Creationist Wisdom #898: Satan in the Schools

Today’s letter-to-the-editor appears in The Daily Chronicle of Centralia, Washington. They have a comments feature, but there aren’t any yet. The letter is titled An Appeal for Creationism.

Because the writer isn’t a politician, preacher, or other public figure, we won’t embarrass or promote her by using her full name. Her first name is Doris. Excerpts from her letter will be enhanced with our Curmudgeonly commentary, some bold font for emphasis, and occasional Curmudgeonly interjections that look [like this]. Here we go!

Deep within our nation’s venerated “halls of ivy” lurk some ideas that are anything but true. So as school days are upon us there is need for a call to vigilance lest truth becomes lost in the shuffle of feet going from class to class to earn treasured grades needed for a bright future. Ideas have consequences.

Egad! What truth is getting lost? Doris says:

The truths in danger are those of hope in the eternal God, who calls us and equips us for a journey of opportunity where we learn to sift good from evil and win eternal rewards through faith in him.

Jeepers — she’s right! They don’t teach that in school. Doris tells us:

Richard Dawkins, the ardent evolutionist, when cornered [Cornered!] for not being able to accept a universe planned and designed by an intelligent being, in defense of his godless philosophy said, “If there is a God why hasn’t he revealed himself?” Such ignorance questions Dawkins’ education, for God has from the beginning been an ardent revealer of his plans and purposes for those he loves. The zenith of his revelation came through Jesus who said, in seeing me you have seen the Father.

Dawkins is a fool! Doris continues:

Among other places, the god of this world, Satan himself [Gasp!], lurks in the false ideas that rule out God in our educational institutions. One of this false god’s biggest ploys is the idea that science and religion must be kept separate. If so, there would have been billions of years of death and dying before God pronounced that all his creation was very good.

Death before creation? That’s impossible! Let’s read on:

Science and theology are inseparable. [So true!] Sin caused death after perfect creation, not before. [Right!] God and his works of creation involved designing the human body as a machine far and above that of the animal world in importance, including a spirit and a soul that has volition, not just instinct. DNA shows us that there was never a “simple cell.” While there are some mutations, they are limited within each species; for God created everything after its kind.

Doris speaks The Truth! Another excerpt:

A few years ago upon entering the Burke Museum near the University of Washington I was faced with the sign that read, “If you have a backbone you descended from a fish.” Yet, in all the specimens there were no links to humanity. They were all fish.

No mermaid fossils? Stupid museum! Here’s more

At Walmart, or on the internet, you can find a book for about $4 called “Eternity in their Hearts” by veteran missionary Don Richardson. Please read this, especially if you happen to take anthropology at Centralia College.

Here’s the book at Amazon. Centralia College is a two-year community college in Doris’ home town. We assume the ol’ devil is polluting their anthropology courses.

And now we come to the end:

Richardson’s extensive world research indicates that God’s revelation of himself existed from the beginning but was lost because civilizations rejected it and failed to pass it on. Creation is as simple as this: God spoke and it was done and he is speaking yet to those who will seek, search for and listen to him.

So there you are, dear reader. Make of it what you will.

Copyright © 2018. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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13 responses to “Creationist Wisdom #898: Satan in the Schools

  1. So this dude uses a fairy tale about a psychopathic killer, and then adds an invented demon, to scare people into some strange thought patterns that can be shown to be BS! People sure are weird!

  2. “The zenith of his revelation came through Jesus who said, in seeing me you have seen the Father.”
    Given that Jesus has been dead for quite a while I haven’t had the opportunity to see him either. Worse – nor have I ever me someone or something called Satan.

    “Science and theology are inseparable.”
    Yeah, physics can’t do without some god or another when predicting what happens when Doris jumps off a bridge.

  3. Doris appears to be like most creationist rank and file. She hasn’t the faintest idea of what evidence actually is. This works both ways. She discounts actual evidence and at the same time asserts as evidence material that isn’t. False positives and equally false negatives. The fossils in a museum display are not evidence for slow change over time; words in an ancient text are evidence for God. Only for her god, mind. Other texts, far more ancient and voluminous, are not evidence for other gods.

