Discoveroids’ Top Ten for 2017— #10

[30-second sound clip] You are about to leave reality and travel into another dimension — a dimension of the mind, a dimension that exists beyond the laws of nature, unknowable by evidence and reason — a wondrous land of Oogity Boogity! You have embarked on a journey into the realm of miracles and mysticism, where your only guide is faith. There’s a signpost up ahead: Next stop — The Drool Zone.

Your Curmudgeon is delighted. This is that time of year when news of The Controversy between evolution and creationism is scarce, and we find ourselves scrambling to find things to blog about. It was especially bad this year because on Kitzmas, the Discovery Institute broke with their long tradition and failed to post a rant about the Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District decision.

But fear not. They’re maintaining another year-end tradition, which is posting about their Top Ten “achievements” of the year now ending. Today their hilarious series begins. As is usual in such a series, they’re working their way up from the bottom, and they’ll probably reach their Number One creationist news story on New Year’s day. These are the momentous accomplishments that have thrilled the Discoveroids and their generous patrons this year. Are you ready? Okay, let’s get started.

They just posted #10 of Our Top Stories of 2017: Nobel Laureate Is “80 Percent” Confident in Intelligent Design. It was written by Klinghoffer. We’ll give you some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis.

The thing begins with what seems to be an introduction to the whole Top Ten list. We consider it a warning that you’re about to enter The Drool Zone:

These aren’t the news topics you saw covered most extensively in the lockstep mainstream science media, with its devotion to Darwinian materialism. On the contrary, we specialize here in evolution and science stories you won’t find elsewhere else.

Now it starts:

The following article was originally published on June 28, 2017.

Klinghoffer links to and literally copies an old post of his at the Discoveroids’ creationist blog: Brian Josephson, Nobel Laureate in Physics, Is “80 Percent” Confident in Intelligent Design. We wrote about it at the time — see Discovery Institute Has Another Guru

Since Klinghoffer copied his post, we’ll copy the introductory paragraph to ours:

Lacking any trace of evidence for the existence of their intelligent designer — blessed be he! — who allegedly created the universe, the laws of nature, life, and you, the Discovery Institute likes to find “authorities” who support their mystical claims. Now they’ve got a new one.

Josephson’s name has never popped up again, and it’s no wonder. According to his write-up at Wikipedia:

Josephson became interested in philosophy of mind in the late sixties and, in particular, in the mind–body problem, and is one of the few scientists to argue that parapsychological phenomena (telepathy, psychokinesis and other paranormal themes) may be real. In 1971 he began practising transcendental meditation (TM), which had become popular with several celebrities, most famously the Beatles.

Winning the Nobel Prize in 1973 gave him the freedom to work in less orthodox areas, and he became increasingly involved – including during science conferences, to the irritation of fellow scientists – in talking about meditation, telepathy and higher states of consciousness. In 1974 he angered scientists during a colloquium of molecular and cellular biologists in Versailles by inviting them to read the Bhagavad Gita (5th – 2nd century BCE) and the work of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the founder of the TM movement, and by arguing about special states of consciousness achieved through meditation.

If that’s how the Discoveroids start their Top Ten list, you can imagine how exciting the next nine items will be. What further wonders await us? Stay tuned to this blog!

Copyright © 2017. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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12 responses to “Discoveroids’ Top Ten for 2017— #10

  1. All that Josephson’s views show is that that even once-eminent scientists can go gaga. In Josephon’s case it happened when he was unusually young,

  2. As young, bright intellectuals we read Transcendental Meditation by the Maharashi Mahesh Yogi back in 1968 or so (it was popular with the Beatles, so it must have been hip) but gave up that folly for what it was. In the same era, books like Chariots of the Gods were popular and gave us our first insight into pseudoscience, honing our BS detectors.

    Clearly, Josephson is the world’s oldest hippie to still be messing around with TM. Seems fitting that the Tooter’s Number 10 is an eccentric British weirdo. I guess they gave up on the Rainman.

  3. One of those things I don’t quite get: even the sillies at DI should understand that quoting obvious fuddleheads like Josephson is the best way never to be taken seriously in the circles you’re trying to infiltrate.

    But then again, I have the impression the DI Masters have given Klinghoffer a free hand in running their site since they don’t take the enterprise seriously anymore.

  4. The DiscoTute pretty much folded their tent after Kitzmiller. The final blow came with the rejection by Dembski of his very own ID “theory.” With the “brain trust” gone even the Gerb saw the writing on the wall and took a hike. The Tooters are reduced to reliving their glory days, such as they were, promoting crackpots and declaring victory to an empty stadium.

  5. ” The Tooters are reduced to reliving their glory days, such as they were, promoting crackpots and declaring victory to an empty stadium.”

    Actually, that “stadium” that you see is just a green screen overlaying a back alley.

  6. Michael Fugate

    I am sure it will only get worse for ID. Next year they will be looking for articles that have words starting with “i” and “d” in them.

  7. Michael Fugate

    “You are about to leave reality and travel into another dimension — a dimension of the mind, a dimension that exists beyond the laws of nature, unknowable by evidence and reason — a wondrous land of Oogity Boogity! You have embarked on a journey into the realm of miracles and mysticism, where your only guide is faith. There’s a signpost up ahead: Next stop — The Drool Zone.”

    I found “id” twice and “i” n’ “d” once in one paragraph. Miracle? Hand of God?

  8. Even eminent scientists such as Alfred Russel Wallace (yes, Darwin’s co-developer of the theory of evolution by natural selection) can take up weird enthusiasms; in Wallace’s case, it was spiritualism. Such men (and women) are to be pitied.

  9. MichaelF prophetizes: “I am sure it will only get worse for ID.”
    No cheapo like “is that even possible?” from me this time, no matter how tempting. From years of internet experience I know that IDiots and other creacrappers always can get worse. What I will question this time is the standard used. I’ll maintain that regarding the IDiots from Seattle any standard that measures quality of content is irrelevant. What matters is the amount of money coming in. We can rely on the IDiots producing crap. Can they still rely on their sponsors? I am sure our dear SC will keep us informed.

  10. Imagine, if you will, the headline for an equivalent story supporting evolution at Science or Nature:

    “Physicist who won his discipline’s biggest award thinks underlying concept in an entirely different discipline is probably true.”

    Maybe the 4,098,345th biggest story for the year?

  11. I would say that using the word “discipline” is being overly generous.

  12. It occurred to me this morning that we are looking at this all wrong. Don’t y’all think we could generate more plausible ID literature than the Tooters? I mean, we’re a bunch of scientists, learned people, lawyers, writers, professors, etc. It seems to me we have a lot we could contribute to the Disco Tute.

    In return we would become International ID Ambassadors, sent out into the world to conduct seminars, conferences and presentations – all expenses paid. There are parts of the world that desperately need to be informed about the insights of ID. Places like the south of France, Tuscany, Spain, Portugal, Tahiti – and certainly many more places. For travel expenses and about $500/day I’d trade my ivory tower for a seat in KLM business class.

    I think it’s a plan!