill for 2018 — Update

  1. Our Meticulous Curmudgeon: “We didn’t check every word of each bill, only most of them — the parts that concern us — and they appear to be identical.”

    Quite often, there is no need to check every word — only the last word of each line. If all of the homologous lines in each document end in the same words, you’ve probably got identical documents.

    They appear to be identical to me, too.

  2. “Controversial theories and concepts must be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner.”
    So what facts exist that can be taught about ID/creationism?

  3. I think the petroleum farmer is more concerned with Global Warming and his company’s bottom line.

  4. @DavidK
    Indeed.
    And what facts can ID/creationism teach about?

  5. Holding The Line In Florida

    “Science standards must establish specific curricular content for, at a minimum, the nature of science, earth and space science, physical science, and life science. Controversial theories and concepts must be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner.”

    Hey! I thought I was already doing that with the well established science standards developed by 26 states, the National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the National Research Council, and adopted by the state some 7 years ago. I always teach, what may be controversial to some, the established standards in a most factual, objective and balanced manner. I also keep up to date with the latest information possible. Science Daily is a wonderful tool. Can science be taught in any other way? Can’t help it if some people deny reality. As the old saying goes, “Denial isn’t just a river in Egypt!” Florida was, believe it or not, rated as one of the highest in Science standards back in that day and any short comings were identified and corrected by like minded teachers such as myself. We even mentioned the dreaded “E” word in our text books. Of course this was before the current administration of cretins took over and determined to drive our school system into the arms of the private sector. I feel as if doom looms!!!

  6. Ross Cameron

    ‘Controversial theories and concepts must be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner’ Great minds think alike. To add to the above, where`s the proof of Exodus? The Flud? Miracles? Resurrection? Mitochondrial trail from Eve? Survival inside a whale? Even the provenance of a primitive guide to life?

  7. Science standards must establish specific curricular content for, at a minimum, the nature of science, earth and space science, physical science, and life science. Controversial theories and concepts must be taught in a factual, objective, and balanced manner.

    So where’s the controversy over evolution? Not in the scientific community, except for the nut fringe from which outfits like the Discovery Institute recruit their (hee, hee) “experts.”

  8. If the school boards are to set up standards for aalternatives to be consdered, I would suggest that it must have some positive content. In particular, a proposal not be merely that there is someting wrong with someting else. The board would not have to spend any time in examining a proposal with no positive content.