    I’m as certain as I can be that the real creationist cheerleaders – AiG, CMI, all those – are perfectly aware of this mindset. They know that if it ever comes down to critical analysis of evidence, even at the most rudimentary level, they lose. Most of their effort has to go into never allowing such an exercise. Fortunately for them, they also know that it would be completely alien to the average creationist ever to attempt it.

  4. Creationists never fail to impress (and depress) me.

  5. Oh, Doris. She’s not alone in the Matrix.

    Imagine going to a movie that had a preview that one really loved. Then sitting in the theater … and never leaving. Just sitting back, watch the hero and heroine struggle through whatever the script calls for: the happy & scary moments, the Highway to Heaven lump-in-the-throat moments. And just sit there … disbelief suspended indefinitely.

    A part of me kind of admires that.

    But the nice thing about movies (aside from the fun heart-stopping, tear-jerking, escapist joy ride) is that they end. Well … unless they make a sequel: Jesus 2.0! Back in the Sandals Again!

    No!? Sorry…

  6. Ah, yes, the Great Library of Walmart, truly one of the Wonders of the Ancient World. Precious seat of the fruits of human knowledge, all stored in those venerable discounted books gathered together in shiny remainder bins.

    Legend has it that the Great Library of Walmart was destroyed by a rampaging mob of fanatical atheists, but today thousands of Walmarts dot the landscape, and millions of middle Americans like Doris can enter those hallowed, polished aisles, avail themselves of the wisdom contained therein, and contemplate the verities of the eternal God.

    And if you’re extra quick about it, Walmart are having a terrific sale right now: you can pick up a spirit AND a soul*. Two for the price of one! Just tell ’em Doris sent you!

    *With free volition!

  7. Doris should spend more time in the museum and less time with ancient texts and Walmart books, though I admit it’s next to impossible to change a creationist’s mind with evidence, especially when they invoke satan.

  8. Re “Sin caused death after perfect creation, not before.”

    Why do people keep saying this when contradicted by their god: “And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:” (Genesis 3:22)

    Adam and Eve were created mortal as this story suggests, so “death is not the wages of sin.” Can’t these people ever get it right?

  9. [Doris:] “The truths in danger are those of hope in the eternal God”

    To hope for something doesn’t mean that it is true, or that it really exists. So when you use hope as a synonym for truth, you’re too logically challenged to separate what is false from what is true. (And you will have problem with good and bad, also, which makes you morally challenged.)

  10. To (over)simplify, there are at least three major theories of truth;
    1. Correspondence: Someting is true if it corresponds to the world
    2. Coherence: Something is true if it is coherent with itself and and with other truths
    3. Pragmatic: Someting is ture if it works
    The standard proof-text of 2 Timothy 3:16-17 says
    “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works.”
    This is a clear statement of pragmatism: what is profitable.

  11. Looks like a circular reasonning to me: Paul has postulated that what’s given by “inspiration of god” is profitable, and since Paul think it is profitable, he saw some kind of profit which support the idea that what’s given by the “inspiration of god” is profitable.

  12. Science and theology are inseparable. [So true!] Sin caused death after perfect creation, not before. [Right!] God and his works of creation involved designing the human body as a machine far and above that of the animal world in importance, including a spirit and a soul that has volition, not just instinct. DNA shows us that there was never a “simple cell.” While there are some mutations, they are limited within each species; for God created everything after its kind.

    Ah, yes: argument by declaration. “It’s true because I say so, and I say so because it says so in the Bible.”

    DNA, of course, does not show us what she claims it does. And it’s perfectly clear that some animals have “volition” alongside instinct: anyone who’s ever owned a cat, let alone anyone who’s ever studied primates, knows this. On the other hand “a spirit and a soul” can only be inferred from conscious behavior (or, of course, taken for granted because the Bible says they exist). Then, of course, there’s the matter of mutations, about which dear Doris apparently knows as much as she does about DNA and the development of the cell, which is to say, nothing.

  13. And: “I say that it is in the Bible because I want it to be true and the Bible is flexible enough to be used to say whatever one wants.”