Editorial Supports Hambo on School Field Trips

We found a totally crazy editorial in the Tulsa Beacon, a weekly newspaper in Tulsa, Oklahoma. They don’t have a comments section. The editorial is titled Atheists target school field trips. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis, and occasional Curmudgeonly interjections that look [like this]:

A group of atheists [Gasp!] is trying to prevent school children in Kentucky from visiting the Ark Encounter and Creation Museum. They sent letters to some schools surrounding the museum with a warning that they shouldn’t take students on field trips there because all public school events should be “secular.” They want students to be taught that only the theory of evolution – that man evolved from ape-like creatures [Oh no!] – be taught and that schools have no Christian influence.

We recently wrote about the field trip controversy — see Hambo’s War on the Constitution. Hambo was complaining about a letter claiming that public school field trips to the Ark Encounter or Creation Museum are unconstitutional violations of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. He insisted that separation of church and state is nonsense. Now he has support in Oklahoma. The editorial says:

They [the hell-bound atheists] ignore the U.S. Constitution, which allows students to explore differing viewpoints. [Huh?] Ken Ham, the CEO and founder of Answers in Genesis, said children already get “evolutionary and atheistic indoctrination … five days a week for the whole school year.”

Then the editorial tells us:

The only way that a public school would violated the Establishment Clause of the Constitution would be if teachers told students that this is the only true interpretation and that they must accept Jesus Christ. In other words, there is nothing wrong with a visit to the museum but it is an exceptional educational and cultural experience.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! The teachers don’t need to say anything. Hambo’s museum and Ark replica make that claim for them. The editorial continues:

It is a parallel principle to the teaching of the Bible in public schools, which is completely constitutional even though school boards and administrators all over the nation forbid it.

Yes, it’s “completely” Constitutional. Let’s read on:

This is a bullying tactic by the secular humanists (atheists) who want students to be indoctrinated – not taught – only the “facts” that they adhere to.

Ooooooooooooh! Insisting that public schools should adhere to the Constitution is a “bullying tactic.” Why — Oh why — do they oppose theocracy?

Another excerpt:

The rate of Biblical illiteracy in America is getting worse. When the United States was founded, the Bible was the primary textbook. Our legal system is based on principles from the Bible.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! See Is America a “Christian Nation”? And now we come to the end:

The field trips should continue unhindered.

Hambo must be thrilled to be supported by such a brilliant editorial. So let the buses roll!

Copyright © 2018. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

14 responses to “Editorial Supports Hambo on School Field Trips

  1. That editorial rates a perfect 100 out of 100 for failing to state anything rational. I wonder how many letters to the editor will complain about the rampant idiocy? The newspaper even has an ironic name “Tulsa Beacon” since a beacon generally provides a warning. Are they warning against education and reality?

  2. secularists and humanists and atheists Oh my. !!!!!
    and your little dog toooo !

  3. The Tulsa Beacon appears to have a long history of promoting Creationism, and appears to have a fairly strong conservative Evangelical slant.

  4. Isn’t it sad? The first colonists (who began the reenactment of the Canaanite Genocide, with the Indians as the unvoluntary replacements) fled from England because they were persecuted for their religion. And now they are persecuted again! Where has the USA come to and how did it happen?

    PS: don’t pay attention to the simple fact that creacrap committees are totally free to organize such trips by themselves – after school.

  5. “The only way that a public school would violated (sic)…”

    The “Tulsa Be-conned”: some nothing rag that not only endorses
    scientific illiteracy, and allows Ham’s shameless hyperbole to go unchallenged (“evolutionary and atheistic indoctrination…five days a week for the whole school year”), but can’t even manage some decent bloody proof-reading.

    Recently, we had a scientific study that indicated a link between creationism and conspiracy theories. But we hardly need a study into the correlation between creationists and poor grasp of basic English. It’s demonstrated time and again, in their letters, and even editorials.(Sure: I’m anal. I’m the man who came from Uranus).

    “America’s got TROUBLE, friends! Right here in Tulsa City! TROUBLE! That starts with T, and that rhymes with C, and that stands for CREATIONISM!”

  6. Sorry, SC. Can you fix the second paragraph, just after “scientific…?”

    My proof-reader suddenly keeled over from food-poisoning.

    Thanks.

    [*Voice from above*]: Behold, it is done!

  7. failing to state anything rational
    We’re talking creationism!

  8. I’d like to see the Tulsa Bacon (made from rear end of pig) scramble when a teacher suddenly starts reading the Quran in a public school.

  9. he only way that a public school would violated the Establishment Clause of the Constitution would be if teachers told students that this is the only true interpretation and that they must accept Jesus Christ. In other words, there is nothing wrong with a visit to the museum but it is an exceptional educational and cultural experience.

    Nonsense. A visit to an explicitly sectarian facility conducted by teachers and funded by tax money violates the Establishment Clause, period.

  10. Charles Deetz ;)

    When Hambo made the AE a religious operation, not just a non-profit, he gave up any right to secular school trips.

  11. I was thinking that if I taught JH/HS Biology/Science in the vicinity of Hambo’s amusement park, I would take my classes there and spend the day demonstrating the sheer ignorance of the whole shebang.

  12. Wouldn’t it be more appropriate for a college freshman class on critical thinking – philosophy 101?

  13. Yes, but I think that the field trips referenced are usually K-12

  14. “five days a week for the whole school year” and this indeed is the time the field trips happen.