Self-Published Genius #94: The Autodidact

Today, dear reader, we have a new addition to our series about Self-Published Geniuses. This is where we bring you news of authors with a vanity press book in which the author claims to have made paradigm-shattering discoveries, and announces his work by hiring a press release service.

As an extra service, we won’t make you struggle with our title. The definition of autodidact is: “a person who has learned a subject without the benefit of a teacher or formal education; a self-taught person.” Now that everything is under control, we shall proceed.

The title of the press release is Author Mark Sottile’s New Book “Of God and Pterodactyls” is an Ambitious Attempt at Reconciling Science with Theology. Like so many others in our collection, it was issued by Cision PRWeb, which says it’s “the leader in online news distribution and publicity.” Here are some excerpts from the press release, with bold font added by us for emphasis, and occasional Curmudgeonly interjections that look [like this]:

Mark Sottile, an autodidactic student [Ding, ding!] of social sciences, environmental sciences, archaeology, the universe, philosophy, theology, “and a whole host of words that end in –ology,” as he said of himself, has completed his new book “Of God and Pterodactyls”: an intelligence junky’s effort at proving that science and spirituality need not be seen as opposites.

Intrigued, aren’t you? Of course you are! Who wouldn’t be? The press release then quotes the author:

“The name of this book, Of God and Pterodactyls, is meant to philosophically explain in my own words how science and theology can be merged and tied together as one unified thought process, softening the stark, harsh disparity between evolution and creation,” Mark Sottile said of his work. “In this book, hopefully, I’ve blended and melded all my favorite sciences and philosophies into a potent homogeneous book.”

Ooooooooooooh! The author has merged and blended and melded everything! Isn’t this what you’ve been seeking all your life? Of course it is! The press release tells us:

Published by New York City-based Page Publishing [Ding, ding!], the core argument of Mark Sottile’s aspirational work is to prove that there need not be such a disconnect between accepting scripture and acknowledging scientific theories of evolution.

Aha! We’re given the name of the publisher. We already have the press release, but to make sure that this book qualifies for our collection, we need to know: Was it published by a vanity press? We found their website — Page Publishing. They don’t come right out and say it, but their website leaves no doubt — they’re a vanity publisher. They even say:

In most instances, books we distribute through Apple iTunes or Amazon will result in 70% net revenue to the author (with Apple/Amazon keeping the other 30% as their sales commission). Accordingly, if your book is available on these platforms for a retail price of $9.95, you would receive net revenue of $6.97 from Apple or Amazon, and remit only 20 cents to us.

Okay, the book clearly qualifies for our collection! Then they quote the author again:

“The point I’m making here is that there doesn’t have to be such a discord among creationists and evolutionists, as I feel they could inevitably join emotionally and spiritually, as this is an intellectual endeavor that surpasses most human minds,” Mark Sottile summarized his work’s purpose.

Ooooooooooooh! It’s an intellectual endeavor that surpasses most human minds, and the author has done it for you in his book! Isn’t that wonderful?

The rest of the press release is promotional stuff, so we’ll leave them and search for the book at Amazon. [Ding, ding!] Here it is: Of God and Pterodactyls. It’s only $8.08 in paperback, and for that you get a book that’s 50 pages long. Wowie! There are no reviews yet — you can be the first!

Amazon has a “look inside” feature for this book. Go ahead, take a look. You’ll be encouraged to place your order immediately. And when you do, tell ’em the Curmudgeon sent ya.

Copyright © 2019. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

8 responses to “Self-Published Genius #94: The Autodidact

  1. Michael Fugate

    The transcendence argument for God. If I feel awe, then God exists.

  2. Yup. I quote: “So if anyone has doubt there is a God (I actually don’t doubt there is no god at all, with or without capital), look straight up into a clear night sky, and wonder who, when, how.” (italized by me, FrankB).
    Also: the Goldilock Zone can’t be an accident.
    However, credit where credit is due. This genius is no creacrapper. “We all share, at least in theory, a common ancestry.” It’s still crap though.

  3. I’m so disappointed. I looked at the Amazon preview, hoping to find which god(s) Pterodactyls liked. But alas, the preview did not enlighten me. My guess is that’s because Pterodactyls had no exposure to gods, since none had been invented by people at the time Pterodactyls lived.

  4. “In the beginning it was so dark you couldn’t see your hand in front of your face.”

    He’s off to a riveting start!

  5. chris schilling

    @MichaelF
    This joke is arthritic, but here it is again:
    John Wayne on the set of “The Greatest Story Ever Told”:

    “Truly this man was the Son of God.”
    Director: “John, try saying it with more awe.”
    “Awww, truly this man was the Son of God.”

  6. “God said, ‘Let there be light!’ And there was light. There was still nothing, but you could see it a whole lot better.”
    attributed to Ellen DeGeneres

  7. “Creationists and evolutionists … could inevitably join emotionally and spiritually”
    Finally, this is the book which will unite Ken Ham and Richard Dawkins!
    And Ham will have a new wing at the Creation Museum called “The New Science of Biblical Evolution”

  8. @Abeastwood is disappointed: “the preview did not enlighten me.”.
    Didn’t the excessive usage of the worde Genesis give you a clue?