Creationist Wisdom #821: The Bible Is True

Today’s letter-to-the-editor appears in the Record-Courier, a three times a week newspaper located in Gardnerville, Nevada. The letter is titled Visiting the Holy Land backs up Bible, and the newspaper has no comments feature.

Unless the letter-writer is a politician, preacher, or other public figure, we won’t embarrass or promote him by using his full name — but today we’ve got a preacher. It’s Rich Lammay, pastor of the High Sierra Fellowship in Minden Nevada. We’ll give you a few excerpts from the rev’s letter, enhanced with our Curmudgeonly commentary, and some bold font for emphasis. Here we go!

As I recently visited Israel, I was reminded of the accuracy and reliability of the Bible. As you go to the land where the Bible originates, you discover how archeology becomes one of the evidences for the trustworthiness of scripture. Visiting different historical sights, you see the remains of ancient civilizations that are in sync with the Bible and find a consistency between the historical evidence and the reliability of Scripture.

[*Groan*] We’ve said this before, but it’s worth repeating:

The bible is a collection of mythology, folk-history, poetry, morality tales, rituals, and other things. But some of its historical references mention real places and people — Egypt existed, as did Babylon and other places, and some of the rulers mentioned in the bible actually existed. But that doesn’t mean the entire book is accurate. Gone with the Wind mentions Robert E. Lee and Abe Lincoln, who were real, and a place called Atlanta really was burned by the Yankees. But Gone with the Wind is far from true in every detail. Similarly, there’s no reason to think that everything in the Iliad is true, merely because there really was a place called Troy.

Then the rev says (all ellipses and bracketed material are in his letter):

One great archaeologist said: “No archaeological discovery has ever [overturned] a Biblical reference… And…evaluation of Biblical descriptions has often led to amazing discoveries.”

The rev doesn’t name that “great archeologist,” but you may want to look at Wikipedia’s article titled Historicity of the Bible which questions a number of biblical tales, such as the the Bible’s exodus story and the rapid conquest of Canaanite cities by Joshua.

After that the rev tells us:

But is there more evidence to the reliability of scripture? What other proof is there that we can trust the Bible? Although I can only touch on the topic in this article, my hope is to wet [sic] your appetite for more study on the subject. First there’s evidence in fulfilled prophecy. The Bible is the only book where we find something predicted (perhaps hundreds of years earlier) then find it fulfilled within the pages of the same book.

Right. But you might want to look at Wikipedia’s article on Bible prophecy. The rev continues:

There’s the evidence in the consistency of scripture. The Bible is a collection of 66 different books written by over 40 different authors over a 1500 year period. Yet we find a single message of God’s love for those who trust in him.

Uh huh — not a single contradiction. But check out Wikipedia’s article on Internal consistency of the Bible. Let’s read on:

Next there’s evidence in extra-biblical writings. Men like Josephus, (a Roman historian) who wrote about many of the events around the time of Jesus, and his writings are consistent with the biblical accounts.

Josephus was not a witness to the events in the New Testament. Another excerpt:

The Bible is also filled with scientific accuracy. From the shape of the earth to the earth circling the sun, long before science discovered these things, scripture alluded to them.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! No rebuttal is necessary. Skipping a bit, here’s more:

Finally, powerful evidence for the trustworthiness of scripture is seen in the lives that have been transformed by trusting God.

Okay, that’s enough. Great letter, rev! You’ve convinced us.

Copyright © 2017. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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21 responses to “Creationist Wisdom #821: The Bible Is True

  1. Re “The Bible is also filled with scientific accuracy. From the shape of the earth to the earth circling the sun, long before science discovered these things, scripture alluded to them.” This guy must have got his divinity degree from a diploma mill! He doesn’t recognize that the Bible claims that the Earth is flat and has four corners, that the Bible claims that pi has a value of 3, and that illnesses are caused by demon possession.

    I also suspect this dude is a protestant who claims that the the New Testament supersedes the Old Testament, from which he has extracted his “scientific knowledge.” So, if the NT supersedes the OT, why do they keep claiming scores for the OT (where the Ten Commandments are, the creation story, etc.)?

    He cannot possibly have missed all of that (there is so much more), so where in the Bible does it say that it is okay to lie for Jesus?

  2. The fact that the same publication contains both a prophecy and its fulfilment does not strengthen my confidence that it actually happened. Quite the contrary really.

