Dinosaurs and Dragons — Big Controversy

This could be one of the wildest controversies around, and we hardly know where to begin. Let’s start with the website of Answers in Genesis (AIG), the creationist ministry of Ken Ham (ol’ Hambo) — the ayatollah of Appalachia, the world’s holiest man who knows more about religion and science than everyone else.

Their headline is Dragon Legends — Truths Behind the Tales. It was written by Bodie Hodge, Hambo’s son-in-law.

They say it’s something they published before, back in 2011. We checked our archives. Yup, we blogged about it back then — see AIG: There Were Dragons on Noah’s Ark. Why is AIG running the thing again? Are dragons that important?

AIG once more gives us a round-up of dragon legends that seem to appear globally — including the behemoth and the leviathan in the bible. What’s the point of it all? Here’s one excerpt that may give you some insight:

Dragons appear again and again in the records of cultures around the world, as well as in their art and pottery. The similarities are hints that many accounts may be based on actual encounters with these creatures — dinosaurs and other reptiles which God created on day five and six (Genesis 1:20–25) and which survived the Flood aboard Noah’s Ark (Genesis 6:19).

Yeah, okay — there were dragons on the ark. More work for Mrs. Noah. Bodie doesn’t have much else to say. He didn’t the first time around, but ol’ Hambo thought this thing from his son-in-law deserved another airing. Okay, we’ve seen it again.

Wait — hold on! Maybe there’s more to this than recycling an old creationist article. What could it be? Well, we should remind you that not all creationists are obsessed with the survival of dinosaurs and dragons. Some don’t think they ever existed. We posted this back in 2015: Mothers Against Dinosaurs! Those ladies were part of a group that has this website: Christians Against Dinosaurs.

In case you head isn’t whirling yet, there’s also this recent article at Panda’s Thumb: “We Believe in Dinosaurs” opens in San Francisco. Do you see the problem?

We certainly believe in dinosaurs — but they went extinct 65 million years ago, which is where we differ from Hambo, who thinks they were on Noah’s Ark. Other creationists don’t believe they ever existed. There seems to be a major controversy brewing, dear reader. It’s a wild world out there.

Copyright © 2019. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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15 responses to “Dinosaurs and Dragons — Big Controversy

  1. docbill1351

    “but they went extinct 65 million years ago”

    Except for birds. Minor quibble. Birds evolved from dinosaurs that went extinct, I guess that would be correct. (awaiting slings and arrows)

  2. Robert Baty

    Peter J. Reilly, today, reports on his trip to Kent Hovind’s Dinosaur Adventure Land at:

    https://ytmp.blogspot.com/2019/03/a-day-at-dinosaur-adventure-land.html

    .

  3. It’s rumored that the Flat Earth crusaders to Antarctica are taking along a devastating secret weapon — an unholy creature of darkness, said to breathe jets of blue fire:

    “Mr. Undead Dragon: TEAR DOWN THIS ICE WALL!!!”

    The rest of the solar system is about to get a damn good soaking.

  4. siluriantrilobite

    Actually, the title “We Believe in Dinosaurs “ is taken from a creationist working on the Ark stating such. At least one of the scientists interviewed for the documentary noted that science and scientists don’t “believe” in dinosaurs because there is plenty of actual empirical evidence that dinosaurs existed.

    Sent from my iPad

  5. Now I wonder: does Ol’Hambo believe that dinosaurs breathed fire? It’s one of those similarities, you see.

  6. Richard Bond

    A few days ago I visited the temple at Ta Prohm in Cambodia, where a carving on a doorway is claimed by creationists to represent a Stegosaurus, and therefore to constitute proof that dinosaurs lived recently.

    Actually, it looks nothing like a Stegosaurus: the head is far too large, the relative proportions of the front and rear legs are wrong, and there is no sign of the thagomizer. What creationists claim are the dermal plates of a Stegosaurus are actually part of the background, perhaps the petals of a flower. It is not obvious in photos taken from the front, but these “plates” are set well back from the centre line of the creature, as defined by the position of its tail. I took a photo at an acute angle that shows this clearly.

    If the carving is meant to represent a real animal, my guess would be a chameleon. The proportions are about right, and there is a hint, partially eroded, of what might have been a neck frill. In any case, as usual, the creationists are obviously lying.

  7. Karl Goldsmith

    All Answers in Genesis articles are recycled, they have two dates on old articles, so “on October 1, 2011; last featured March 24, 2019” means it was a new article in 2011, then the second date is last time it was used. Most articles get a change in last used date because AiG twitter is a bot account that uses the second date to see what articles have not been posted recently.

  8. I’m surprised that nuisance @genuinearticlex7 hasn’t showed up to weigh in on the subject of dino/human coexistence, with his photos of little figurine stegosauri, Cambodian temple carvings, and all the rest.

    The examples of dinosaurs that creationists point to as “evidence” are nearly always the out-dated, pre-seventies versions — the stumpy, cloddish ones some of us are familiar with from our childhoods — before the whole bird connection changed our understanding of the field.

  9. For the humor impaired, it’s pretty clear that “Christians Against Dinosaurs” is a satire site.

  10. Ironically creationists totally fail to recognize that they are todays “dinosaurs”.
    They will continually reduce in numbers and eventually die out in favor of some other form of willfully ignorant idiocy.

    “Yesterdays” staunch creationists have fallen back onto ID and “tomorrow” they will again have to retreat to another location with foundations of sand. Of course there will be an essentially endless supply of ignorant followers just like todays geocentrists, young and flat Earthers.

  11. @ChrisS observes: “….. before the whole bird connection changed our understanding of the field.”
    Of course the big advantage of creacrappers is they don’t need any understand of that field and hence don’t have to change it either.

    Inspired by Zetopan I’ve decided to dedicate this video to them.

  12. Pete Moulton

    No slings or arrows from me, docbill. There’s a mountain of evidence to support the theory that birds are the descendants of maniraptoran dinos. In fact, it’s very difficult to draw any line separating the nonavians from the avians. All the features that we once thought differentiated birds from dinosaurs–feathers, for one example–turn out to have their origins back among the undisputed dinos.

  13. Techreseller

    Doc Bill. You took the words right out of my mouth. Completely agree with you. Sorry to disappoint.

  14. Dragons appear again and again in the records of cultures around the world, as well as in their art and pottery. The similarities are hints that many accounts may be based on actual encounters with these creatures — dinosaurs and other reptiles which God created on day five and six (Genesis 1:20–25) and which survived the Flood aboard Noah’s Ark (Genesis 6:19).

    Funny—I don’t recall hearing of any references to dragons in Native American culture, or that of native Australians. Even the “dragons” which appear in southern African legends don’t look like the ones we think of from European and Oriental myth, but rather like giant snakes, sometimes with one pair of legs.

    Surely if all of humanity had spread out from eight people in a single spot, every culture everywhere would have its dragon legends.

  15. @Erc Lipps
    The Wikipedia article on “Dragon” says this:
    “Beliefs about dragons vary drastically by region, but dragons in western cultures since the High Middle Ages have often been depicted as winged, horned, four-legged, and capable of breathing fire. Dragons in eastern cultures are usually depicted as wingless, four-legged, serpentine creatures with above-average intelligence.”