Creationism at a Flat Earth Conference

Back in March we told you about this event — see Flat Earth Conference in Canada. We said: “This is an event you don’t want to miss, dear reader. We’ll see you there!” Well, we couldn’t make it, but at least we can give you a report about the history-making event.

The headline is Faith flattens reason at Edmonton’s first Flat-Earth International Conference. It appears in the Edmonton edition of the Toronto Star, Canada’s highest-circulation newspaper. We don’t see any comments feature. Here are some excerpts from the news, with bold font added by us for emphasis, and occasional Curmudgeonly interjections that look [like this]:

Faith took centre stage at Edmonton’s Fantasyland Hotel Thursday as 250 people packed in for the Flat Earth International Conference. Flat-Earthers from around North America came to listen to speakers such as Indiana radio host Rick Hummer, who told them to pull their kids out of public schools and ignore the consensus of the scientific community. “If I were you, I’d get them out of the schools, because they’re not learning the truth,” Hummer told the crowd.

Good advice! Then we’re told:

Presenter Matt Long, a YouTuber from Texas, said he has a “healthy obsession with the Bible and truth” and claimed the Bible is “unequivocally a flat-Earth book.” [He’s right!] Many flat-Earthers believe the Earth is a disc, despite overwhelming scientific and photographic evidence that it is spherical.

The Toronto Star continues:

Most who subscribe to this idea believe humans have not stumbled over the edge of the Earth because it is encircled in a wall of ice, making ground travel impossible, and pilots are too scared to make the trek.

[…]

YouTuber Mark Sargent, who spoke and took questions from the audience Thursday, thinks the universe is a planetarium with man-made projections of a fake moon and stars. He spoke derisively of scientists, none of whom were among the presenters at the conference. “We are the new scientists, and we’re heading straight for you,” Sargent said. “We’ll take the cities, we’ll take the suburbs, we’ll take the countryside.”

Thrilling stuff! Let’s read on:

In most cases, it was an unwavering faith in God that seemed to make the flat-Earth theory fit their world view. “If the shape of the Earth is flat, then that means that it’s been constructed. And if it’s been constructed, we didn’t just blow up out of nothing,” said attendee John Wahlstrom, who travelled from Chilliwack, B.C. for the conference. “That means there’s a whole lot more relevance in the fabric of our lives, rather than just coming from mud to fish to monkey to human beings as the evolutionists put forward.”

Flat Earth and creationism — together at last! Here’s more:

Lindsey Clark from Saskatchewan said the flat-Earth concept seemed simple for her because she doesn’t believe that we “came from monkeys.”

The only thing we can’t figure out is why all creationists aren’t flat-Earthers. They believe the bible, and the bible clearly says The Earth Is Flat! Here’s more:

As far as what scientists could stand to gain by imposing such a massive hoax on humanity, some suggested it goes much deeper, beyond even the government. “I think it reaches right into secret societies that have been manipulating us for hundreds of years,” Lawrie McLeod, of Edmonton, said.

There’s much more in the article, and we know you’re going to click over there to read it all, so here’s our last excerpt:

The Flat Earth International Conference was founded by Edmontonian Robbie Davidson, who is a Christian and a creationist.

The linkage is clear. We suspect that many more creationists are flat-Earthers, but for some reason they don’t talk about it. Events like this conference should encourage them to come out of the closet.

Copyright © 2018. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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16 responses to “Creationism at a Flat Earth Conference

  1. At lest the Flat-Earthers have a alternative hypoothesis: the Earth is shaped somewhat like the azimuth projection on the United Nations flag; They are closer to what the Bible says, without much deference to Modern Science. (I don’t think that they quite go with the Egyptian-Mesopotamian Ancient Near Eastern cosmology that is borrowed by the earliest authors of the Bible. And I don’t think that they accept the pre-existence of water at the beginning of God’s creation as in Genesis. Nobody is perfect.)

  2. As far as what scientists could stand to gain by imposing such a massive hoax on humanity, some suggested it goes much deeper, beyond even the government. “I think it reaches right into secret societies that have been manipulating us for hundreds of years,” Lawrie McLeod, of Edmonton, said.

    Ah, yes. The Rosicrucians, the Learned Elders of Zion and the Illuminati put their heads together and came up with evolution, which they then foisted upon the world through their tool Charles Darwin and his followers and minions.
    It’s all so clear now.

  3. And the conspiracy extends to:
    Euclidean geometry, that product of that same pagan Greek culture which invented the globe-Earth. It’s still being taught as adjunct to the globe-Earth, even though it has been proven wrong!

  4. Dave Luckett

    You have to admit, the Fantasyland Hotel is an absolutely perfect setting for such an event. And meetings like this are actually a good thing. They put all the addled eggs in one basket, so to speak, where they can, er, egg each other on..