  3. “The Bible is the only book where we find something predicted (perhaps hundreds of years earlier) then find it fulfilled within the pages of the same book.”
    The Harry Potter series does the same. And of course there is Cassandra.

  4. Sorry, Steve, but illness is caused by demon possession!!! It just that the demons are really really small and are not affected by prayer! Which again proves the buyBull is BS!

  5. Michael Fugate

    Finally, powerful evidence for the trustworthiness of scripture is seen in the lives that have been transformed by trusting God.

    What about those that weren’t? Isn’t that equally powerful evidence of its untrustworthiness?

  6. Scientific accuracy?

    What about the purported global flood and the young earth?

    Both soundly disproved!

  7. Just a wild guess….Lots of Israeli tour guides make their living off Christian visitors. Very helpful to make sure that all tours highlight the sites that validate the Bible and downplay those that don’t.

  8. Remember the “Euthyphro dilemma” (there is a Wikipedia article).
    Consider this variation:
    Is something true because the Bible says it, or does the Bible say it because it is true?
    Can we apply mere human standards to the actions of God? When God kills people, including infants or people who are mentally or emotionally impaired, who are not responsible for their acts, we can say that that is not murder.
    When God sentences people to literally infinite torture for crimes which – because they are human are merely finite, we do not say that it is unjust because the infinite punishment is not commensurate with the finite crime. It is justice because God is not subject to mere human concepts.
    When God takes away property, that is not theft.
    So what about what the Bible says? Is there any reason to apply mere human standards about what is truth?

  9. Michael Fugate

    If Jewish law (all 613) were good enough for Jesus, then why not for Christians?

  10. Michael….613 is used because the jews believe in numerology, by direct count in the buyBull the laws of gawd are ~1158.

  11. “the newspaper has no comments feature.” Curmie, there appears to a comment feature – with two comments as of posting.

  12. The comments link is to the right of the title.

  13. I still don’t see it.

  14. Steve Ruis: ” . . . where in the Bible does it say that it is okay to lie for Jesus?”

    Jesus personally okays it by lying several times himself:

    Jesus: “Verily I say unto you, that this generation shall not pass, till all these things be done.”

    Jesus: “Verily I say unto you, There be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the Son of man coming in his kingdom.”

    Jesus (to his disbelieving brothers, who were ragging on Him to “prove” His divinity to the Jews): ” ‘You go [from Galilee into Judaea] to the festival [Feast of the Tabernacles]. I am not going up to this festival, because my time has not yet fully come.’ [He was afraid that the Jews would kill Him.] After he had said this, he stayed in Galilee. However, after his brothers had left for the festival, he went also, not publicly, but in secret.”

    (Apparently, Jesus saying “Verily” is roughly equivalent to DJTrump saying “Believe Me.”)

  15. Our Unseeing Curmudgeon: “I still don’t see it.”

    The “Comments” link is in the “Share Bar” underneath (on my laptop) the title of the article, to the right of “Tweet”, calling itself, oddly enough, “Comments”.

  16. On my screen, it is under the word “bible” in the title.

  17. @TomS: indeed, the Eutyphro dilemma not only applies to morals. It applies to scientific theories as well.

    Like Surpriseaplenty I find the link under the word “bible” in the title. Three comments – all three sensible.

  18. surprisesaplenty: I clicked over there again. As the page was loading, I saw the “comments” button right where you say it is, but then it vanished. Literally. Clicking in the newly-blank area had no effect. I’ve never had an experience like that before. It’s an abominable mystery.

  19. If you were in my country, South Korea, I would suggest some Internet Explorer -Active X conflict with your computer.

  20. .
    Our Adjectiveless Curmudgeon: “It’s an abominable mystery.”

    This may be a clue — the Comments “link” is actually NOT a hyperlink to another web page with a different URL. For some reason, the term “script” comes to mind.

    When you right click on it, you do not get the long menu headed by “Open in new tab” — you get a four-option menu consisting of “Select all”, “Print”, “Inspect element” and “View source”.

    When the Comments magically appear, there also appears a bona fide hyperlink to take you back — “Go back to article” (https://www.recordcourier.com/news/visiting-the-holy-land-backs-up-bible/#). This is the exact same URL that appears in the address pane of the Comments page.