    In the eighteenth century, Bethlehem Hospital was a London madhouse. Its name, in typical British fashion, was clipped to “Bedlam”, which remains in the language to this day. Its directors made a useful income by selling tickets to visitors who wished to view the mad people. The organisers of this conference might consider doing the same. That demented babble about science being run by secret societies of awesome reach and power beyond even that of the Deep State is alone worth the price of admission.

    But that particular piece of madly baroque decoration adorns a proposition that I find many Americans actually subscribe to, more or less – namely, that their government and most of their institutions are actually alien impositions. That attitude may have Ulster Scots-Irish roots. That demographic, fecund, lawless, clannish, disdainful of education, and prone to violence, toxic religion and drink, has marked America very deeply.

    But once you come right out with something that crazy, as that barking madman has done, even the vast majority of Americans will feel that this is a voyage to the Twilight Zone. And quite likely he wouldn’t have allowed his diseased mind such latitude if he hadn’t been among fellow-travellers.

    So let them congregate and discharge their effluent freely. Everyone can then smell the stink.

  5. Holding The Line In Florida

    “The Truth is out there. I want to believe.” Of course the Truth is out there. It is the Reptiloids. Trump is one for sure. We all know the Clintons are. We are under their rule. Wear your foil beanies to protect you from the Mind control con-trails! You can be free!! Of course you can.

  6. Eddie Janssen

    Do flat-earthers assume the sun and moon and all the other bodies in the universe to be flat also?

  7. From my quite limited knowledge of Flat Earthers, they do not accept the conventional description of the heavenly bodies, their size, shape, composition, distances, etc.

  8. Mark Sargent: “We’ll take the cities, we’ll take the suburbs, we’ll take the countryside.”

    Amen, brother!

    I hope they take it as far as the Ark Encounter, where they can confront Ken Ham and demand to know why he’s compromising on the Bible and God’s Word. And Ken better live up to name of his organization, and have some pretty damn good answers!

    I wrote recently, a few posts back, on my ‘experience’ with some of these attendees, at an after-conference cocktail party, where everyone turned into Donald Sutherland at the end of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers.”

    The only question now is: Am I still the real ChrisS, or just one of the pod-people?

  9. “Flat Earth and creationism — together at last!”
    Such a sad, sad day. There goes the chance to win over unbelievers like me. See, within a radius of say 100 km I’m already a staunch Flat Earther. To make me expand my view I only need an answer to a simple question: how comes nobody can see the Southern Cross in Europe?

    “secret societies that have been manipulating”
    No.
    No no no no no.
    Conspiracy theories are for nuts, unless there is concrete and direct evidence. Conspiracy theorists are not the new scientists and they are not even the new nuts.

    Let me take away TomS’ doubts by going to the most reliable source available:

    https://theflatearthsociety.org/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=The+Moon&highlight=Moon

    https://www.theflatearthsociety.org/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=The+Sun

    It’s also sad that “the world’s holiest man who knows more about religion and science than everyone else” doesn’t get it:

    https://answersingenesis.org/astronomy/earth/flat-earth-prediction-falls-flat/

  10. “If the shape of the Earth is flat, then that means that it’s been constructed”

    Good morning, non-sequitur police. Did you know how fast you were non-sequituring Mr Wahlstrom?

  11. “YouTuber Mark Sargent [speaks] derisively of scientists, none of whom were among the presenters at the conference. “We are the new scientists, and we’re heading straight for you,””

    That said, it is always ironic to see someone who would unable to invent warm water if left to himself, denigrating people that invented complex technologies that he is happy to use. “New scientist” in his discourse must translate as “scientist unable to conduct or understand science, to discover anything”. Heuristic sterility is a quality for auto-proclamed “Truth researchers”.

    But some influent flat-earthers are just hypocrits: they pose as “rebels against the system” only to get money from their credule audience. They lie, coldly, and are respected by some for that.

  12. If you think about it Chilliwack BC is a great place for a flat earth creationist be from.. This would also be a wonderful locale for a Time Cube Society chapter.

  13. “250 people packed in for the Flat Earth International Conference”

    Can somebody help me out, because I can’t remember: What was the population size represented by the leftmost 1% under the IQ bell curve? Was it 250?

  14. Idea for book: Across The World in 80 Days.

  15. The conclusion to “Around the World in 80 Days” is based on the difference of one day in sailing into the sunrise. There was no “International Date Line” in those days. This was remarked on by the sailors who completed Magellan’s circumnavigation, when they returned to Europe.

  16. I remember when I read Around the World in 80 Days years ago (as a kid), thinking it had one of the most ingenious endings ever.

    @Draken lmao